Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images: Blog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog en-us (C) Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Sat, 20 Feb 2021 18:58:00 GMT Sat, 20 Feb 2021 18:58:00 GMT https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/img/s/v-12/u231046202-o512919903-50.jpg Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images: Blog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog 120 86 110 nights. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2021/2/110-nights Regular reader(s?) of this blog may know that we have a few (at least two) hedgehogs that frequent our (front and back) gardens each Spring, Summer and Autumn - these wee visitors' visiting rights being somewhat facilitated by me digging tunnels under our fences in the borders and even through concrete under our side door.

Our hedgehogs disappeared in the fourth week of October 2020 - to begin their hibernation we thought - even if at the time, that seemed early - particularly so as it was hardly cold then - I'm not sure if we were close to our first frost of Autumn or Winter 2020 at that point.

Anyhoo - I've been keeping an eye on their old traditional feeding station since then (a cat-proof tunnel made from an old soffit board leaned up against our wall, and held in place with bricks) even though I've not left any food out for them since early November.

Yesterday morning, so Friday 19th February 2021, we had our smallest (we think) hedgehog awake from its hibernaculum (we aren't sure where that is although I suspect I may know) after c.110 nights - and check out its old feeding station, for a bit of a pick-me-up.

Of course, I'd not left any food there - so it quickly left.

I have a small infra-red camera in the tunnel which records any motion in front of the lens - the below is the footage that this camera shot before dawn yesterday morning.

I did leave food there last night but it failed to return for whatever reason. Perhaps it got up for a pee, a bite to eat and a stretch and has returned to its hibernation for a week or two - we'll see... the camera is still there and the motion activation software still err... activated, for want of a better word.

Anyway - lovely news from our gaff this week - all feels better in the world when "our" hedgehogs are doing their nightly rounds.

Spring.... it's coming....

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2021/2/110-nights Sat, 20 Feb 2021 18:57:46 GMT
A pregnant vixen? You tell me. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2021/2/a-pregnant-vixen-you-tell-me It's been six weeks or so since I blogged last.

You know the score I'm sure.

Work is busy.

Then there are the regular CoVid-19 tests for the weeuns. (Our most recent was this week).

The home schooling.

The lockdown.

I hope, come the late winter to start blogging with a little more frequency... but until then... I thought I'd quickly stop by and play you a 10 second (or so) video clip that I shot on my trail camera in the garden a couple of nights ago.

I pointed the trail camera at our side passage, with a view to getting clips of our cats stealing each others' food - so we could act accordingly.

Anywaaayy.... the trail camera picked up a rather rotund fox.

Now I know its winter, so the foxes' coats are thick. And it's breeding season so they're in fine form. But this fox (which I think I've seen before hanging around our garden - the dark spot at the base of the tail is a bit of a giveaway) seems at least to me, to appear to be a pregnant vixen.

Far as I was aware, foxes tend to enter peak mating season in January, be pregnant come February and give birth around late March - so if this is indeed a pregnancy and a visible one at that (rather than just a heavy set fox with a belly full of poultry for example), then this is a fox which has been pregnant for some time and is therefore looking to give birth a fortnight or more earlier than late March I'd speculate (wildly).

Look.

I may be wrong.

I am certainly no vulpine expert. Not really a fan at all of foxes if I'm honest.

Maybe someone who knows more about foxes than me (that would be pretty-well anyone) can comment below or email me and let me know if this is indeed, a pregnant vixen.

I hope you're all doing well. Coping with the cold. (I've wrapped old pairs of my pants around our exterior water pipes, in case they burst in this cold tonight. The pipes that is. Not my pants).

More soon.

TBR.

 

Pregnant vixen?In early February? Seems a little early to me to be showing this much errr.... girth.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2021/2/a-pregnant-vixen-you-tell-me Wed, 10 Feb 2021 19:43:35 GMT
Around the birds in eighty aves. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2021/1/around-the-birds-in-eighty-aves I've come up with a game this year. A game for our eldest who (surprise surprise) is really starting to get into his wildlife and birds in particular.

So.The local barn owls and kingfishers all clubbed together  this year - and got him a wee pocket bird book for Christmas (the RSPB one as it happens which is EXCELLENT, by the way) and I've challenged him to try and spot 80 different species of birds this year.

Each time he spots a species, he puts a wee red numbered sticker on that page in his bird book (and so, "ticks it off" effectively).

The three rules are simple. 

1 - He (or I, if I'm with him) must be 100% sure of the ID of the species.

2 - it must be SEEN (rather than only heard).

3 - Just because he's ticked off a bird from the list of 80, that does NOT make that bird "boring" or "irrelevant" for the rest of the year. (For kerreist's sake don't you dare turn into a "twitcher" or "birder" because of this game!).

 

Look I'm NO "birder" (shudder) or even a "bird watcher" let alone a "twitcher". I don't know how many species of birds I've seen nor do I count them on a list of any kind.

But.

I do know a little about aves and I can help my eldest boy with his quest to get to 80 bird spp. this year (a total that I came up with which should be doable if we're not all confined to barracks by this dreadful government).

Now.

I'll not blog about every species we find but I thought I'd quickly post tonight on what we found today, to kick off his "Around the birds in 80 aves" quest.

If we get the odd surprise (as we did today) then I may also blog about that too.

For now though.

January 1st 2021. Target 80 spp.

34 species seen today (in order of seeing them):

1

Magpie

2

Woodpigeon

3

Carrion Crow

4

Jackdaw

5

Blackbird

6

Song Thrush

7

Robin

8

Barn Owl

9

Starling

10

Kestrel

11

Red Kite

12

Fieldfare

13

Cormorant

14

Jay

15

Mallard

16

Herring Gull

17

Buzzard

18

Canada Goose

19

Tufted Duck

20

Redwing

21

Black-headed Gull

22

House Sparrow

23

Feral Pigeon

24

Blue Tit

25

Great Tit

26

Grey Heron

27

Moorhen

28

Egyptian Goose

29

Pied Wagtail

30

Goldfinch

31

Stonechat

32

Wren

33

Collared Dove

34

Ring-necked Parakeet

Meaning we have 80-34  (46) species left to see in 364 days.

The nice surprise of the day (today) was watching a (young, female) stonechat on the edge of a new-build housing estate on my favourite local golf course (which is now, as I say, not a local golf course any more but a housing estate and a SANG instead). At first I thought it could have even been a black redstart (I don't think I've ever seen one of them) but the wee white wing patches, visible as it flew away from us, confirmed it as a stonechat - very unexpected mind and lovely to see.

Only two disappointments really today - no peregrines (we'll definitely see them within the month though, I'm sure) and no kingfisher either (ditto).

Anyway - a great start from a very local drive (30 mins) around Binfield and North Bracknell and also a 45 minute or so walk up and down a local river in the neighbourhood.

More soon I'm sure...

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) aves birds https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2021/1/around-the-birds-in-eighty-aves Fri, 01 Jan 2021 19:50:54 GMT
A little something to cheer you up. Maybe? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/12/a-little-something-to-cheer-you-up-maybe I know.

We're all having a crap year.

So, this morning, a wee blog post to cheer you up.

Perhaps?

 

Any regular visitor to this website will probably know by now that I am besotted with swifts - they are demonstrably (and by far), the best birds of all - and to that extent, I'll have no debate thankyou very much.

Now of course, it varies a little, up and down the country, as to when our breeding swifts arrive each year and indeed when they leave, but a handy average would be to think of them arriving on the first day of May each year, staying for three full months and leaving on the last day of July.

(No need to write a comment and say WELL MR RABBIT, MYYYY SWIFTS ARRIVE ON APRIL 23rd and DON'T LEAVE UNTIL AUGUST 7th! This 3 month average I've just described above is a good rule of thumb for swifts - that's all).

 

OK.

So.

Swifts stay with us for 92 days each year (May 1st to July 31st inclusive).

Then they are gone for 273 days. (August 1st - April 30th inclusive).

273 days divided by two equals 136.5 days.

Now.

Let's say our swifts left us at 10pm on the last day (31st) of July. Plausible.

31st July 10pm add 136.5 days equals:15th December 10am. 

 

In summary.

Swifts are not with us for 273 days of each year.

Now that we've reached (or passed as it happens, today) December 15th, our swifts have broken the back of that 273 day period. We're closer in time to the date that they return to us, than the date they left.

And that, for me at least, in these miserable dark days of mid or late December, is at least a spot of light in the distance.

 

Keep on poddling, eh?

They'll be back soon.

TBR.

SwiftSwift

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/12/a-little-something-to-cheer-you-up-maybe Wed, 16 Dec 2020 09:43:03 GMT
The selfish gene and huge genitals. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/12/the-selfish-gene-and-huge-genitals Not withstanding the fact that I have, for years now, thought of Richard Dawkins, (one of my earliest heroes in zoology) as an arsehole these days; in his marvellous book of 1976, The Selfish Gene, he nicks Tennyson's "..nature. Red in tooth and claw" to describe the behaviour of all living things which arises out of the "survival of the fittest" doctrine - and that's a superb quote which I'll not forget.

I was reminded of it this week whilst I watched footage of two female house sparrows fight for nesting rights (one presumes) in our sparrow/tit camera box.

We, as dull-sensed, blinkered humans, don't get to see, let alone appreciate, this sort of behaviour very often. I mean... this was a REAL battle in the box. All beak and claws. Nothing gentle about this at all. Very much red in tooth and claw.]

Many humans tend to anthropomorphise other creatures in Kingdom Animalia - or worse, "Disney-fy" them.

Some people see a hedge-full of sparrows and think they're all "friends".  (Social media is FULL of this sort of stuff - and sometimes I wonder if it's peculiarly British, or American too perhaps?).

Then, I suppose, there is "bird song".

I know, some "bird song" is lovely to listen to - most "song birds" have "songs" that yes... relax us. 

But "songs" they are not.

Not really.  

Not even music.

And for the birds themselves, these "songs" are FAR from "relaxing".

Imagine as a human, if you will, walking through a town or village (or worse still... a city)  at dawn. Or dusk. All the town's men (and some women too) of breeding age (so what... from 16 (ish) to 50 (ish)) are sitting on lamp-posts or walls or on tree branches, or on roofs or leaning out of their cars parked outside their houses or flats, or for that matter flinging their house windows open.

All have megaphones, or loud hailers. Or microphones attached to amplifiers.

And ALL are shouting at the top of the voice, about the HUGE SIZE OF THEIR GENITALS.

And how if you dare look at them or even start to approach them, they'll KILL YOU.

Unless you're a breeding-age woman of course. And up for breeding.

And they do this over and over and over again. For HOURS. For days. And weeks. And months.

As LOUDLY as they can.

 

That.

Is exactly what our "song birds" are "singing".

 

 

So... the next time you're wandering through a lovely meadow of flowers and you marvel at the musical trilling of a male skylark high in the blue sky above you, consider the FACT that the foppish little twit is actually shouting as loudly as he can - that he has a MASSIVE WILLY! A MASSIVE WILLY! A MASSIVE MASSIVE MASSIVE MASSIVE WILL WILL WILL WILL WILL WILLYYYYYY.  (Also that he is the biggest, best-looking of all the birds and he will beat the proverbial out of anything and anyone that says different).

Same for that song thrush sitting on your rooftop TV aerial at dawn.

And even that nightingale "singing" with CUT GLASS clarity from inside that bush on your dawn dog walk on a May morning.


I wonder if you'll ever hear bird song in the same way as you used to....

 

 

 

 

 

______________

 

Footnote.

I do appreciate that most birds don't have willies, by the way, but instead, cloacae.

But "I have a massive cloaca!"  (or a "lovely tiny cloaca" for that matter) didn't sound right to me, when I started writing this blog post.

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bird song house sparrow sparrow https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/12/the-selfish-gene-and-huge-genitals Tue, 08 Dec 2020 17:37:38 GMT
Avian squabbles. On film. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/12/avian-squabbles-on-film Last week I briefly wrote about the return to our sparrow/tit camera box of our old (very old now) friend, our winter-roosting male great tit.

By now I would have expected it to have spent a week of nights with us in his customary winter retreat.

Alas no though.

The next morning (26th of November) after our male great tit had spent its first night of the season in its box and returned briefly in the morning after - the box was furiously defended by a female house sparrow (who had, to be fair, been  revisiting and nosing around the box during recent days after actually nesting in it last Spring).

You'll see in the clip above that our male great tit beats a hasty retreat from the box. It actually hasn't been back since.

You'll also note in the clip above that the aggressive defender, the female house sparrow spends a little time fighting off another visitor after she's seen off the male great tit.

At the time I speculated that this bird was probably a male house sparrow (you can hear it if you listen carefully, even if you can't see it in the clip above).

Well... a day later and the female house sparrow again fought and chased off what I'm pretty certain now is a male house sparrow (the thumbnail to the video below on YouTube should confirm that to you if you're at first unconvinced).

In the clip below then, the first bird sitting in the box is a MALE sparrow. He's quickly seen off by an angry female.

No. I have no real idea what is going on here. I could speculate I suppose and suggest that the female sparrow is staking an early claim to her old nest site. She probably wants it to herself for now - certainly no great tits roosting it in over the winter and excitable males (sparrows) can probably take a hike for now too.

All this would indeed be speculation though. (I was of the opinion before last week that it was the MALES that reclaimed territories and nest sites each winter or early spring and it was therefore the MALES that defended the territories and sites and persuaded the females to (re?)join them when ready in Spring. I guess that may be wrong.

We'll keep the camera running - and the DVR recording - and see what happens as the weather gets worse.

Will our male great tit return?

Will the female house sparrow start roosting in the box overnight?

Will a male house sparrow do so instead (like last year)?

Time will tell...

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) camera box great tit house sparrow nest box https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/12/avian-squabbles-on-film Tue, 01 Dec 2020 12:10:12 GMT
The return of a (very) old friend. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/the-return-of-a-very-old-friend We've had a great tit use our tit/sparrow camera box as a winter roost, each winter since 2016/2017.

It returned in the winter of 2017/2018.

And again in 2018/2019.

And again last winter, in 2019/2020.

And at the end of each winter, I naturally assume  (what... I'm a realist not a Disney-ist!) it will sooner-or-later die at some point during the breeding season (or shortly afterwards) and sadly not return the following winter to roost with us again.

Great tits on average will live around three years, after all... even if they can, at best, make ten.

There had been no return yet, this November, so I confidently told the family that our wee friend had probably died (at last) during the year - and wouldn't be back this winter.

Then this (below) happened this afternoon at dusk...

 

I've got a few cameras now hooked up to a hard drive CCTV DVR system which record movement  -  and as I was watching the news in the sitting room, Ben bounded in and said "THERE'S SOMETHING SLEEPING IN ONE OF THE BOXES!!!"

We ran back into the conservatory (where the TV monitor and CCTV DVR system is) and sure enough - our tit was back!

Now.

I should point out I suppose, that I'm pretty confident the great tit that is now spending a 5th winter with us is the same bird that has spent the last 4 winters roosting on the north face wall of of our mountain house, under the eaves.

How can I be sure?

Well... I can't be "sure", but I'd put some money on it.

You see (and I know you know this about me) I am pretty "up" on what animals are to be found in and around our garden in any given week. Birds especially.

We've been here for 9 years now and I've NEVER seen great tits around the house, or house box, other than one great tit roost with us over the last 4 winters.

Sure... it could be that it's a different individual of the same species that I've not ever seen near the house or camera bird box, other than during the winter at roost time - but the chances of that being the case are pretty low I'd say.

Nope.

This is the same bird as the bird that found the box in the late Autumn of 2016 and therefore if it makes it to May 2021, our great tit will be AT LEAST 5 years old.

And that's a grand old age for such a bird. (As I've already stated, great tits live around 3 years on average... but can make it to 10 or so years old - in extreme circumstances).

So.... we're all rather happy here this evening - welcoming our old bird back for the winter.

This year though, he (or she) has brought back to the box, for the first time that I've seen, a considerable cargo of hen fleas  (Ceratophyllus gallinae).

Ben and I watched these hen fleas bounce around the box from our handykam camera screwed into the roof of the box. They didn't stay long off the tit - jumping back into the downy feathers pretty quickly. If you're as eagle-eyed as me (and YouTube) hasn't compressed the video clip above, you may see a flea at the top of the box, very briefly).

Reminds me of when I cleared out the starling nest space in the eaves and got COVERED in fleas for my trouble.


Anyway.

Thought I'd let you know about our returning old friend tonight.

Another 4 or 5 winters with us and it might well be a record-breaking tit.

Cross your fingers...

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) great tit hen flea https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/the-return-of-a-very-old-friend Wed, 25 Nov 2020 20:27:32 GMT
Black and white. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/black-and-white

My eldest boy and I went out to see a white bird at dawn this morning. A barn owl.

But we saw it not.

We didn't see much bird life to be honest because -

what we did see was a beautifully-foggy dawn.

And a black bird.

A raven.

Cronking high over our heads and high over the fog.

A first for me away from the coast and a first for my eldest (that he'll remember anyway (he has seen some ravens on the Isle of Wight but he was only 4 or 5 at the time and he doesn't remember that).

We had a lovely walk around our foggy local countryside this morning (listening to tawny owls, grey partridge and redwing in the gloom).

A few photos I took at the time can be seen above and below.

Perhaps I should have made the photos black and white (the conditions certainly would have made monochrome photos suitable)?

Perhaps not.

You decide.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) raven https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/black-and-white Sun, 22 Nov 2020 12:26:31 GMT
An avian SITREP. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/an-avian-sitrep A few feathery notes, whilst I have a few minutes spare...

 

A) I found a dead greenfinch on the roof of our chicken coop, in our chicken run, yesterday.

Now, I should perhaps point out that we've not kept hens for a couple of years now, so the covered run (in which the coop sits) is empty - but wee birds can get in and out (as the walls of the run are covered in chicken wire).

The finch was an adult female greenfinch and looked in pretty good nick other than she was lying on her back with her eyes closed.

As I said to my wife and eldest boy - it's not often you happen across dead passerines just lying around - as they tend to be snaffled up by passing foxes, badgers, cats, rats, squirrels, crows, kites, buzzards, dogs, what have you. Of course in the case of this greenfinch, nothing could get into the run to carry off this free meal. I think it had been lying on the roof of the coop (UNDER the roof of the run) for a day - perhaps two. That's all.

 

B) Me and my eldest boy went for a dusk walk last night  - and as well as seeing our favourite local barn owl (how lucky are we to have these birds so close to us), we also saw SIXTY-SEVEN grey partridge in two "super coveys" of 22 and 45. What an incredible find that was.

Again, as I explained to my boy on hearing these (quite noisy) partridges about half a mile away from the field they were squabbling in, in order to see birds you very often need to rely on your EARS first, rather than just your eyes. We followed the sound and eventually got to see these birds flying low into a very dark field.

These partridge flew into this particular field at dusk and even through my super-duper (at light gathering) binoculars, no details on the birds could be made out OTHER than the dark horseshoes on the males' chests.

I've probably only seen a couple of handfuls of grey partridge in my life until last night, in two small coveys  - one of which in a neighbouring field as it happens. Coveys of grey partridge usually consist of around 6-8 birds, so to see two SUPER COVEYS of 22 and 45 is almost unheard of. It's like seeing a dozen or fifteen or so jays in an oak tree. Just doesn't happen.

 

C) Finally - I'm testing a new Defender CCTV system in several bird boxes around the house at present. My old pals at Handykam sold it to me a week or so ago - and at present I think it's just what the doctor ordered.

I bought it mainly to perhaps record swifts in our attic space after this year's partial success and thought I'd test it on a few boxes over the winter. So far it's passing the test with flying colours.

I've set it to start recording (on its hard drive) any motion in the swift attic space, the blue tit box, the cedar swift box and the hedgehog tunnel.

And over the weekend its picked up a wren visiting the cedar swift box (bet that doesn't happen again in a while) and a blue tit exploring the very cobwebby blue tit / sparrow box. (The hedgehogs were around up until about ten nights ago so I assume they've moved on or hibernated).

Yup. At present I'm very happy with my motion-activated cameras and hard drive and even though I've probably got the compression all-messed-up in the brief YouTube test video below (technical details for nerds like me are in the video description on YouTube), I think this system may become very useful in the Spring.

More soon perhaps.

TBR.

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl blue tit grey partridge wren https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/an-avian-sitrep Mon, 09 Nov 2020 17:13:33 GMT
Burnham beeches. Don't. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/burnham-beeches-dont A little tip today, grapple fans.

If you're thinking of visiting Burnham beeches at this time (you know... to marvel at the colours of the trees), I'd advise you to give it a miss this year.

We went this morning and wished we hadn't.

The woods are completely PACKED with people (we're talking thousands... and no... I'm not exaggerating) and we don't think we've seen the famous beeches look less colourful this November, than any Novembers gone.

Up to you though of course. 

But if you do go, and are exasperated by the crowds and crowds of people meeting other households in the woods as some sort of anti-lockdown activity (yup... that behaviour was obvious and RIFE there today) and are also disappointed by the dull beeches this Autumn, then don't say I didn't warn you.

The below is the one tree in the woods I think merited a (poor) photo today.

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Autumn beech Burnham beeches colour https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/11/burnham-beeches-dont Sun, 08 Nov 2020 13:00:28 GMT
You say comaytus. I say comartus. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/you-say-comaytus-i-say-comartus A wee post today to doff my cap to our annual Coprinus comatus, or "Shaggy ink cap" or "lawyer's wig" that pushes up through the front lawn each October.

They never last long these fun fungi - and although (allegedly) delicious, if you were to leave one on a plate in the kitchen overnight in readiness for breakfast, you'd come downstairs to a small puddle of ink in the morning and that's all. Once they've produced a fruiting body, they basically drop their black spores (the ink) and then melt away to nothing in hours.

Our Coprinus comatus has already all-but-disappeared back into its subterranean mycelium for another eleven months, but before it "melted away" - I managed to show Ben its ink - and I rather th-ink this "shaggy mane" has now become his favourite mushroom.

Not a bad choice I'd say.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) 2020 Berkshire Coprinus comatus fungus lawn lawyer's wig shaggy ink cap shaggy mane https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/you-say-comaytus-i-say-comartus Sat, 31 Oct 2020 09:00:00 GMT
A secret in the night. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/a-nightly-secret-in-the-garden T'other day I was on the turbo trainer in the garden and again I noticed something about the mock orange bush we have at the back of the back garden.

Yes... my eyes weren't deceiving me - the lower leaves of our Philadephus were spattered in bird lime.

Something was probably roosting in our mock orange each night. 

(I was thinking of a small passerine, grapple fans, not a bleedin' EAGLE or something).

So I took my wee camera up to the bush last night and a torch - to see what I could see.

The resulting video is below.

But before you watch it - have a guess.

Do I find anything - and if so.... WHAT?

A clue you say?

OK then.

There was something ORANGE in our MOCK ORANGE.

NB.

I don't recommend shining a torch into something's eyes at night (ESPECIALLY not something nocturnal like an owl or hedgehog).

Luckily for me, this particular animal wasn't *too* disturbed by my nocturnal investigations. It actually stayed put after I made a hasty retreat at the end of the video, realising I'd disturbed it. It's back again tonight - and I used a red LED head torch tonight to ensure I didn't disturb it.

Phew.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Erithacus rubecula mock orange mystery rooster philadephus https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/a-nightly-secret-in-the-garden Wed, 28 Oct 2020 20:15:00 GMT
2020. The strangest summer of all. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/2020-the-strangest-summer-of-all We're all a bit low right now, what with CoVid-19, Brexit and to rub a few grains of salt into those gaping wounds, the end of British Summer Time this morning.

So.

A photographic blog post, containing 30 or so images which I took on our walks around the area, between May and August (only) this year.

Some of these you may have seen on this site before.

Many you won't have.

Hover your cursor over an image to get a caption and click on an image to dim the light.

 

I hope you enjoy looking at them - roll on Summer 2021, eh?

TBR.

Grey squirrel in Great Spotted Woodpecker's holeGrey squirrel in Great Spotted Woodpecker's hole. 20th May 2020. 06:24hrs Beautiful demoiselleBeautiful demoiselle by the back garden pond. 26th May 2020. 14:25hrs

Female house sparrow feeding young in nest boxFemale house sparrow feeding young in nest box. North wall of the house. 27th May 2020. 17:20hrs Pyramidal Orchid among OaksPyramidal Orchid among Oaks. Bracknell industrial estate. 31st May 2020. 09:25hrs I've got a brand new...Combine Harvester, Sileage field. Buzzard, Ben and Kites. 1st June 2020. 16:12hrs. Ben and Daisies.Ben in Frost Folly Meadow. 9th June 2020. 15:53hrs.

Empress.A female Emperor dragonfly ovipositing (egg-laying) in a pond in Frost Folly meadow. 9th June 2020. 16:03hrs The Ox-eye familyOur boys, Ben and Finn, walking through the daisies at Frost Folly Meadow, 6th June 2020. 16:23hrs. Possibly my favourite photo of the year.

Grey HeronGrey Heron at Farleymoor lake, Bracknell. 11th June 2020. 08:53hrs Hornet MothA female hornet moth emerges from the exposed roots of our largest black poplar in the back garden. 21st June 2020. 12:52hrs Grange FarmGrange Farm, between Widmer End and Hazlemere (Buckinghamshire). Where I spent A LOT of my childhood free time, watching badgers, little owls, yellowhammers etc. I've even climbed the radio mast in this photo. 23rd June 2020. 11:53hrs. The best.Swifts alighting in our attic nest space. 24th June 2020. Photo is a merging of 30 or so photos taken between 15:00hrs and 16:00hrs.

Frost Folly Flowers.My eldest boy Ben's composition idea. My photograph. 25th June 2020. 09:56hrs

Young WhitethroatYoung whitethroat calling for an adult to feed it. In the stubble at Frost Folly Meadow, 25th June 2020 11:19hrs

Swift alighting3 photos merged into one of our boldest young (yearling I think) swift alighting in my attic nest space on 25th June 2020. 18:38hrs. Billingbear Park Golf ClubBillingbear Park Golf Club in very photogenic light. 28th June 2020. 18:43hrs SWARM!A honeybee swarm outside the 3M HQ in a Bracknell industrial estate on 7th July 2020 at 11:13hrs. Poplar hawkmoths mating.Poplar hawkmoths mating on a tree in our back garden on 12th July 2020 at 07:26hrs Slow wormMoving across a pavement in a Bracknell industrial estate. 13th July 2020. 11:49hrs Female kestrelOn barn owl post. Garth Meadows, Bracknell. 16th July 2020. 08:58hrs Frog and Lily.Frog and Lily in the back garden pond this summer. 18th July 2020. 14:20hrs Three bees.Two male buff-tail bumblebees fighting over a queen. On the London road (pavement), Bracknell. 19th July 2020. 12:51hrs Dawn.Dawn (ish) at Garth Meadows, Bracknell. 22nd July 2020. 06:02 Oxpecker?Starling on cows. Garth Meadows. 22nd July 2020. 06:07hrs SwallowsSwallows at the river Kennet, Calcot, Berkshire. 9th August 2020. 10:44hrs Kennet chub.River Kennet chub, surface feeding. 9th August 2020. 12:14hrs. King of the castle.Grey Heron at the river Kennet, Theale. 9th August 2020. 12:31hrs Finn in paddling poolBack garden fun during another "heatwave". 10th August 2020. 14:11hrs Ben in paddling pool.Fun in the back garden during one of the 2020 "heatwaves". 10th August 2020. 14:48hrs

"Eating out to help out?""Tea" at the Cricketers (pub), Warfield. 10th August 2020. 17:05hrs.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Summer 2020 https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/2020-the-strangest-summer-of-all Sun, 25 Oct 2020 17:45:00 GMT
You think I'm harsh? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/you-think-im-harsh Someone suggested to me yesterday that my opinion (here) of the winning image in this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition might have been a little harsh. A tad unfair?

Perhaps.

I stand by it though.

I think that if camera trap images are to be allowed in WPOTY, then put them all in their own category. You could call it the errr.... "camera trap category" if you like (you can have that for free).

But I don't think the grand winner of the most prestigious wildlife photography competition in the world should be picked from the "camera trap" category.

 

So then. A few (more) explanatory notes for you, which might explain my itchiness at awarding this particular image (good though it is) the grand title...

 

 

I see in the accompanying blurb to the image, the photographer allegedly scoured the Siberian forests for ten months, in a bid to find the best place to leave his camera trap (note the singular nouns here... place and camera trap, not places nor traps).

 

Then look at the photo below, of Serge, the photographer, setting up his camera traps. (Plural).

There are 6 camera traps in this photo. And these are the ones that we can see. There may be more.

"He (the photographer, Serge) knew his chances of photographing one (a tiger) were slim..." 

Really?

I'd suggest his chances were actually pretty high, considering he had multiple camera traps to work with, in a national park (admittedly a HUGE national park) that is well researched and documented (in terms of Amur tiger and leopard movements - the rangers KNOW how many cats are in the park and where they are often likely to be - in fact I'm sure (I can't (re)find the link right now) that the tigress he photographed is named and numbered. The rangers know them).

Now.

Each camera trap set up (that's EACH ONE) would cost the average punter c.£3500 here in the UK.

The £3500 would be made up of a  £2500 Nikon Z7 camera, a  £200 50mm 1.8 lens and a fully functioning £600 quick release, powered, hooded scout cam box, plus various SD or CF cards and batteries etc.

Serge has six in the shot above.

So that's £21,000 of kit right there in that photo above, laydeez and gennelmen. (Although admittedly for 6 cameras, that's pretty cheap these days!).

Which he will leave in 6 places (I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt here and limiting his arsenal to 6 cameras although he may have more) to try and get the money shot that he wants. And if he failed at those six places, then he'd try another 6. Etc etc etc. He'd have the rangers' experience to draw from, to find places to leave his cameras. As well as his own, of course. But remember, the rangers have numbered these cats. They know them.

And then, after all that... he'd be reliant on the light being just right (unless he uses  expensive wireless flashes too) to get the photo(s) he wanted as the big cat took its own photo when it broke one of the infra red trigger beams.

 

OK.

To summarise.

I think the photo is perfectly fine.

Quite lovely.

Another commentator suggested the power behind the image was in the fact that it made the onlooker desperate to save the world's wildernesses and the wonderful wildlife in those places.

Yup.

MOST wildlife photos make me think that!

But to have it win and perhaps to suggest it took REAL skill and fieldcraft and god-like patience and then finally, swiftness of technical finger out in the field, with just one millisecond-long chance to get it right (like many wildlife encounters with camera)?

No.

Not for me, I'm afraid.

 

 

 

OK.

Enough of the negativity. I know I'm barking up the wrong tree (pardon the pun) with trying to tell the UK public that a photo of a furry tiger hugging a tree isn't "all that".

You love it and that's fine of course.

I don't. That's fine too.

I'll toddle off now and promise you that the next blog post I pen will come around the time the clocks go back - when we all feel a bit down - and will consist of a fair few summery photographs that I took with my wife and boys this summer (often during lockdown).

Maybe that will balance this moany post out and lift our spirits somewhat. I think we may need it this winter...

 

TBR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) WPOTY https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/you-think-im-harsh Thu, 15 Oct 2020 19:08:07 GMT
WPOTY 2020. Oh no. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/wpoty-2020-oh-no Last year, I (reluctantly - I don't enjoy doing so) tore the WPOTY 2019 competition results apart, labelling it as I did, "the worst ever".

This year I actually think I'm equally as disappointed.

It seems as I'm alone though - the winning image of the tiger hugging the tree seems to have been met with universal acclaim.

So.

Why don't I like this year's competition results?

A brief rundown then... if you'll allow.

 

The grand winner.

It's a perfectly-lovely image. Very detailed. Looks like an oil painting (as the judges said). But it was taken by the (known and numbered) tiger (the photographer left a camera trap (a hidden camera ) in place).

I use camera traps to take videos of owls and hedgehogs etc. My camera traps are very cheap Browning camera traps (as opposed to the very expensive infra red trigger boxes housing a several thousand pound camera that professional wildlife photographers use).

Call me an old misery guts - but I don't think camera trap images should win top awards in photography competitions. That's all.

And there are a LOT of camera trap images in this year's WOPTY.

This one. And this one. And this one. And this one. And this one. (I could probably go on... you get the picture (pardon the pun)).

I know, I know... there is a fair amount of skill needed to obtain a really great camera trap image - and an awful lot of time and patience - but if you are eventually reliant on the right light being in place when the camera triggers (the animal breaks the infra red beam) when you are literally miles and/or days away from your hidden camera - then most of the result is down to pure luck and not a lot of skill.

Ah but Doug.... you make your own luck in life eh?

Yeeaaahhhh.... you know what I mean.

So the fact that a lot of winning and highly commended images in this year's competition were taken by the animals themselves, irks me a bit.

Remember the crested macaque copyright saga?

And the disqualified leaping wolf image from 2009 (disqualified for being a model animal... but another camera trap image)?

And as far as the grand winner goes - look it's a lovely photo of an endangered Amur tiger. But that's all. To me anyway.

It doesn't make my heart beat faster. It doesn't shock me. It doesn't show me anything new or interesting. It doesn't repulse me. It's a nice photo of a big furry tiger in a wood, taken by the tiger itself.

And that... for me... isn't good enough to win THE top prize of THE world's most famous wildlife photography competition.

Finally... it's another bloody tiger. Or Lion. Or elephant etc.

There are SO many other FAR more interesting and beautiful forms of wildlife (than big mammals), to take photos of!

 

Other one word critiques of winning or highly commended images.

Dull.

Messy.

Frightened.

Contrived.

 

Look. I'll leave this blog here and return to the WPOTY results page a few times in the coming days to see if I change my mind about this year's results.

 

For what it's worth...

These are my four favourite images, personally.

(And yes... I AM aware that the first... my favourite of all... was also taken effectively by the wasps themselves too, as they broke an infra red camera trigger beam).

Never mind.

TBR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) 2020 WPOTY https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/wpoty-2020-oh-no Wed, 14 Oct 2020 14:12:13 GMT
You talk the talk but fail to walk the walk. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/you-talk-the-talk-but-fail-to-walk-the-walk About two years ago I wrote a blog post which may (I hope) have opened a few peoples' eyes - "Are British garden wildlife lovers HARMING wildlife?".

I'm sure it will have offended a fair few too.

I know, I know.... 2020 has been an exhausting (so far) year hasn't it? - and there are probably far more important things to get flustered by than British garden wildlife lovers demonstrating to me very clearly that they really don't love wildlife at all - they just say they do.

  • They vote Tory and then bemoan the fact that the party they've literally voted into government extend (ad infinitum?) the unscientific and desperately cruel badger cull.
  • They vote for Brexit and then wail and wring their gnarled hands in protest that a lot of the environmental (and food now) protection and standards we currently "enjoy" will be ripped up as we leave the EU  - which again... they literally voted for.... because, well... you know... asylum seekers.
  • They cover their gardens in bird feeders - and never move them nor clean them - ensuring that the avian zoonoses are passed quickly around the local bird populations resulting in many birds (some declining quite worryingly now) such as greenfinches, chaffinches and doves dying slowly from preventable diseases such as trich.
  • They put up bee hotels and  screw them to a fence facing the prevailing weather - and without thinking that the way they've screwed them to the fence will ensure that rain will collect in the larval cells (they've not pointed the hotel slightly downwards (see the photo below of one of my older bee hotels -  it's pointing down deliberately) to allow rainwater to escape.  Then they leave them in situ for year after year after year after year to get covered in fungus and parasites, thus condemning the bees that use these hotels to a particularly unnatural competition just to survive.

Bee hotel (composite)Bee hotel (composite)

  • They dig "wildlife" ponds and fill them with tap water and non native plants. Oh. And fish.
  • They mow their monoculture lawn (a desert to mist wildlife) and imprison hedgehogs in their tellytubby gardens by ensuring bottoms of border fences are impenetrable to newts let alone hedgehogs.
  • They'll happily kill all wasps and bees and hornets nests and any spider anywhere NEAR precious little Timmy and Jemima.

 

I could go on.

 

I don't vote Tory nor did I vote to leave the EU, nor do I feed birds in the garden with bought food (other than monkey nuts for jays sometimes) but I DO provide bee hotels for the non-social bees such as leafcutters and mason bees which I do find absolutely fascinating.

Yup. I wrote that blog post two years ago when I wasn't taking my bee hotels down each autumn to keep them dry and fungus free each winter.

This year though... I've decided to behave far more responsibly (at last). With the actual BEES in mind, rather than just me.

Hotel residentsHotel residents

I've taken all my bee hotels down (many with mason and leafcutter eggs in) and put them in my deserted chicken run for the winter.

Come the spring I will put them all inside a covered, empty water butt, already set up for the purpose, with an exit "hatch" cut into the side of the plastic water butt, so when the bees emerge in the late spring/summer - they can leave the covered water butt but NOT go back to their hotel to lay their own eggs etc - as their old hotel cells will still be at the bottom of the dry, empty, covered water butt - invisible to the new adult bees.

I will of course have screwed NEW hotels to the fence post right by the water butt - where the old hotels were last year.

Everyone with bee hotels should do this.

Everyone who has bee hotels screwed to walls and fences in their garden has a RESPONSIBILITY to do this.

Some may, of course. The tiniest minority.

The vast majority though, will just leave the poor bees to effectively drown or have their cells swamped in fungus or parasites.

All the while proclaiming to their friends and family and internet just how much they LOVE THEIR GARDEN WILDLIFE.

 

Please grapple fans.

If you DO really love your garden wildlife (and there's nothing wrong with that at all of course - far from it) ... then please ACT like you do.

 

  1. Buy (or make?) bird feeders and baths that are very easy to take apart regularly... to thoroughly clean them. With hot water and detergent. If they aren't easy to clean - believe me... before long you simply won't bother cleaning them at all. It takes too long. It's too awkward.
  2. MOVE your bird feeders and baths. REGULARLY. I'm talking every single week.
  3. Don't fill your pond with tap water. 
  4. Don't put fish in a wildlife pond (permanent ponds don't tend to exist outside gardens and if they do (they don't) they certainly don't have fish in them).
  5. Stock your garden with native plants that probably don't look too great - but that's what the wildlife WANTS.
  6. Leave great swathes of your garden (if you're lucky enough to have great swathes!) pretty untidy.
  7. Stay away from the chemicals (roundup and slug pellets etc).
  8. Dig hedgehog holes under your fences
  9. Take your bee hotels down over the winter (as I have done this year - see above) and put up new ones next year.

And finally....

      10. Please be honest enough to admit that you're wildlife gardening as much for yourself as the wildlife you hope to attract.

 

 

Thanks

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) a plea bee hotels garden wildlife lovers UK https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/10/you-talk-the-talk-but-fail-to-walk-the-walk Tue, 13 Oct 2020 19:44:06 GMT
BWPA. 10 years. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/bwpa-10-years Maggie Gowan, the organiser of the British Wildlife Photography Awards since its inception in 2009, wrote to me recently and told me that my (now infamous) photograph of a tabby cat with a blackbird nestling will be featured as part of the  touring "Ten years of BWPA" exhibition.

 

I am, of course, pleased. I took that particular image almost ten years ago now - and remember attending the 2011 BWPA awards ceremony at Alexandra Palace and being somewhat bemused that MY image was the talk of the town that night.

BWPA highly commended 2011 - Tabby cat with nestlingBWPA highly commended 2011 - Tabby cat with nestling

Good photography is more than just taking a snapshot of a moment in time - good photography is ART. And by art, I mean the image provokes a reaction in an onlooker. Often a strong reaction. Whether that reaction is joy or delight or horror or revulsion or intrigue.

My cat and bird image stood out in 2011 among many of the entries and award winners as provoking a VERY strong reaction from all who saw it.

Most people told me (and my wife - who attended the award ceremony with me) that they didn't want to look at my image. But HAD to.

Many photographers will talk of a "power" their image has - I had no need to big that image up, personally.

It shouted.... no....SCREAMED.... LOOK AT ME! YOU DON'T WANT TO. YOU'LL LOOK AWAY.... BUT YOU'LL BE BACK. YOU KNOW IT. I KNOW IT.

I thought BWPA were quite brave to include it as a commended image, but I also think (I wasn't alone, far from it) that it should have won on the night  - at least in its category of "Urban Britain".

It's slightly strange though.

12 years or so ago, when I first started taking photos, I thought my "WHY" photo below, would quickly become and remain the photo I was most associated with.

Why?Why?

Or perhaps even my (unique) shot of a flying white (leucistic not albino) bat. Still unique on the web. Sure... people have taken waaaay better photos of normally-coloured bats, both flying and stationary and they've also taken waaaay better photos of (normally stationary) white bats (often in places like Costa Rica or Honduras or the Philipines) - but no-one, to this day has taken any photo of a FLYING, leucistic (not normally white) bat, other than me. (I think!).

Heavily leucistic batHeavily leucistic bat

Nope. Not to be. My chicken and white bat images were both eclipsed by my tabby cat and nestling shot.

I've neither had the time, nor the inclination over the last 8 years or so to enter any photography award competitions. I expect that fatherhood and various other responsibilities have hammered that home a little more than I perhaps anticipated.

But I am still taking photos. Just not as projects as such.

I do therefore sometimes wonder if I'll ever take a shot that knocks my infamous cat and bird image from its lofty perch.

Hmmmm...

Watch this space....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) art awards bwpa exhibitions images photographs tabby cat and nestling https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/bwpa-10-years Mon, 21 Sep 2020 18:02:00 GMT
Use your eyes. To sex hornets. Instead of watching Strictly? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/use-your-eyes-to-sex-hornets-instead-of-watching-strictly A couple of weeks ago now, Ben and I found a nice big hornets' nest in a hollow tree, on one of our wildlife walks - only the second nest I've ever chanced upon - and the nest presented me with another opportunity to teach my progeny (gawd 'elp 'em) that British wildlife is not to be feared - as long as it's respected.

Hornets for example, won't sting you, unless they feel exceptionally-threatened. (Even then, hornets, (as opposed to wasps), will probably try to bite you first, before using their sting).

We took a few photos and videos and left these beautiful insects to their tree.

Wind the clock on two weeks and I found a dead hornet on a local road (yes... my eyes are that ridiculous) about ten miles away from the nest we found, so I stopped to pick it up and took it home to Ben, so he could get a closer look at it.

Below is a photo of the (pretty mangled, I admit (must have had an argument with a car windscreen I assume)) hornet in question.

But is it a male or a female hornet?

Ben used his eyes (I'll teach him to use his eyes if I teach him nothing else, gawd 'elp 'im again) and confidently told me it was a female hornet.

*Photo of Ben's left eye (taken by me today) is below.*

 

He was correct.

Female hornets have stings (males don't). 

Female hornets have 6 abdominal segments (males have 7).

Female hornets have noticeably shorter antennae consisting of 12 segments (males' antennae are longer and made up of 13 segments).

Straight to the top of the class Ben!

 

OK.

A quick footnote.

Why is any of this important? I mean who GIVES a monkey's .... whether or not a hornet you find is a male or a female?

That's a viewpoint I suppose. An opinion. (Of sorts).

But it's one I don't think I'll ever understand, nor would I particularly want to.

If I see something, pretty-well anything.... I'll want to know what it is, what it's doing there, where has it come from, where is it going, have I seen one before, am I likely to see one again - is it amazing or interesting or weird or rare or beautiful, does it have a fascinating back story or life history, does it make a sound I can recognise if I hear that sound again, what does it smell like even?

You, on the other hand might like to errrm... watch TV?

Strictly come dancing, probably. 

Knowing you.

Hey. Each to their own I guess.

 

With specific regards to hornets though. If you DO learn to differentiate between male and female hornets in the field (easier than it sounds - once you've counted a few abdominal/antennal segments of a few hornets, you do quickly realise they do look quite different, males and females), you'll amaze people with your knowledge and confidence around these animals. You'll intrigue people. You'll interest people. Because.... well... you'll (yourself) be interesting.

So...one day a hornet flies into your house - you'll now be able to tell whether your beautiful visitor is a female with a sting (and best not to pick up gently in your hands to remove from the house) or a male without a sting (easy to pick up gently in a pair of cupped hands to remove). 

'Course. Knowing you... you'll just swat it with a copy of HELLO! Magazine, won't you? And settle back down to Strictly...

If this is you, can I suggest that you might like to watch a rerun of "Extinction, the facts" on BBC i-player, as soon as you can.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hornet use your eyes https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/use-your-eyes-to-sex-hornets-instead-of-watching-strictly Sun, 20 Sep 2020 14:59:21 GMT
Like chuffing clockwork. Unfortunately. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/like-chuffing-clockwork-unfortunately I first (I think) blogged about this in September 2012, a couple of months or so before my eldest boy was born and now, eight years on - I again see we're are being told (by our meteorologists) to expect temperatures getting very near 30 centigrade on Sunday or Monday coming.

  • This Sunday will be the 13th September and the Monday will be the 14th in that case.
  • And as yet, not since the Winter  (Jan, Feb and a lot of March) or early Spring (the rest of March and a bit of April) have we had a "killing frost" in 2020.

 

I mention those two points as, like bleeding clockwork, many people (whether weathermen/women or not) on and off social media and in our gutter press, will be calling the brief period of "heat" next week an....

"INDIAN SUMMER".

Does my chuffing head in, this.

 

Look.

This is easy, everyone.

 

You cannot have an "Indian Summer" IN SUMMER. (Autumn begins this year on Tuesday 22nd September).

You cannot have an "Indian Summer" before the first 'killing frost'. ( I expect that to happen in late October perhaps. Perhaps later than that).

We (yet again, *sighhhhh*) are ticking NO box at all, to call the two or three days of heat at the end of our summer, an "Indian Summer".

 

But that won't stop the lazy dribblers calling Monday an "Indian Summer" anyway.

 

Just please note, good reader, that a far more accurate description of the coming two or three (or more) days of heat at the beginning of next week, would rather than "InDIAN summer" be simply... "INdian summer".

 

*poddles off back under the bridge, muttering to himself* 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Indian summer https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/like-chuffing-clockwork-unfortunately Fri, 11 Sep 2020 07:34:29 GMT
My eldest boy and I are grand mothers. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/my-eldest-boy-and-i-are-grand-mothers I've been meaning to write a mothy post for a wee while now - and as I found a lovely moth caterpillar in the garden today, I thought, well... today might as well be the day I pen a few notes on three species of moths my eldest boy (Ben) and I (errr... me) have found in the garden this year.

We've found more than three species of course... but I'll quickly write about just three species in this post.

 

OK.

First up then.

Our wonderful hornet moths - which I've been waxing lyrical about now, all summer it seems.

Ben and I have been collecting the discarded exuviae of the hornet moths since it became obvious that perhaps a dozen or more moths would emerge from the roots of our largest poplar this summer.

The photos below (taken a few minutes ago - in early September - now that this year's cohort of emerging hornet moths have all definitely emerged (and left)) shows that between us, Ben and I collected TWENTY SIX exuviae (and three cocoons - top right of the photos).

I don't suppose for a second that we found ALL the discarded exuviae of these rather wonderful moths this summer in our garden; I mean, they're often hidden in long clumps of grass or under leaves etc; so I'd guess that perhaps forty or more hornet moths emerged from our poplar trees in our garden this year.

Amazing eh?!

We'll CERTAINLY be on the lookout for these moths next summer. But we won't be driving to a potential site ten miles away. Oh no. We'll just be poddling up the garden in our PJs.

 

 

Now.

Secondly.

The owner of those superb antennae that provided the cover photo for this blog.

Laydeez and gennelmen, may I present to you, a male Gypsy moth. (Yes yes, a bit like Francis Chichester's GIPSY MOTH if you're of a certain age).

Gypsy moth (male)Gypsy moth (male)

The gypsy moth's scientific name of Lymantria dispar literally means "spoiler" or "destroyer"  and "unalike".

This is because this moth is well known as a pest and a defoliator of certain deciduous trees (it can kill the tree if the tree is small) and exhibits sexual dimorphism (the males and females look very different).

Well... Ben and I aren't too bothered about finding a few gypsies in the garden - Ben loved seeing this big male moth with its huge antennae - and has named this, his "long-eared owl moth" as his favourite moth of the year. Each to their own I guess!

 

Finally then. Today's moth.

I finished my static bike session in the garden after work and noticed a caterpillar crawling around the hundreds of bonnet mushrooms that have all appeared overnight around the base of the thick trunk of our biggest poplar.

This is a poplar grey moth caterpillar - we've caught quite a few adults in the moth trap all summer.

The poplar grey (moth) has a pretty poor (if you ask me) scientific name of Acronicta ("nightfall"... but as these moths aren't crepuscular, what Oschenheimer really meant was Noctua) megacephala (big head - of the caterpillar that is, rather than the adult moth).

So... this moth was named the "big headed moth of dusk".

Even though it's larval head isn't really that big and it comes out at NIGHT, not at dusk.

Well... when I become Prime Minister (surely just a matter of a few short months now) - I'll put all this silly scientific naming right, dinna fash yersel.

 

 

Three moths then.

And what they all have in common, other than being moths and Ben and I finding them in our garden this year... is that they all LURVE poplar trees.

A bit like our other HYOWGE mothy highlight from this summer eh?

 

So.

Might I take this opportunity to big-up the humble poplar tree.

Not many peoples' garden tree of choice - but the  wonderful, indicative sound of the leaves rustling in the wind is something you'll never forget if you're sitting under a poplar tree and lots of wildlife just loves black poplar.

 

That's all for now then.

Hope you're well.

And as grand at mothing as my eldest boy and me.

 

More soon.

TBR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) acronicta megacephala gypsy moth hornet moth lymantria dispar poplar grey moth sesia apiformis https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/my-eldest-boy-and-i-are-grand-mothers Thu, 03 Sep 2020 19:03:45 GMT
Noisy blighters. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/noisy-blighters We have noisy hedgehogs... noisier than most (and most are noisy after all).

But recently our hedgehogs... well.... they've been taking the mick as far as I'm concerned... pegging it around our garden of an evening, putting their blues and twos on for no reason.

Taking the mick I say.

See what I mean below.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/9/noisy-blighters Tue, 01 Sep 2020 15:28:01 GMT
33 weeks. 33KG or 73lb or 5.2 stone. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/33-weeks-70lb-32kg-5-stone Not so much a wildlife blog today but a quick blow of my own trumpet (matron) if you'll  briefly allow.

 

On January 9th 2020 (exactly 33 weeks ago), I read THIS blog post from an old pal of mine.

And thought... I'm going to have to use this inspiration and do this myself.

33 weeks ago... I looked like this:

 

Today..... 33 weeks on from that date of 9th January....

I've lost 5.2 stone.

Or 33KG.

Or 73lb.

 

And look like this:

 

(Apologies for the hammer house of horror mug shots  - I don't have many photos of my face for obvious reasons!)

 

Without going into too much detail (this is meant to be a wildlife blog after all) - I achieved this feat of weight loss by counting calories (not really by eating less) and exercising enough so that I would be in a calorie deficit each day.

 

Look... I eat like a ravenous horse, so I've had to do some SERIOUS exercise each day.

There are no shortcuts when you're my age.

You need to move more.

MUCH more.

If you want to pig out that is.

 

And you may want to change a few things in your diet too.

I, for example, have stopped taking sugar in my coffees.

Stopped drinking coffee after noon. 

Stopped having hunks of cheese as a snack.

Stopped having lots and lots of bread as snacks. (I still eat bread mind, I just limit it to a few slices a day).

That's about all I changed in terms of what I actually eat.

 

As for exercise and movement...

I tend, at present, for example, to WALK (not run, walk) at least 7 miles EVERY DAY (not just walking around the house and garden - walking at pace - 3.5 miles an hour through the local area and countryside). So I walk (to WALK only) for two hours every day. Often at dawn. But when I can. Each day.

I also cycle for 25 miles each day. You heard me. TWENTY FIVE MILES. Often on a static bike set at uphill resistance (yes... 25 miles UPHILL!) in the garden but also often through the local forests with my eldest boy.

I also started swimming regularly too last year (a mile at a time) which helped with my mental health and sleep I think - this kicked start this whole lifestyle change this year and got me in the right mental place to really start exercising a lot. I haven't kept up the swimming this year but might start again soon.

I often burn 2000kcal on exercising (just walking at pace and cycling) each day. 

I often tend to eat between 3500kcal and 4000kcal of food each day.

As long as I'm in deficit, I'm OK.

 

Now.

I weigh myself each Thursday and today, for the first time I've hit my target (below 100KG). Yes... I am a big, tall bloke, but I was SERIOUSLY overweight.

I have no doubt I've lost this weight too quickly. (see the graph below). I originally gave myself about 60 weeks to  get to my target weight and have hit target WAAAY too early really.

But I have to admit, I'm rather chuffed with myself.

It's been hard.

The walking has been a pleasure in the main (did a lot in lockdown with my boys) although walking for hours in the driving rain through Bracknell's deserted industrial estates wasn't exactly fun.

I (and my boys) have seen a lot on our walks.

We've seen egrets, herons, kingfishers, peregrines, foxes, deer, toads, terns, orchids, bluebells, ox-eye daisies, barn owls, buzzards, hobbies, cuckoos. And much more. (There... this blog does have some wildlife in it!)

But to be honest, the 80 minute workouts on the bike (static bike especially) haven't been much fun.  At all.

Those sessions have been BRUTAL - and only soundtracks from the Prodigy (in particular) and Portishead have kept me going during those heart-pumping hours.

 

The result?

I've lost 33KG or 73lb or 5.2 stone in 33 weeks.

I've lost about 7 inches around my waist and the same sort of mark around my chest.

I've probably lost around 2 inches from around my neck.

I've had to replace most of my wardrobe and also am considering having my wedding ring size reduced as I'm worried it may just fall off my finger these days!

I also, unbelievably.... have a VO2max of 48 and a Garmin Connect measured fitness age of 20! (That can't be right surely!)

 

Now there may be some people reading this thinking. You're 99KG. And you're celebrating?!!! You're bleeding massive mate - you wanna eat less you know!

Hey... I'm 6 foot 3 and I am built like a brick outhouse - I'm never going to be 70KG. Never am. Never was. I AM one of those people who make the BMI method of ascertaining your healthy weight window to be utterly ridiculous as even when I was 92KG and at "fighting weight" as I used to call it (I was very much in great shape throughout my twenties and early-to-mid thirties) the BMI scale had me down as "overweight". Daft as there was no fat at all on me during those years.

 

Anyway...

That's stage 1 completed then.

Stage 2 is to not be so obsessive about calories, exercise and weight (it's been pretty strict for these past 8 months) but to try and keep these healthy habits (to a lesser degree admittedly) as much as I can to try and stay below 100KG as best I can.

Stage 3 will run alongside stage 2 and involves a little flexibility work and a little strength work, more than just cardio, which is what I have been pretty-well concentrating on for the past 8 months. 25 mile cycle rides for 6 days (at least) a week aren't sustainable to be honest and nor are 8 mile walks. As long as I stay active though... that will be fine. I'm teaching my eldest how to play golf and tennis at present and of course have, post lockdown, restarted coaching the town's U8s rugby team. All that will help I'm sure.

 

Right now.

I feel better.

I think I look better.

My back and hips feel MUCH better.

And despite me being 92KG for most of my adult life (each time I weighed myself in my 20s and early to mid 30s I was 92KG!)... I've not been this light since I left London with my girlfriend at the time (now my wife of course) in 2006. See the photo  (on the "about" page of this website) of Anna and myself in 2006 on the island of Kephalonia - that was me at my standard weight of 92KG... 14 years ago as I write this.

Of course I was working physically back then, and smoking... neither of which I'm doing now (I've not worked physically (for a job) since leaving London and I've been cigarette free for 4 years now, almost to the day).

 

Anyway.

That had better be all the trumpet-blowing I do today.

Stage 1 complete.

Now all I have to do is ensure I don't run out and bury myself in the biggest blackforest gateaux I can and put it all back on.

I didn't feel like I was on a weight-loss diet and exercise regime from the 9th January.

I felt like I was starting a new life, employing a lifestyle change that I could keep up... perhaps for the rest of my life.

Sure, I'll only count calories in my head for now (instead of record them all religiously on an app on the phone) and sure I won't feel the need to cycle 25 miles uphill each day... but I WILL continue the desire to just look after myself and weigh myself regularly to make sure I'm still where I want and need to be.

So again...

Stage 1 complete.

Stages 2 and 3 (see above) start today and finish ... well... when I'm finished.

 

A final message then to my old mate who inspired me back in January.

Thanks pal.

You gave me all the impetus I needed.

Cheers!

 

And a final, (final) message to my long-suffering wife, who has weighed (or helped me weigh) much of my food for me each evening so I could record calories consumed each day and who has also given me the space and time (a LOT of it) to disappear and exercise, sometimes for hours each day.

Thanks honey.

I hope (and think?) you'll agree... the effort was worth it, eh?

I'm back to the size (and shape) when we met in that pub cellar bar in London all those years ago!

Just a little more mileage under the bonnet these days. That's all!

X

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) weight loss https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/33-weeks-70lb-32kg-5-stone Thu, 27 Aug 2020 06:06:30 GMT
The second of two firsts... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/the-second-of-two-firsts Four days ago now (sorry!) I wrote about the first of the two firsts I'd seen this week... a toadflax brocade moth in our moth trap on 10th August. Not only a first (EVER) for me - but also a first for SU87 (our 10KM ordnance survey square).
 

So.

Now to reveal the second first - a bird remember?

In Swinley Forest. (My most favourite local spot - about 3 miles from our house).

 

No. 

Not a nightjar. (Seen them quite a bit locally - they are my second favourite bird after all).

No.

Not a firecrest. (Seen them up Mount Ainos in Kephalonia).

No.

Not a Dartford Warbler. (Still haven't seen one - although I KNOW they do live in the local lowland heaths around Swinley Forest and I'm sure I'll see one eventually).

No.

Not even a woodlark (ditto above).

 

All the above are real local specialists in Swinley Forest - which is a real stronghold for them in this county. But I've left one bird out.

Got it yet?

That's right!

A REDSTART.

 

Now be honest. Did you guess that? Probably not, I'd say.

 

Ben, my eldest and I were exploring the 2600 acres of forest on our mountain bikes when we found ourselves at two of our favourite dragonfly ponds. We stopped, and dismounted from our bikes, as I'd heard a bird call in the canopy that I didn't think I'd heard (EVER) before. (I'm pretty good identifying birds from their calls and couldn't remember this one).

Suddenly not one but two of these birds flew down to the pond, disappeared for a bit then strongly flew back up to the canopy showing me their orange tails (if nothing else really - just LBJs or little brown jobs, but with orange tails). No time for any photos I'm afraid - not this time.

I immediately thought redstart (female or young) but as I'd never seen one before, I couldn't be 100% sure.

But I confirmed it when I got home.

Actually... on that subject (bird identification) - here's an ordered checklist tip for anyone reading this.

 

If you have trouble identifying birds (or any organism for that matter) - the below may help.

 

1) WHAT TIME OF YEAR AND WHAT TIME OF DAY IS IT? SUMMER in the bird's case. (Perfect for our summer visiting redstart). And middle of the day. 

2) WHAT HABITAT ARE YOU IN? Large mixed forest and heath. AND the county stronghold for redstarts.

3) WHAT DOES THE ORGANISM SOUND LIKE (IF IT'S MAKING A NOISE). That call  I'd not heard before.

4) WHAT IS IT DOING? HOW IS IT DOING IT? Incessantly calling then flying down to the ground (from the canopy) to feed. VERY redstart behaviour.

Then and ONLY then... move onto 5 below...

5) WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE? ANY OBVIOUS FEATURES OR COLOURS? Orange tail. That's all I saw really.

Never... repeat NEVER... try to identify anything that you see on its own (that is to say without any other organisms around for comparative purposes by size - a mistake that loads make).

 

The above order for identifying anything you're not sure of (or perhaps have not seen before) is SO important - almost all misidentifications that I've seen people (including friends and even family) make are made because people go to point 5) first and often talk about size too. Schoolboy error.

 

 

Anyway... I'd not seen a redstart before last week. Ben and I have been back twice now (once with my wife too) and we've since seen two more of these lovely but quite secretive birds. And now that I know what they sound like, and where they are... I'm sure I'll see many more in the summers ahead (if we stick around in this area... which we really aren't sure we will).

 

 

Oh.

Whilst I'm here.

This is probably just me... and today I've probably picked trees and views to photograph with confirmation bias....

But aren't the trees dropping their leaves early this year?

I mean it's barely mid August and look at the below (all photos taken this morning on my power walk around east Berks).

Surely this is too early to start sweeping up leaves?

Just me then? Or have YOU noticed this too, this year?

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) redstart https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/the-second-of-two-firsts Sun, 16 Aug 2020 19:02:14 GMT
Just the 46,000 then? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/just-the-46-000-then Before I reveal the second of my two recent firsts (that being the bird (species) that I saw for the very first time (ever) in the Swinley Forest t'other day) -  I thought I'd quickly draw your attention to the below - something I was alerted to by the BTO a few days ago.

 

Please do take the time to watch both short video clips and visit the hyperlink provided - quite the eye openers.

The best birds of all.

By MILES.

And I miss them dreadfully, already.

 

Large movements of Swifts moving east along the south coast of Britain are a well known phenomenon, occurring between mid June and mid July. Counts during these movements can regularly exceed 10,000 birds. The origin of these is unknown, but the general consensus appears to be that the majority of Swifts noted are likely non-breeding adults and immatures.

 

This year a large passage was noted between 27–29 June, especially at sites in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. At least 16,000 Swifts were counted moving south on 28 June, but it was the following day that broke all records with over 46,000 noted at Gibraltar Point, Lincolnshire. The latter count represents a new British record, and video footage from the site gives an impression of the incredible numbers involved.

 


 

Gibraltar Point Common Swift passage from BirdGuides on Vimeo.

 

Gibraltar Point Common Swift passage from BirdGuides on Vimeo.

 

 

 

https://www.birdguides.com/articles/general-birding/a-british-record-day-for-common-swift-passage/?dm_i=NXN,6ZKGW,7TAY69,S5CUC,1
 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/just-the-46-000-then Sat, 15 Aug 2020 18:53:21 GMT
The first of two firsts... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/the-first-of-two-firsts I was originally going to lump in both these reports together. In fact I was going to lump them in with a few other reports, to be honest.

I've given this some thought, though - and I think each of these two "firsts" deserve their own blog entry.

This is the first then, of my two "firsts".

 

Two days ago, on Monday 10th August 2020, I saw two animals locally that I've not seen before. AT ALL. Anywhere.

Tomorrow (or very soon anyway) I'll tell you about the second, which you'll see below, is a bird I saw in Swinley Forest.

But tonight - I'll talk to you about the first first - a moth.

Not only a first for me - but a first for the 10KM square (SU87) that we currently live in - as confirmed by Martin Harvey (the Berkshire moth recorder and biological records guru who kindly confirmed my tentative ID when I asked him to). 

 

I occasionally set up my battered old moth trap (a very weak 15W thing) in the back garden - and have done twice  (or thrice) over this recent heatwave - as my eldest Ben likes to see what moths are around - as does his Daddy, to be fair.

On Monday morning, we realised we had a beaten-up Toadflax brocade (Calophasia lunula) moth in the trap -  on the red database, not at all common in the UK (likes southern coasts and that has been that for some time to be honest ... although Martin Harvey also suggested to me via email when confirming my ID that he had had quite a few reports this year, suggesting the hot spell had been beneficial to their movement north and colonisation around the home counties perhaps?)

The scientific name for the toadflax brocade moth, by the way, is Calophasia (meaning [looks like a piece of] wood) lunula (little moon (from the dorsal half of the postdiscal fascia - lunate shaped , or like a wee moon - see photos below or better still HERE)).

 

Well... after Martin kindly confirmed my ID and also told me that he had never seen one  himself before... I enrolled on i-record and submitted my report. (I also added my report of the bird that I saw for the first time later in the day too).

 

I know our toadflax brocade moth was a little beaten up - but it was a little gem too - and I'm more than a little proud to be the first person to report one in this particular 10KM ordnance survey and therefore biological records square.

OK.

That's the first first then.

I'll reveal what my second first (so to speak) was tomorrow. A bird, remember? In Swinley Forest. 

Have a guess if you like - and I'll reveal all very soon.

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Calophasia lunula firsts toadflax brocade https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/the-first-of-two-firsts Wed, 12 Aug 2020 19:25:15 GMT
Three hedgehogs again? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/three-hedgehogs-again This year I've been keen to establish how many hedgehogs are visiting our gardens again each night - especially as we've had at least one killed on the road last year and also new neighbours move in to a house adjacent to the bottom of the garden who have taken out ALL the cover in their small garden  - a garden which I know the local hedgehogs (and foxes) used to love.

I've not put my best trail camera out much this summer though. (In the garden that is, to see whagwan). But I did last night. I positioned it near the house, pointing towards the hedgehog food bowl hidden behind a water butt and a pile of junk basically that prevents foxes and cats stealing the hedgehog food (I know it looks like a mess, this hedgehog food "den" behind the water butt - but it serves a purpose, and it's not like we've had many human visitors in 2020 to show off our errr... pristine patio to, eh?).

The short video of four clips spliced together can be seen below.

In summary:

12:27am. Hedgehog 1 (white)  with a noticeably pale (marked or scuffed) arse. Ignores food behind water butt. Leaves through tunnel under door.

 

02:01am Hedgehog 2 (black)  no pale arse. Deliberately ignores food behind water butt. Leaves through tunnel door - and more importantly the sensitive trail camera does NOT pick up its return over the patio. There is NO other quick way back into the back garden other than back under the door again and through the side passage. Any other return would involve a trip around the block and through at least three neighbouring gardens (I'd estimate quarter of a mile trip and well over an hour ... even for a hedgehog not stopping much to feed at all).

 

02:51am Hedgehog 3? (Yellow). Look. This COULD be hedgehog 2 again (no pale arse), but for that to be the case, why is was its about turn by the door and return over the patio NOT picked up by this very sensitive trail camera and why did it deliberately ignore the food at 02:01 only to clearly and deliberately head straight to the food 50 minutes later and eat for five minutes. No... I'd say the chances are overwhelmingly in favour of this being a third hedgehog then.

 

02:56am Hedgehog 3? (Yellow). Finishes eating and leaves under side door tunnel like hedgehogs 1 and 2 before.

Hmmm.

Have we, at present, got three "snufflers" each night? 

You decide.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/8/three-hedgehogs-again Wed, 05 Aug 2020 06:48:13 GMT
Neowise was NO Hale-Bopp. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/neowise-was-no-hale-bopp Mars, Saturn, Milky Way, Jupiter from the Isle of Wight.Mars, Saturn, Milky Way, Jupiter from the Isle of Wight.

Let me take you back 23 odd years.

To 1997.

(I know... that was indeed almost a quarter of a century ago now. Ridiculous, eh?)

Before Brexit.

Before Covid-19.

Before Trump. (Bill Clinton began his 2nd term in 1997).

Before Boris Johnson. (Tony Blair won a landslide in 1997 remember?)

A gurt big comet hung in the night sky for over a year during 1996 and 1997 as you may well, like me, remember. It became part of the nocturnal furniture as far I was concerned, as it hung above my three-floor flat, during my hard-drinking, hard-smoking and hard-partying time of my life (I was a bachelor bakery manager at the time, without wife, kids, mortgage or any responsibilities to be honest - and so enjoyably lived life virtually feral).

But even through the beery-haze of the 1990s, I remember comet Hale-Bopp.

Back then though, I had no camera and wasn't therefore taking any photos of anything.

In fact, back in 1997, I'm pretty sure I didn't even have a mobile phone - let alone a "smart phone".  I think I got my first mobile phone in 1999 in case you want to know. And I "got" my first email address a couple of years later I think.  (I genuinely wish we could go back to a time without emails and mobile phones by the way... I DREAM of starting work of a day WITHOUT logging on and sighing at another load of blessed emails).

 

Anyway... I do remember Hale-Bopp and AM interested in comets and eclipses and moon phases and space stations and meteor showers.

And I DO have a camera now.

And I have some experience of taking photos of the night sky (see above - the milky way, Mars, Saturn and Jupiter (can you spot them all?) taken from the south coast of the Isle of Wight).

 

So... I went out at 2230hrs last night, to take a few photos of the stunning comet Neowise, that I've been reading so much about and seeing images of, everywhere.

 

Well.

The two photos I got are below.

Have a look at them.... and see if you can spot the spectacular comet Neowise. It's in BOTH shots by the way.

Having trouble seeing the SPECTACULAR comet Neowise?

Yes... so was I last night.

I was very disappointed to be honest - Hale-Bopp was truly SPECTACULAR - but Neowise well... just isn't, even if, in its defence, it is almost faded beyond visibility now as it heads towards the sun.

Scroll down to the end of this post to see the images above again, only this time with the comet pointed out and enlarged.

Anyway... even though I'm glad I saw it (and to some extent glad I took a photo of it), no....

Neowise is no Hale-Bopp.


TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) comet comet Neowise neowise https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/neowise-was-no-hale-bopp Fri, 31 Jul 2020 16:12:15 GMT
The lucky ones. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/the-lucky-ones  

Many people (retailers generally) would try to have us believe that Christmas is "the most wonderful time of the year", but I'm afraid I've always disagreed. Christmas for me is the worst time of the year. Always has been. Well... since my late mother was  (typically, I'm afraid) kind enough to tell me on one Christmas eve in the early '80s (perhaps 1981, I can't quite remember) that she was splitting up from my father, who, at the time, I think, like most young boys, I probably worshipped. 

No. Christmases for me were days spent with people I probably didn't want to spend time with, in areas of the country I probably didn't want to be in, sat in clothes I certainly didn't want to be dressed in, often eating food I really didn't want to eat, on the shortest, darkest, wettest, coldest days of the year.

Then of course, since the early '80s (for me at least) there has been the constant pressure to bankrupt oneself buying people expensive presents. I could tell you some (all-too-true) heart-breaking stories of (again my mother in particular) being pretty nasty to me on unwrapping her Christmas present from me - often bought with paper round money I'd earned for months. 

Ready to swing from the nearest oak yet?

Well... this specific, current time of year for me runs Christmas a pretty close second, for being the worst time of the year.

The fourth week of July.

When my beautiful swifts abandon me.

For nine long months.

 

I absolutely HATE it when the best birds of all leave our skies - skies that seem so noisily-full of life on one day in July can feel SO empty the next.

I'm reminded on these days (and evenings in particular) why swifts are so amazing - and to me at least, make all other birds look second or third rate.

To me, there are swifts. And then there are ALL other birds.

I try not to be too besotted or obsessed with any one thing in life - but I'm afraid that principle is shattered as far as I'm concerned, with swifts. I fully admit I'm completely besotted with these birds  - and I suffer for some time at the end of July, when I watch them (as I ALWAYS do) leave.

This year I became acutely aware that they were "orf" last Thursday evening, when the regular evening screaming laps around the house felt very different and brief and on Friday evening I watched dozens head south, high above the house, with only one or two low sorties and screams at our house.

My wife saw a swift yesterday and has done again today (I've been a little busy) and I'm sure I'll see a few before the first week of September (September 5th is the latest I've EVER seen one in Berkshire) but for now, around the house, the skies seem horribly empty - and will feel like that to me, until early May next year.

 

On the flip side though - and this large, black cloud does have a silver lining.... we've had the best year ever at new "Swift Half" for swift visits. Since late May and certainly early June we've had swifts visit the house every day, sometimes all day - and for the first season ever, we've had at least one swift actually enter and explore the attic roof space I've created for them and have been hoping to attract them to (to breed) for almost ten years now (as regular readers of this blog will appreciate).

I think those explorers were 2nd year birds so may (if they survive the trip to and from the Congo this and next year) do a dry-run nesting attempt next year with us if we're incredibly lucky - and if they manage that and survive another year, then (and only then) will they actually breed properly in our attic.

But... they may not survive that long. And they may have found somewhere else anyway. And remember, we had visitors to our attic space (or at least the tunnel TO our attic space) in the heatwave of 2018 too - and yet we had basically NOTHING last year.

So... who knows?

My hope has been reignited after this fantastic swift year here - and perhaps that is why I'm feeling even sadder than normal for the 4th week of July - because the skies around the house this year have indeed been so full and noisy (screams of up to half a dozen swifts for WEEKS now), that suddenly now, it really does feel so bloody quiet and empty.

Maybe it's that, as well as 2020 being just a bleeding awful year all round - what with CoVid19 and Brexit, not to mention the bleeding clowns in charge of our government at present.

Anna and I are SERIOUSLY considering our futures right now and whether we even HAVE a future in this shameful country of thick, selfish, deluded, arrogant, nasty, racist charlatans and liars. (NB - that's just England I'm talking about - not the UK as a whole).

I honestly wish that I could leave with the swifts right now!

This feeling won't last too long I'm sure. Well... I hope not. But right now, silly as it seems, I need to be kind to myself. In about two weeks I won't have smoked a cigarette in FOUR YEARS. And for the first time in years, I really missed sitting in the garden with a beer and a ciggy, toasting the departure of my swifts. 

Oh look... I'm not going to take up smoking again and I'm not going to hit the bottle nor comfort eat (I've worked very hard and lost nearly five stone since January and am thoroughly enjoying being my old shape again) ...but I am going to make time to do a few things I enjoy over the next couple of weeks - just to get over this most acute of annual mental slumps, this particular year.

 

 

Finally then.

God speed to all the beautiful, amazing swifts leaving our shores now or very soon.

Be safe.

And I will see you again next May....

 

 

 

***

 

I took the photo below of our swifts leaving us last Thursday evening - you might also want to consider playing the YouTube clip below,

"Lucky ones by Luttrell (Leaving Laurel remix)" as this is the music I listen to when the swifts leave us.

It will also be the music I'll listen to when (and it will be a 'when', not an 'if') they return next May.

 

The lucky ones, that is.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/the-lucky-ones Sun, 26 Jul 2020 14:58:02 GMT
More hornet clearwing moths. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/more-hornet-clearwing-moths I think that Ben (my eldest son) and I have between us, found about fifteen pupal exuviae and/or mud casings that surrounded the exuviae of emerging hornet clearwing moths this summer, around our largest black poplar - and we have between us, found three adult moths whilst they've been emerging.

Lovely wee beasties - and the latest, yesterday, I filmed and photographed in detail (see photos and extended video clip below).

Hornet (clearwing) mothHornet (clearwing) moth Hornet (clearwing) mothHornet (clearwing) moth Hornet (clearwing) mothHornet (clearwing) moth

I should point out that in the video below, I slow the moment of first lift-off of this hornet clearwing down to 5% speed and write that it will make it sound like a helicopter. As it DID when I edited the video. That said, I must have ticked the "no sound" box in that particular clip for the finished, edited video, so in the video below, that slowed-down clip is silent I'm afraid and doesn't actually sound like a helicopter. You'll just have to take my word for it, that when you DO slow down the video (and sound) of a flying hornet moth - it really does sound like a "WOP WOP WOP" helicopter.  Honest!

I keep saying to Ben that I really don't think we can expect to see any more emerge now - as it is late July after all. But who knows? We're still checking each morning and will do I think, until August arrives...

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) 2020 Berkshire black garden hornet clearwing hornet clearwing moth hornet moth July poplar Sesia apiformis UK https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/more-hornet-clearwing-moths Wed, 22 Jul 2020 13:57:41 GMT
370 days. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/370-days A year ago (almost exactly), you may remember that I blogged about a leaf-cutter bee nesting in our side-passage wall outside the kitchen.

That was July 9th, 2019.

On July 14th, 2020, one of the bees (possibly the only one) that spent the winter in its drill hole in our masonry, sealed in by its mother, with a locked, leafy door, emerged.

I admit I didn't see it emerge - but I did notice the hole it had made on emerging.

370 (full) days it had been in that hole.

As an egg. And a larva. And finally emerged as an adult.

Circle complete.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) brick hole leaf-cutter bee megachile wall https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/370-days Mon, 20 Jul 2020 12:57:00 GMT
Now that's a first! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/now-thats-a-first As we get to the last week or so of swift activity around the new "Swift Half" and I become genuinely inconsolable for a wee while because of this inevitability each year - something of a surprise this morning and most certainly a first.

As is the way, these days, I tend to try and find time to complete a seven mile walk around the area, at some point, every day. Often I'm with my two boys but sometimes I'm on my own (at weekends generally). 

This morning, my seven mile walk was a solo affair - and began at 0645am.

As I walked alongside a thick(ish), tall hawthorn hedge, running down a lane which bordered a very large school field (which used to be my local golf course up until a few years ago), I noticed something about 8 foot off the ground, in this hedge. Something organic. Something that looked like one of those toy rubber chickens or perhaps a baby wryneck. All stretched out and elongated... and motionless.

Unlike one of those toy, rubber chickens though, this thing had feathers - feathers indicating it was a moorhen (the feathers were grey in the main, but the moorhen's white "petticoat" feathers were clearly visible.

Now... this hedge is NOWHERE NEAR any water - and as the moorhen was something like eight foot up the hedge, stretched out (long neck) and completely motionless... I assumed it was dead. Perhaps it had flown into this hawthorn hedge (by accident) and died. Perhaps a dog had killed it ealier in a walk and the dog's owner, somewhat embarrassed, had tossed the dead moorhen into the hedge, where it now effectively, hung.

I had my camera (my wee pocket panasonic), so I moved towards the motionless moorhen, stretched out inside a hedge, eight foot off the ground and raised the camera to take its photo.

And the moorhen suddenly flapped and flustered and popped out of the hedge a few feet away from me, ran down the path in front of me and disappeared. 

I got no photo

I've occasionally seen moorhens fly, sometimes quite high in the air - and I've often heard moorhens fly overhead at night. Those strange sounds you may sometimes hear, at night, made by birds clearly (but which birds?!) are very often made by rails or moorhens or coots or grebes - birds that one doesn't often see fly during the day - but I don't mind admitting - until this morning, I'd never seen a moorhen in a hedge, nowhere near water, pretending (as I'm sure it was) to be dead or a branch, so it wouldn't be noticed by me.

I've read since this morning, (here for example), that moorhens can and DO enlongate their bodies to get through dense vegetation and can and DO eat haws and roost/nest occasionally in hawthorn hedges.  But I still am confused by this particular moorhen this morning, high up this hawthorn hedge, doing its rubber chicken impression - as there genuinely is no water around that hedge - for at least half a mile. Not even a drainage ditch of any real merit.

Well... you live and learn don't you?

Next time... I'll be quicker on the camera.

Until then.

Keep 'em peeled.

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedge moorhen https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/now-thats-a-first Sat, 18 Jul 2020 14:14:17 GMT
The mimicker meets the mimicked (and thus its maker). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/the-mimicker-meets-the-mimicked-and-thus-its-maker Just a wee one today.

Two days ago whilst looking at the flowers on our "back lawn" (more like a meadow really full of white clover, birds foot trefoil and self-heal), I found a median (or french) wasp, Dolichovespula media, attacking and killing a hornet hoverfly (Volucell zonaria).

This king of hoverflies, Volucella zonaria, is superb at mimicking hornets or I suppose, median wasps, which are themselves, sometimes confused with hornets by inquisitive humans. They need to be good at mimicking the wasps and hornets though; as female hornet hoverflies must lay their eggs in wasps' (and hornets' and bees') nests and have their larvae develop inside these nests as commensals.

This adult, wasp-mimicking hoverfly was meeting the wasp it was mimicking though - not in a good way - and so ended up meeting its maker too.

 

Incidentally - 

The median wasp (Dolichovespula media) is easily recognised as such (as opposed to being a common wasp (Vespula vulgaris) or a German wasp (Vespula germanica)) because of its long (that's what "dolicho" means, dontchano?) body, two of its four (dorsal) thoracic spots are brown (the other two are yellow) and it has brown and yellow "inverted 7" marks on the sides of its thorax.

The median wasp is also known as the "French wasp". Again, as opposed to the German wasp.

French wasps nest in trees very often, in suspended paper nests, whereas German wasps nest underground. In *cough*, bunkers.

French wasps are also (I'm not joking!) easier to chase away and less aggressive than German wasps.

I' think I'll leave you with that thought.

TBR.

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) dolichovespula media french wasp hornet hoverfly median wasp volucella zonaria https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/the-mimicker-meets-the-mimicked-and-thus-its-maker Fri, 17 Jul 2020 09:45:00 GMT
Slow-ly does it. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/slow-ly-does-it I've seen quite a few grass snakes in the wild, without deliberately looking for them, that is to say by deliberately lifting up old bits of corrugated iron placed as reptile homes in nature reserves). I've seen them on golf courses and in London rivers and in Berkshire peat ponds. Grass snakes that is. 

But up until a day or two ago, I honestly don't think I'd ever seen a slow worm without deliberately setting out to search for one (using the same corrugated iron technique described in bold above).

I was walking around Bracknell Forest (the town and countryside) again yesterday, as I've done pretty-well each day for months now.

And happened across this wee thing - crossing a bridge over a SUDS pond in a (deserted) business park.

A young slow-worm.

And, like I say, a first for me, in that I've only ever seen slow-worms before seeing this one, after DELIBERATELY LOOKING FOR THEM.

A lovely, unexpected treat - and just to finish this post, I'll leave you with  a very short video of my encounter - here.

Keep 'em peeled, eh?

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) slow worm https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/slow-ly-does-it Wed, 15 Jul 2020 18:12:18 GMT
In the buff. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/in-the-buff At present, I am using a "turbo trainer" to get 1000 calories burned off quick as you like in the back garden. Easier than I make it sound, mind.

I've screwed my old racer bike to it and to be honest, even though it's quite hard work - it's also quite fun, in an "I like to birch myself" kind of way.

I bought it (the elite fluid turbo trainer) from ebay for a couple of dozen quid, as a cheap replacement to my all-singing-and-dancing static bike that broke under my immense mass* about two weeks ago.

* (Actually I've been on a real health kick since January 9th this year and have lost... wait for it..... well over FOUR STONE since that day in January where I read a blog post from an old pal and thought on that very day... you know what... I need to do that too!).

Anyway... I digress.

I was in the garden t'other day, under our largest poplar at the far end of the garden, well away from the house and on my turbo trainer, when I noticed a mouse-sized moth fluttering under one of our mock orange shrubs. I immediately recognised it as a poplar hawkmoth and thought I'd dismount from my bike and have a look at it. (You don't get this sort of distraction in gyms do you?!)

A closer inspection revealed this moth to yes, be a poplar hawkmoth, but a buff (or pink) form - so almost certainly a female - and freshly emerged from her subterranean pupa, where she had been for the previous nine or ten (more like it) months.

Most poplar hawkmoths are grey in colour, certainly the males anyway and most females, but quite a few females are much more colourful - buff or even pink in colour - and this was indeed the colour and form of our freshly-emerged female poplar hawkmoth.

 

She was floundering a wee bit though (poplar hawkmoths can't fly for the first day and night of their adult (winged form) lives), so I helped her onto a trunk of a tree where she could hide, sit still and pump out her pheromones  overnight. Ben, my eldest, was transfixed at the sight of such a large moth and proceeded to take photos with his new wee pocket camera.

She seemed to climb about ten feet and then settled down amongst the ivy. So I got back on the bike to finish my 25 miler (that's the length of my sessions these days) and Ben went back inside.

I didn't think much of her that evening or that night - but I did wander back up to the tree the following morning, to see if she was still OK (she wouldn't yet be capable of flying).

And look what I saw!

Ben was beside himself with excitement - as I suppose, in a mothy-way, was the male moth that she had enticed down to her, overnight.

Her pheromones had done the trick alright - and sucked in, like a tractor beam, a passing male, who fancied a bit of female moff, in the buff, quite literally.

There they stayed for a full 24 hours, locked together in a mothy carnal embrace.

And the following night, last night that is, as the flying ant swarms settled and were replaced in our garden at least, by two HUGE male stag beetles, these two moths, flew away.

I hope that the female is now laying dozens of eggs on the undersides of our millions of poplar leaves in the garden - I may not find them... but I bet I see a caterpillar or two or if not a caterpillar... an adult, maybe next year.

Keep 'em peeled, eh?

 

 

Footnote.

The scientific name for the Poplar hawkmoth is Laothoe populi.

Laothoe was one of the concubines of the famous King Priam (king of Troy during the Trojan war) and the name Laothoe literally meant (at the time):  "nimble people".

Poplar hawkmoths are interesting for a number of reasons, not least of all in that they lack a "frenulum" matron, (a series of bristles or hook-like structures on the wings of most moths, which keep hind and forewings locked together at rest and synchronise wing movement when flying). This means when the poplar hawkmoth is at rest, it can hold its hind wings much further forward than most moths can - which provides a unique look to a resting poplar hawkmoth - all four wings are spread like a bunch of four small leaves.

But you knew all that already, I know.

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) 2020 Berkshire buff form garden Laothoe populi mating poplar hawkmoth poplar hawk-moth summer UK https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/in-the-buff Mon, 13 Jul 2020 19:24:09 GMT
SWARM! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/swarm This has been my daily (pretty-well) view, during this pandemic - as I've pushed my younger son around Bracknell Forest whilst my elder son has walked alongside me.

Today, I managed to push the buggy through a swarm of honeybees. (Not by design I hasten to add!).

I THOUGHT I had my wee pocket camera on "video" mode and set about videoing this swarm of bees, only the fourth (or fifth?) aerial swarm I've ever chanced upon (away from their home in a tree or hive that is).

But as the swarm disappeared into the grounds of the 3M building (RG12 8HT)  in a Bracknell industrial estate, I realised my camera WASN'T set to video, but to Aperture priority (my mode of choice) photo mode instead.... so I quickly got off one shot (below) and that was that - the swarm disappeared.

Please note. My wee boy and I were in NO danger from this swarm of honeybees and (of course) neither of us was stung.

I also have reported this swarm on the beeSwarm website (as should you I suggest, if you see one).

Keep 'em peeled, eh?

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) honeybee swarm https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/swarm Tue, 07 Jul 2020 11:37:10 GMT
The three waves of swifts. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/the-three-waves-of-swifts First things first. In case you weren't aware, this week (if you're reading this between June 27th and July 5th, 2020) is Swift Awareness Week.

I know, I know.... you've tired of "left-handed awareness day" and "brown sauce month" and "movember" and smurf appreciation week", haven't you... but swifts... well they (of course) deserve an awareness week. In fact, if you agree with me, you'd say they need an awareness week.

Covid 19 has put the kaibosh on a lot of the planned, physical activities, but there is still a lot going on (see the end of this blog post for a few details).

 

Secondly - I thought I'd put a little more meat on the bones of the story this year of our visiting swifts - swifts that have now THREE TIMES (this week) entered and explored my attic space - which regular readers of this blog will know I got very excited about t'other day.

I also got excited about swifts entering my (swift) tunnel (matron) in 2018 too - but no joy at all (of any description) last year - so what IS going on?

The wee picture below will explain all in terms of the three waves of swifts each year, but please remember that these wave dates are based on a site at altitude, by Lake Geneva (several 100 miles south of us) - so you can add a week or two (at least) to these rough dates below.

 

 

Now. What of my visiting swifts?

 

2018.

These interested swifts (above) arrived on 8th June. Bearing in mind the above (and my dates alteration) and also the fact that this swift pictured (above) only has a wee pale patch under its gob - well... that would suggest (not guarantee, suggest) that this is a second wave swift. A two or three year old swift. These interested swifts did NOT pre-breed, but just were "bangers". (Flying up to the swift entrance and banging on it). Which would make them two years old, not three.

Why didn't they return last year to pre-breed and this year (when they're four years old) to breed?

You tell me.

 

 

2019.

No visitors of any sort really, other than a couple of swifts flying by at dusk, every so often, giving a wee scream to the swift call MP4 playing from our roof.

 

 

2020.

LOTS of interest in my attic space. (I took down the habi sabi swift boxes as to be blunt... they're awful - read my comment to this blog).

But how old are these visitors - and which wave do they belong to - will they finally breed in our attic next year?

OK... our first very interested swift  (below) arrived on June 15th.

 

Which... as per all the above, could make it wave 2 or perhaps wave 3. It has what I'd call a medium white throat... (young swifts have a very noticeably-white throat). But... it didn't pre-breed... it just "banged" for a bit. So.... if someone put a gun to my head... well... I'd guess (bit of a stab in the dark really - I didn't get great photos of these swifts) it is two years old again - rather like the swifts that arrived and entered my tunnel (matron) in 2018. So... if this swift (these swifts... there were a few) survive this year, get back down to the Congo again and return safely next year, they may then be three years old and "pre-breed". Enter the attic as a pair. Produce sterile eggs. Have a first go at it all, basically. Lots of big ifs there, mind - the biggest of all, of course, being that I'm calling these swifts two years old but I don't know that for sure. And if they do that, maybe they'll be back in 2022 to properly breed at four years old? If they survive that long, can avoid the Mediterranean guns and all that migrating - and of course we are still here at the new "Swift Half" to see them back?!

 

Finally then.

The most recent excitement came just a week ago now - and continued for a few days in good weather (nope... I don't know where all that hot sun went either).

These swifts arrived around the 25th June, maybe a few days earlier. Generally in a squadron of three-five - and this was the squadron that alighted in my swift tunnel and then EXPLORED inside the box (we have a camera in the box, piped wirelessly down to an old portable TV in the conservatory - and Ben, my eldest, noticed a swift in that box (a box built INSIDE the attic - for bird ringing purposes eventually), first.

I got a great photo of this bird, see below - in strong sunshine.

You can see this bird has a very white throat - and the lateness of its arrival would strongly suggest to me that this bird was born last year. If that is the case AND it survives another few years and trips to and fro' the Congo, it may not properly breed with us until 2023, i.e. when it becomes four years old. 

Blimey! 

Can I wait that long? 

Guess I may just have to!

 

I will have been desperately trying to get my favourite bird of all breeding with us here since 2012, after filming them in our attic at our old house in Reading in 2011.

Next Spring will be my tenth spring at our current house, the new "Swift Half", calling them down from the skies.

2023  (if I'm right about the bright swift above - and that is the year that it actually breeds with us, if it survives that long) will be my twelfth year at it.

TWELVE YEARS.

TWELVE.

YEARS.

Wildlife doesn't half teach you patience, eh?

 

***

 

 

 

 

Swift awareness week. Some details...

Edward Mayer was interviewed by David Lindo (The Urban Birder): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68a0nrJgWjo

Hampshire Swifts are encouraging records of nesting swifts, have a self-guided trail round Lymington and doing social media work.
Tideswell, Derbyshire: promoting swifts in the village and via the recently set up Environment Group there.

London (Mike Priaulx): The swift spotting hour was 8-9pm on 28 June, Search for #LondonSAW2020 on Twitter or Instagram or view LondonSAW2020 on Facebook for sightings.

For those in London, submit your sightings: https://islingtonswifts.wordpress.com/2020/06/21/swifts-spotting-hour-28-06-20-how-to-take-part/

Ely/Dick Newell: a sign installed drawing people's attention to the Swift boxes on various key buildings there. actionforswifts.com/2019/02/parapet-wall-swift-boxes-in-ely.html (Dick adds: “The Swifts can obviously read, because they are already going in and out of 6 out of the 12 boxes!”

Taverham (Norfolk) Swifts - leaflet drop.

Hull and East Yorkshire Swift Group working with Hull City Council & Yorkshire WT have installed 6 Swift boxes on the Guildhall in Hull.  Press release this week.Plus  leaflet drops and five boxes to be installed too.

N. Norfolk Villages (Thornham area) - leaflet drop in areas where swifts are thought to be nesting.

Truro: leaflet drop

The Guardian’s Country Diary Tuesday 30th was about swifts, written by Mark Cocker:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/jun/30/country-diary-are-all-our-swifts-out-for-the-count .

 A guest blog by Mike Priaulx will be on Mark Avery’s blog:
https://markavery.info/2020/06/30/guest-blog-swift-awareness-week-2020-by-mike-priaulx/

 Hackney Swifts (Henrietta Cole) - online quiz plus a swift spotting hour. (Open to all but you need to register for the quiz 8pm 2 July).

London (organised by Islington Swifts/Mike Priaulx). Unguided Swift spotting 8-9pm 28/7.

Bradford on Avon (Rowena Baxter) letter in The Wiltshire Times ( for 26/6)

Altringham (Tanya Hoare) webinar on swifts with a local natural history group. 30/6.

North Wales Wildlife Trust (Ben Stammers) swift feature on Radio Cymru’s natural history programme 27/6.

Macclesfield (Tina Hanak) a series of activities for the local Wildlife Explorer group members and see #MaccSwiftAdventure to follow the giant swift called Emily!

Adderbury & Deddington, Oxon, (Chris Mason) - local articles about swifts promoting self-guiding trails.

Landbeach (Dick Newell) - see http://actionforswifts.com/p/swift-viewing-in-landbeach-church-2020.html   Date Tbc.

Holland Park & Edward Mayer - online Zoom talk about how to help Swifts - Thursday 2nd July at 18-30 To book contact by e-mail = EcologyCentre@rbkc.gov.uk

Bolton & Bury (Louise Bentley) live event on Facebook re. swift boxes. Tcb.

Kingsteignton Devon (Alistair Whybrow) 28/6 a stall at the church with leaflets/nest boxes etc and an article in a local paper.

South Normanton (Helen Naylor) exciting range of activities for infants at her school.

Ludlow (Peta Sams) article in Ludlow paper

Shropshire Wildlife Trust (Sarah Gibson): press release and social media work. https://www.shropshirewildlifetrust.org.uk/news/love-your-swifts .

Derbyshire: blog on DWT website, local radio interview (26/7), social media activity, press release.

Aldeburgh Swifts video sent to those who have had Swift boxes fitted (over 150 boxes so far!)

Isle of Man: A reading of the book 'Screamer the Swift' is on YouTube https://youtu.be/6nokw5m0vgo and a worksheet (Screamer the Swift Q&A) plus 29 questions are linked to the story.

Huntly Swifts, Aberdeenshire (Cally Smith): a piece in the local paper, mention on BBC Radio Scotland Out of Doors this weekend plus Cally’s swift artwork at reduced prices (proceeds to her swift group) are on the Huntly swift group facebook page for purchase & via https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/colourworx ;
Plus a Swift window display in a village where we propose putting boxes in the church. Also a few swift videos and a ‘commentary’ on the Scottish WL Trust website.

Herts & Middx WL Trust held a webinar on swifts (65 attended) and will be tweeting about swifts/SAW next week.

Totley Group (Sheffield) Sally Goldsmith (and her 9 year old niece Bronwyn) will be interviewed by BBC Radio Sheffield on Tuesday about swifts.
Yorkshire Dales National Park: call for sightings of swifts. See https://www.yorkshiredales.org.uk/park-authority/living-and-working/wildlife-conservation/swift-conservation-project/

Bradwell Group, Derbyshire, further promotion of swifts in the village and linking with a new wildlife group there.

Hastings & Rother Group: article in Hastings & St Leonard’s Observer, launch of new Jonathan Pomroy logo.

Truro (Thais Martins): Action for Swifts leaflet drop around the town

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/7/the-three-waves-of-swifts Thu, 02 Jul 2020 15:25:47 GMT
REAL hope for next year now... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/real-hope-for-next-year-now Sure. 2018 was a good year here for the best birds of all, swifts. (Unfortunately, last year was bleedin' awful).

But this year is even better than even 2018.

By some way to be honest.

I have REAL hope now for next year after this season - we have up to five swifts buzzing the house constantly now, each day - and several alighting on the entrance to my swift space I've created in the attic (see photo below, taken yesterday at around 7pm).

Fingers crossed now for next season  - in the hope that one or more of these screamers and bangers will return next year to nest with us.

Oh... by the way... next year will be the 10th (TENTH!) year I've tried to get the best birds of all, back nesting with us, after moving here from Reading, all that time ago.

Fingers and toes and everything else crossed now...

 

EDIT AT 17:00. WE HAVE NOW ALL SEEN A SWIFT ENTER THE TUNNEL I'VE DRILLED THROUGH THE ATTIC WALL AND SHUFFLE ABOUT THE NEST SPACE INSIDE THE ATTIC THAT I'VE BUILT FOR SWIFTS. THIS SWIFT EVEN SHUFFLED ONTO THE NEST ROUND. WE THINK IT SPENT ABOUT 2 MINUTES IN THE SPACE.

WONDERFUL WONDERFUL NEWS AND A FIRST HERE. LET'S HOPE IT LIKED WHAT IT FOUND AND RETURNS SAFELY NEXT YEAR... TO NEST.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/real-hope-for-next-year-now Fri, 26 Jun 2020 12:29:10 GMT
We're up to SEVEN now! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/were-up-to-seven-now Since Ben found our first hornet moth t'other day - and more pertinently, our first hornet moth pupal exuvia a day later - we've been checking the base of the biggest poplar in the garden... and now found SEVEN exuviae!

They're everywhere!

Our hornet moths seem to prefer the exposed roots of our largest black poplar - and clearly are liking this sunny, hot weather.

We've even found two exuviae sticking out of the ground (see photos below) with adult moth long gone though, unfortunately.

Wonderful stuff.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hornet moth https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/were-up-to-seven-now Fri, 26 Jun 2020 12:17:23 GMT
Love 'em. Just LOVE 'EM. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/love-em-just-love-em The image below is a composite of around 35 images taken this afternoon.

We're having our best swift year ever here.

Omnipresent, always screaming and also, this year, like 2018, actually 'alighting' (never been happy with that word, mind) in my self-built swift space in the attic.

Love 'em. Just LOVE 'EM....

Swift Half Composite 2020Swift Half Composite 2020

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/love-em-just-love-em Wed, 24 Jun 2020 17:36:03 GMT
Ben gets better and better. A story about "adminicula"... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/ben-gets-better-and-better-a-story-about-adminicula Yesterday, my eldest boy found a newly-emerged hornet moth pumping up its wings at the base of our back garden's largest black poplar - a wonderful father's day present for me!

He's been bitten by the bug (hur hur) now - and is constantly looking out for more hornet moths.

No adult moth today... but again Ben has produced the goods, by today, almost unbelievably, finding the pupal exuvia of the adult moth he found yesterday.

He asked me to come to see something he'd found this afternoon - claiming it looked like a caterpillar but was probably a stick.

I immediately saw that it was a moth's pupal exuvia, lying on a leaf at the base of the large black poplar tree in our back garden - at a spot no more than 10cm from where I took a few photos of a newly-emerged hornet clearwing moth only yesterday.

This exuviae just HAD to be the one that the hornet moth emerged from. SURELY?

A close up photo would confirm.

So... below is the close up photo - and the eagle-eyed amongst you will notice the rings of backwards-facing chitinous spines, or "adminicula" to give them their proper zoological nomenclature, along the segments of the pupal case.

These "adminicula" are there for a good reason on hornet moths' pupae.

You see, they allow (assist or facilitate) the movement (or slow shuffling) of the pupa from its place of concealment (below the bark of a poplar tree), along the bored tunnel, into the great outside - where the adult can pupate. These adminicula act like rows of wee grappling hooks, to give the wriggling pupa purchase along the walls of the tunnel the caterpillar bored through the poplar tree.

REAL experts would be able to count the number of adminicula on the segments of this pupal exuvia and tell you (and me!) whether the adult that emerged from this particular pupa was a male or a female - as the number is specific and different for males and females. But I'm afraid to say, I'm not an expert on these things - and to be honest, even if I was, I wouldn't bother counting anyway.

Why wouldn't I count the adminicula to determine whether our moth was a male or a female?

Because I KNOW our moth was a female.

Bigger and more boldly-marked than the males, our female displayed these bold colours and thick black stripes and also displayed VERY female behaviour when we were taking photos of her - raising her abdomen into the air and emitting powerful pheromones with which to attract passing males (they only have a very short mating window, do these females).

 

I couldn't stick around yesterday to see whether a male took the bait so to speak but I expect one did - when I returned later in the day - there were no moths to be found nor any errr.... lipstick-tipped, post-coital cigarette butts, for example.

Anyyywaaaayyy...

This is 100% the pupal exuvia of our (female) adult hornet clearwing moth then.

And once again, my eldest boy has amazed me - and made me incredibly proud!

Aw shucks...

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) clearwing moth exuviae hornet clearwing moth hornet moth pupa pupal exuviae https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/ben-gets-better-and-better-a-story-about-adminicula Mon, 22 Jun 2020 19:37:52 GMT
Were you correct? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/were-you-correct Yesterday I posted that Ben, our eldest boy had found SOMETHING on the largest of our poplar trees in our back garden... but I had no time to blog further on the matter, so asked any reader of this blog to guess what he'd found.

But... did you guess correctly?

I've been searching (in vain) for these wee things for some time now. Turns out in order to see them, I barely needed to leave our kitchen!

I knew that they were almost certainly in the garden, after finding lots of evidence in the exposed roots of our big black poplars (see 2nd photo below) but up until yesterday, I'd only seen a red-belted clearwing moth on our (sadly, late) apple tree about 5 years ago - and not the cousin of the red-belted clearwing we've actually been looking for. (*That said the red-belted clearwing is far FAR rarer than the moth found yesterday - just far less impressive too).

Yesterday. Ben found a ...

 

Hornet (Clearwing) moth on an exposed root of our biggest black poplar in the garden.

That was my father's day present he proudly told me.

And to be honest.... I couldn't have wished for a better father's day present!

Oh sure, I know they're regarded as pests, these beautiful moths - and sure, I expect that one day, their larval activity in this tree will eventually, probably kill it.

But we have other black poplars (we're deliberately growing quite a few) and I still can't help thinking that this moth species is perhaps the best moth in the UK.

How on earth people consider butterflies to be more beautiful and more interesting than those awful grey or brown moths is completely beyond me.

Have a good week.

TBR.

 

(Photo 1 above and 2 below taken with my 15 year old Panasonic FZ50 bridge camera).

 

 

(Photos 3,4,5 and 6 below taken with my tiny wee pocket camera (the Panasonic TZ90))

 

(Photo 7 below taken with my pretty terrible 2018 Samsung J3 phone)

 

(Photos 8-15 below all taken with my 15 year old Panasonic FZ50 bridge camera).

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) clearwing moth hornet (clearwing) moth hornet moth https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/were-you-correct Mon, 22 Jun 2020 06:18:42 GMT
My eldest boy REALLY produces the goods this morning! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/my-eldest-boy-really-produces-the-goods-this-morning I've not got any time to post about this today, but after starting to teach my eldest boy how to REALLY use his eyes t'other day - well... he's knocked it out of the park this morning!

I got out of my "gym" at lunchtime, to find this note (below) from my wife, on the dining room table...

 

and a few photos on my WhatsApp account on my phone.

I've covered up a couple of words with a pink brush in photoshop...

So...

For now...

WHAT WAS IT THAT MY ELDEST BOY FOUND ON OUR BIGGEST POPLAR THIS MORNING (whilst I was "at gym")?

Have a guess.

The answer... with LOTS of photos... very soon.

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) mythtery https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/my-eldest-boy-really-produces-the-goods-this-morning Sun, 21 Jun 2020 13:06:10 GMT
Nine photos merged into one. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/nine-photos-merged-into-one

No words necessary...

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/nine-photos-merged-into-one Sat, 20 Jun 2020 15:15:57 GMT
Two peregrines and about two thousand toadlets. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/two-peregrines-and-about-two-thousand-toadlets At present, I'm trying to teach my eldest son what real awareness is outside;  and why perhaps it's best NOT to become a "birdwatcher". (I know... there'll be some "birdwatchers" reading this who I will shortly offend. Again).

By that I mean (I always have) birdwatchers (or as they often call themselves, "birders" *cringe cringe*)  tend to look upwards, very often skywards - and miss everything interesting at ankle level or below - worse still... stand on and crush the tiger beetle / bee orchid that they've not seen beneath their feet as they peer at a "lifer" in the sky high above their £3000 spotting scope.

Again, I've been labelled many things in my life, some of which I can't put in print here... but I've always recoiled at being thought of as a "birdwatcher". I'm just not. Never have been. I watch EVERYTHING outside - and that, more often than not, is crawling in nature, rather than flying.

I see and LOOK at things in the sky and on buildings and under logs and in ponds and in the grass and on leaves, close up and at distance. Very different to a (n often-blinkered) birdwatcher.

So yes.... my eldest is taking "awareness lessons" from me right now (God help the poor sod). Where he needs to look. What he needs to listen to. Where he needs to ALSO look. How to really USE his eyes. And his ears.

Will he notice that dead rose chafer wing case in the long grass over to his right?

Will he hear the nuthatch calling in the oak tree behind him?

Will he spot the ripples on the surface of the levelling pond to his left, ripples thrown up not by a carp - but by a grass snake.

Will he smell that nearby badger latrine?

Will he see those swifts, 500 foot above his head?

Will he notice those dark clouds on the horizon, scudding this way?

 

He's fortunate in some ways that his father is hyper aware. And.... unfortunate in others.

 

Today's lesson was to watch out for things right under your feet (hundreds and hundreds of toadlets) and also (at the same time!) things in the far, far distance.

Ben took the photos below of the toadlets (I'm teaching him how to use my wee pocket camera too) and I took the photo of the two peregrines.

Same town.

Same hour.

Same day.

Our "patch".

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) peregrine toadlet https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/two-peregrines-and-about-two-thousand-toadlets Tue, 16 Jun 2020 13:52:58 GMT
"It's not the despair, Laura... I can take the despair. It's the hope I can't stand." https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/-its-not-the-despair-laura-i-can-take-the-despair-it-s-the-hope-i-can-t-stand Two years ago (almost to the day) I blogged about the best birds of all (of course) finally returning to a NEW "Swift Half"after seven years of trying to attract them into the attic.

Then last year, in a true annus horribilis for swifts, I had to report that we basically had a nil year here.

But today.… HOOOOOOBOYY today - they're BACK! (Photo below taken just before 7am this morning).

For only the second time ever (here) and not since the heatwave summer of 2018, the best birds of all have been lured back into our attic. 

I assume the squadron of three screaming swifts that have been lapping our house in wide loops for a week or three now are young, non-breeding prospectors - and if that is the case... then once again - I can only dream about one or two of them returning next year to FINALLY breed.

I (I trust) will be ready - and so will my cameras!

Cross your fingers and toes please!

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/-its-not-the-despair-laura-i-can-take-the-despair-it-s-the-hope-i-can-t-stand Mon, 15 Jun 2020 15:17:31 GMT
Toadlet. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/toadlet It was mid February that I posted about this year's annual toad migration - when the 2000 (or so) local adult toads leave their woodland home and cross the one road they need to, in order to get to their traditional breeding pond a mile away from their wood.

Yes. A lot has happened since mid February eh - including several weeks of very warm, very VERY dry weather - so you might have forgotten that last winter was warm and wet (and windy) and as such, the nation's toads migrated back to their breeding ponds en masse, a little earlier (mid February) than is commonplace (early March).

Normally, one might expect to see all the tiny wee toadlets leave the pond in which they were born, in early July - but this year, we can start looking now.

I took a solo, 7 mile walk at 06:30am this morning (for 6 days a week I try to do this sometime in the day - although normally it's with my boys and later in the day) and lo and behold, look what crawled in front of me on the local toad road.

At first I thought it was a wolf spider - not a tiny wee toadlet. (No... it's a common misconception that wolf spiders are the massive spiders that race under your sofa when you turn the sitting room light on in the morning - those are just house spiders - proper wolf spiders on the other hand are actually tiny, penny or halfpenny-sized spiders that seem to sunbathe outside on logs and scurry for cover when you get close).

Anyway, on closer inspection, I ascertained it was of course a tiny wee toadlet and not a wolf spider, and rather like its parents (very possibly), four months ago almost to the day, I scooped it up on my pocket camera case and helped it cross the road in the direction of its adult home - the patch of wood about a mile from the pond it had just left a day or so ago.

Please do look out for your local toadlets. They'll be on the move right now, I'm sure.

They, even more so than their parents (hundreds of times bigger than their progeny at present), have a "herculean (to use the phrase du jour) task" to get to their woodland homes from their birth ponds - so if you can help them across any roads - well... all power to you, I say.

They won't thank you. In fact they'll look particularly angry and grumpy that you've seen fit to assist them. But that's toads all over. Angry-faced. They can't help it. And anyway.... their beautiful gold leaf eyes more than make up for any miserable mouth they have.

 

 

 

Photo below is of one of the adult toads I helped cross the road towards their breeding pond in mid February this year. This toad (I helped nineteen) could perhaps be the ACTUAL PARENT of the tiny wee toadlet I helped cross the same road (but in the opposite direction - i.e. towards its adult woodland home) this morning.

I guess I'll never know.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) toadlet https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/toadlet Sun, 14 Jun 2020 14:37:25 GMT
The ox-eye family. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/the-ox-eye-family No words.

Just photos.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) ox-eye daisy https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/the-ox-eye-family Thu, 11 Jun 2020 07:29:56 GMT
"Beautiful priestess of the Argive plain". https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/-beautiful-priestess-of-the-argive-plain

Mid June.

The best time to see peacock butterfly caterpillars in clumps on nettles - which we did today on our walk around the local countryside. (Short video below shot on my phone this morning and all photos taken by me (of course!) over the past few years).

 

The peacock butterfly's scientific name of Aglais io literally means "beautiful" (from Gr. 'agloas') and "io" (or priestess daughter of Inachus, river god of Argos).

Turned into a heifer by Zeus, to protect her from Hera's jealousy, after he fell in love with her, she (Io) was watched over by the hundred-eyed, all-seeing Argus Panoptes, until Hermes (sent by Zeus) killed the many-eyed monster.

After Argus was killed, Hera put his hundred eyes into the tail of the peacock (bird) and sent a horsefly (which, incidentally, I also saw my first of this year, today) to torment Io, who wandered all over the known world until settling in modern-day Egypt.

Linnaeus had adopted Petiver's name Oculus pavonis* (eye of the peacock (bird)) for the peacock (butterfly) for obvious reasons (see all my photos of the imago butterfly on this post) and the link between Io, Argus and the peacock may have influenced him.

Anyway - do keep your eyed peeled whilst walking past patches of nettles right now...

* Pavon (Paon now) from Levaillant's "Pavaneur". See plate 388 here.

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Aglais io peacock https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/-beautiful-priestess-of-the-argive-plain Tue, 09 Jun 2020 13:35:38 GMT
"Puttock augmentation" (part three). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/-puttock-augmentation-part-three Whilst we are stuck in Royal Berkshire at present, it seems only fit to again report on the Royal County's Royal Kites.

On our walk the other afternoon, the three boys (me and my sons) of the house, watched a sileage field be cut and twenty kites (and two buzzards) also therefore make hay whilst the sun shone.

A few photos and a video below.

On August 1st it will be thirty-one years EXACTLY that these birds were reintroduced (5 individuals from Spanish stock) to the Chiltern escarpment a dozen or two miles away from us - and I think we're up to c.5000 pairs now.

 

KitesKites

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) buzzard red kite https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/-puttock-augmentation-part-three Wed, 03 Jun 2020 15:13:27 GMT
Corvid-19? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/corvid-19 Just having a quick coffee in the garden  (before the first rain in weeks I hear?) - and a magpie just dropped dead from the sky and fell into our small "hedge honeysuckle" bush by the shed.

Stone cold deid.

Eyes wide open.

Beak agape.

No. I don't know either.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) magpie https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/corvid-19 Wed, 03 Jun 2020 08:34:08 GMT
An environmentally-ignorant council. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/an-environmentally-ignorant-council This morning, the council (that's Bracknell Forest Council by the way) mowed and strimmed their way around the business park (or industrial estate - call it what you will) and completely destroyed the bee orchids that we discovered only a couple of days ago.

I found one of the knuckle draggers - complete with strimmer in hand.

To his credit, he at least apologised - but I'm pretty sure he wouldn't recognise a bee orchid if I rammed one up his jacksie.

Such a dreadful shame.

 

NB.

EDIT @ 19:30hrs. 

Walked my two boys around the town this afternoon and we found ONE surviving (new) bee orchid which had been missed by both strimmer and mower a hundred yards or so from the destroyed orchids. (Photo below).

A spot of luck and better than nothing I guess.

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bee orchid bracknell forest council https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/6/an-environmentally-ignorant-council Mon, 01 Jun 2020 13:33:59 GMT
More orchids... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/more-orchids My eldest joined me on my 5 mile walk around Bracknell today - and after taking some close-up photos of the bee orchids that I blogged about yesterday, (you'll absolutely get why they're called "bee orchids" when you look at my photos below) ...

 

we also found some very unexpected pyramidal orchids, in the same industrial estate.

 

Lovely to see and as I've already mentioned - more than a bit of a surprise!

Have a sunny Sunday...

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bee orchid orchid pyramidal orchid https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/more-orchids Sun, 31 May 2020 09:41:17 GMT
3M and the Romans' eyebrows. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/3m-and-the-romans-eyebrows What do you think of, when you think of 3M?

The 3M Corporation that is. You know... the "Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing" company?

 

Do you think of post-it notes?

 

Or (pretty-well ALL) road signs?

 

Nah.... you'll think of Scotch tape, eh?

 

Oh.. hang on.  Of course!

Face masks!

Amirite?

 

Currently, we have the utter, unbridled "joy" of living in the tiny, sleepy hamlet of Bracknell and therefore very close to the UK base of 3M.

As a Bracknell resident for almost a decade now, I used to think of peregrines when I thought of 3M, as two birds (both falcon (female) and tiercel (male)) used to roost each night on a high ledge on the old 3M building in the centre of town - I used to watch them there regularly.

Now that the old 3M building has been pulled down and replaced by a block of flats (which to my eye doesn't look much different, skyline-wise) these birds of prey have taken to roosting on the nearby Fujitsu building on the outskirts of the town. 

3M still have their large UK HQ in Bracknell though, situated on a huge plot of land in the western industrial estate. This is where I'm teaching my eldest to ride his bike on roads and also forms part of my government-sanctioned 5 or 6 or 7 mile walk around the area. I walk as often as I can - you'll see me pushing our 1yo around in his buggy with my 7yo by my side very often, striding around the picturesque industrial estates of Bracknell!

 

Anyway... until yesterday... I used to think of peregrines when I thought of 3M.

Yesterday on my walk past the 3M "estate", I noticed something interesting.

Now when I think of 3M, I don't think of peregrines. Nor post-it notes. Nor road signs. Not even face masks. 

No.

Now when I think of 3M.... I think of bee orchids.

 

The bee orchid or Ophrys apifera is a wonderful wee plant that, in common with all its Ophrys cousins, mimics insects or spiders (a bee in this case, obviously) to attract pollinators.

Incidentally, the name of Ophrys literally means "eyebrow" - Pliny the Elder so-called these plants "eyebrow" plants as Roman women would use these plants to darken their eyebrows.

Have a lovely weekend.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bee orchid https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/3m-and-the-romans-eyebrows Sat, 30 May 2020 09:19:37 GMT
Why? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/why OK. OK. I'll put you out of your misery.

The short, 30s video below, shot with my smartphone two days ago, will reveal to you the mystery animal that crossed the road in front of me, on my walk on Tuesday.

 

Did you guess correctly, then?

You'll also, I hope, understand after watching this video, why I titled this blog post "Why?"

I also called this photo below  "Why..." - a photo that I hoped would make me a million pounds. But sadly that didn't happen in this day and age of photoshop!

(For the record, the photo below, which is printed onto a large canvas, hung on our hall wall at home and always gets a nice comment or two from visitors (corrr... remember them? Visitors?!) is not a photoshopped photo. The hen was my champion egg-layer a few years ago. "Couven" was her name. And the photo was shot just after dawn, on a summer's morning about ten years ago, on Swainstone Road, Reading - about a mile from where my wife and I used to live at the time...

Why?Why?

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) chicken road why https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/why Thu, 28 May 2020 11:00:00 GMT
What? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/what A quick question for you this morning - and I'll reveal the answer at noon tomorrow (with a blog post containing a 30s video, that I've already written and scheduled to be automatically-published tomorrow).

 

So...

On a walk yesterday, something crossed the road directly in front of me.

Something very unexpected.

But what was it?

As described in bold above, I managed to get a short (smartphone-shot) video of the fantastic beast that crossed the road in front of me ... and a screenshot from the start of that video can be seen below (not that this will help you!)

 

Have a think.

Have a guess.

See if you're right, tomorrow, from noon.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) mystery https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/what Wed, 27 May 2020 09:15:37 GMT
Beetlemania. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/beetlemania Little did my eldest son know, on waking up this morning, that he'd be manhandling two of our biggest UK beetles in the day ahead.

First up... a handful of cockchafers (or May bugs, or Doodlebugs or Billy Witches) in our moth trap.

The more zoologically-minded amongst you will note that there are seven "fingers" to each of the May bug's antennae on Ben's hand - so that makes it a male May bug then of course, because as you'll know - female Billy Witches have six fingers to each antenna.

You'll also note that we found a couple of Doodlebugs canoodling, so to speak.

A "special kiss", as Ben calls it. Hmmm....

 

Then, later today, I spied another male (big "antlers") stag beetle marching purposefully across our garden. We, as I'm sure you're also aware by now, have a couple of colonies of stag beetles in our gardens (one in our front garden and one in our back) so we are almost used to seeing gurt big stag beetles helicoptering around us every May.

Here are a couple of videos I've taken of some of our stag beetles over the last few years. I know. We're very lucky. 

 

 

There we go then. 

Beatlemania. Beetlemania here today, on the scorchio Costa Del Berkshire.

Keep well.

More soon.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Billy Witch Cockchafer Doodlebug May bug stag beetle thunder beetle https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/beetlemania Wed, 20 May 2020 18:29:00 GMT
Progeny. Probably. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/progeny-probably Regular visitors to this, the most scintillating of all websites, may know that I am not particularly fond of foxes - for a well-documented reasons.

That said, at present we don't keep hens ( I do miss keeping hens!) so for now, as long as I can keep "my" stag beetles as safe as I can, I will tolerate the presence of these vulpine varmints.

This morning my eldest boy witnessed the local dog fox ooch about by one of the holes it has dug under our "western border" at 06:20am (yes, like his father, he rises at sparrowfart too) and the dog was followed by one of his cubs (probably) ten minutes later.

Both clips can be seen on the short video below.

I have no idea how the next few months let alone the next few years will pan out (if it was solely up to me I'd be on a plane to New Zealand ASAP after this pandemic), so currently I(we) have no immediate plans to restock our chicken run with birds - and therefore, for now, I will continue to tolerate our foxes. For now.

(With all that in mind... even I think the cub looks pretty sweet in the clip below!).

Stay safe.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/progeny-probably Sun, 17 May 2020 15:27:31 GMT
Everything's gone a bit "purple sandpiper" this Spring? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/everythings-gone-a-bit-purple-sandpiper-this-spring I'd like to briefly take you back to August 1985.

Madonna was at number one in the UK charts with "Into the groove" and whilst taking a "Young Ornithologists Club" (YOC - does that even exist any more?!) holiday at the Aigas Field Centre, Beauly, Highland, I was driven, with about twelve other young teenagers to Nairn, overlooking the Moray Firth, to go look for Bottlenose dolphins.

Dolphins we saw, as well as a pomarine skua if I remember correctly - but it was the young purple sandpiper that flew in off the sea and landed on my boots (I was wearing them at the time) that I remember most from that day.

Purple sandpipers breed in the far north - on Arctic islands, the tundra and some remote Scandinavian coasts. The young basically don't even see humans, before they spread their wings and fly south for the autumn or winter - and as such, rather like other wading birds such as turnstones, seem to be particularly "friendly" or "tame" during their formative encounters with humans.

The purple sandpiper that flew in off the Moray Firth in August 1985 and alighted onto one of my boots on the pebbly shore of Nairn, had probably been born on the shores of Svalbard (or somewhere similar) three months earlier - and I could well have been the first human it had ever seen. Perhaps. 

 

Over the past few weeks of lockdown, it has struck me that many of our birds (and mammals) have become a little more obvious. A little more approachable. A little "friendlier". A little more "tame". A little more "purple sandpiper".

I saw that Steve Backshall (president of my local wildlife trust these days) who lives locally on the Thames, has noticed a superb breeding year for the river's birds. No wash-creating boats to flood nests and no walkers to disturb young you see.

I've certainly also noticed a LOT more wildlife than I would have expected perhaps to have seen in more "normal times".  Now I walk like a countryman (I've been told) and tread very softly - far more softly than you might expect I can, being a 250lb gorilla - AND I'm hyper-aware, so yeah... I tend to notice more things than most  - but this Spring, so far, with many humans and their vehicles on lockdown - I'm noticing crazy amounts of stuff - a lot of it at far closer quarters than I'd have normally seen it.

I try to take a walk each day still (quite hard with my two boys needing me constantly) - and when I do, I'm bowled over by all the birds (especially) I'm seeing - at very close quarters.

Of course, this is the time of year when all birds are frantically breeding  - and you'll (we'll) see all kinds of young birds close up right now. I had to pull a fledgling house sparrow out of our kitchen sink drain a few days ago (it had flown into our kitchen window and stunned itself - then got trapped) and there do seem to be a lot of fledgling birds 'oochering' about right now  - but this year they all seem to be acting like young, first season, purple sandpipers - they just don't seem to be at all bothered by us humans at present - or far less than years gone by, I'd say.

Well... that's a nice plus for me I guess. In all this gloom. And with that thought in mind, I'll leave you for today with a photo I took on my dawn walk this morning. Of a fledgling robin that again, seemed completely unfazed by me and my (pocket) camera.

Stay well.

TBR.

Fledgling robin in hawthornFledgling robin in hawthorn

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) robin https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/everythings-gone-a-bit-purple-sandpiper-this-spring Fri, 15 May 2020 09:46:53 GMT
Fight night(s). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/fight-night-s Maybe like me, you've just watched our wretched Prime Minister deliver his pre-recorded garbage to the nation and are now, also like me, itching for a fight?

In which case, I can give you what you need.

Perhaps.

You see... I've been recording the antics of our garden hedgehogs over the past few nights and I think I can conclude that...

a) We certainly have two hedgehogs. Both male. And I think we have three. ALL three male.

b) One of our (bigger) male hedgehogs doesn't seem keen to share its food (we feed them hedgehog food behind one of our water butts) with anyone else.

c) Two (or perhaps three... but I think two) are noisily fighting each night.

 

This snorting behaviour (see my video below) is common amongst hedgehogs - both in terms of hedgehogs meeting other rival hedgehogs and expressing a physical reaction to let the other hedgehog know it needs to back off (in my video below) and also when a male "courts" a female - although in that case, the male doesn't tend to barge the female across the ground (as in my video clip below where an act of aggression can be seen, rather than anything amorous (even brutally amorous!)).

So... do have a little peep at my short video below. And if you hear these noises in your garden hedges or borders any time soon - you now know what creature is making them.

 

Oh... and before I go. Talking of creatures. If YOU were one of the creatures that voted for Brexit Boris and his band of Tory brothers (and sisters) in December's election please know this BEFORE you step out of your porch and again clap your gnarled, hypocritical hands next Thursday.

Matt Hancock (yes... the current health secretary) and Demonic Raab (yes, incredibly the foreign secretary) and Priti Vacant Patel (yes, unbelievably, the home secretary) AND the buffoon in chief (yes, ridiculously the Prime Minister) ALL voted AGAINST NHS workers getting a fair (most would say) pay rise in Parliament in 2017 - and then cheered and laughed when the results of that vote were announced in parliament - the result meaning NHS workers got no fair pay rise.

Yup. If you voted for this shower - can I suggest that instead of clapping your hands and banging your pots and pans on Thursday night, you do the right thing instead - just pop your head out of the window, hang it in REAL SHAME - and say "sorry" - then solemnly promise not to vote Tory ever (EVER) again.

(Uh huh. I'm still itching for a fight).

Good night.

TBR.

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/fight-night-s Sun, 10 May 2020 20:01:01 GMT
Eight eyes make me worry less about my two. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/eight-eyes-make-me-worry-less-about-my-two-eyes Since turning forty-five, I've had to wear reading glasses as well... basically... I just can't read any small text on books or on product labels any more. It's a bit of a drag to be honest, especially for someone who has banged on and on about "using your eyes" on this website in particular.

That said, my two ageing eyes can't be in too bad shape still - I noticed a tiny wee jumping spider on our porch this afternoon in the sun. Can't have been more than 5mm long the wee thing - but notice it I did... INCLUDING the colour of its even-tinier pedipalps -and they (its pedipalps) can't have been more than 1mm long.

Yup - still got it! (Eyes-wise).

Anyway - the lovely wee jumping spider this afternoon that I spied (and then showed Ben, our eldest) was a "Sun jumper", a Heliophanus ("sun-loving") jumping spider.

If someone put a gun to my head and said name the actual species, I'd plump for Heliophanus flavipes ("yellow footed") rather than Heliophanus cupreus ("coppery") but it was certainly one of those species and a female to boot.

Anyway - a lovely, yellow-pedipalped sun jumper - and a quick, impromptu lesson into tiny jumpers for my eldest boy - who was made to stand guard and watch the spider whilst his Daddy fetched his old camera! (My actual photo below).

Hope you're all OK in this lockdown.

I'm better now that today I spotted my first swallows and swifts of the year from the back garden...

More soon perhaps.

TBR.

"Yellow-footed" jumping spider"Yellow-footed" jumping spider

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) first swift of the year Heliophanus cupreus Heliophanus flavipes jumping spider porch south facing spider sun lover tiny yellow footed https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/5/eight-eyes-make-me-worry-less-about-my-two-eyes Mon, 04 May 2020 18:04:20 GMT
If you can... *do* try... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/if-you-can-do-try Cruddy, innit.

This "lockdown" I mean.

Oh sure, I understand that there are many (thousands? Millions?) who are fine with it. For these people, the "lockdown" has given them time to start baking their own bread, or learn a language, or get some jobs done around the house, or to take up a new hobby such as painting.

But those are the INCREDIBLY fortunate ones. Often with garden. Probably without small children to watch over 24/7. And with a little money behind them (mortgage paid off?), and indeed a little money in front of them perhaps, too.

For many millions of others though, life is FAR harder than that right now, FAR less comfortable and far, FAR less certain.

It struck me the other day as I was watching another 3 hours of awful 24hr news from around the UK and around the globe that unless I was very careful, I'd not, this year, take the time to notice the stuff around me. I'd be too busy looking after my 1yo all day long, suddenly. Or home schooling my 7yo. Or watching the news all the time. I'd not take the time to notice the bluebells. I'd not take the time to notice the tawny mining bees excavate their wee volcanoes at the back of the garden. I'd not take the time to notice the swallows arriving. And the bee-flies probing the forget-me-nots in the garden. Nor the appearance of the oak leaves.

I'd hate to get to the end of the summer, having drowned in 24hr news coverage and not even tried to take the time to notice all the wonderful stuff around me, in the garden if nowhere else, which I so enjoy each spring and summer.

 

With that in mind, I altered my daily walk (and cycle ride today) to take in three of my local bluebell woods, this week.

I normally take the entire family to a bluebell wood at the end of April, each year, as you'll perhaps remember. I call it the annual pilgrimage.

But this year, as these woods are each about three miles away from the house, in varying directions - and our seven year old would struggle to walk (or cycle) that far let alone our one year old (who can't cycle yet and can only just about toddle), then this year the annual pilgrimage is a solo odyssey, unfortunately.

They're not too bad this year either, the bluebells. The photos I took below (in three different local woods) were taken for my family's benefit as well as mine.

And of course, if you don't have my good fortune of living near several bluebell woods during this lockdown, then these are for you too.

Stay safe, grapple fans.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bluebells https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/if-you-can-do-try Sun, 19 Apr 2020 15:43:22 GMT
Shouting at shrews.... (and spiders). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/shouting-at-shrews-and-spiders I'm writing this post after finding this (below) on my government-sanctioned daily walk today.

 

Now.

Many, many moons ago, I used to be a paperboy (do paperboys even exist any more?) and as such I was often cycling around the roads of High Wycombe around dawn, delivering newspapers. From about 1982-1986, if you really want to know.

And... being hyper-aware, I was often noticing and cycling around dead shrews on pavements.

Not so much rodents like mice. Or rats. 

Shrews.

Always shrews.

(Shrews aren't rodents by the way - in case you didn't know).

And not bloody corpses. Just nice whole, plump shrews.

 

I was led to believe back then that it was always shrews (rather than mice or rats for example)  that you'd see lying dead on pavements as shrews liked their environment to be very, very quiet indeed... and if they just had to cross a road to get from one hedge to another, or from one patch of woodland to another - and a loud motor vehicle roared down that road as they *ahem* waited to cross the road on the pavement, they'd simply drop dead of a heart attack. The noise would be too much for them. It would SHOCK them to death.

Explained why these dead (pavement) shrews seemed otherwise uninjured, you see. No missing limbs or head. No chewed body. No blood or entrails visible. Just a perfect-looking shrew, on its back, with its feet in the air. A heart attack then. OBVIOUSLY.

 

Fast forward a few years to the late 1980s and I was to be found carrying out my own shrew survey in a wood near Hughenden, High Wycombe.

OK then. Millfield wood, if you really want to know.

My shrew survey consisted of me taking my mother's nail scissors (nope - she didn't ever find out) up to the wood where I would use them to trim the fur of shrews I'd caught in the leaf litter of the wood. I'd trim the fur in different spots for each shrew I caught and therefore know if I caught them again, not to count them again in my population data.

I got quite good at catching shrews during that.... what...? Month. In the summer of 1987. Although to be honest, it isn't that hard, if you have hearing like me. Shrews are noisy little buggers at the best of times. And as long as you didn't SHOUT at them (see above) then it was a relatively straightforward operation.

Find a suitable patch of leaf litter. Stay still. Wait for a shrew to come wandering along under the litter - you'd see the litter move and hear their constant chittering. Then jump on them like a big bald fox, making a circle (with you arms) around the leaf litter spot you last saw move. Then start digging.

I must have caught... ooooh….  thirty... shrews in that month. And given them all little haircuts. The poor sods.

The hard part was explaining to the dog walkers who'd wander by on the paths, just what on earth I was doing - leaping into piles of leaf litter with a pair of nail scissors held between my teeth - in a wood in the middle of nowhere - as a SIXTEEN YEAR OLD!

Although to be honest, I probably had something of a local reputation by then. I spent almost all my free time in the countryside behind our house. I basically lived up there all summer. In a pair of shorts and boots and a bottle or two of water (with a packet of cigarettes too, in my twenties). I clearly remember crouching shirtless, smoking on a country path in the summer once (probably around 1992), deeply tanned after spending the previous three months up there, breaking the neck of a big carrion crow that I'd found with shotgun damage to both of its wings. Which would have been fine - if I'd done it BEFORE the very middle class family (mummy and daddy and two be-alice-banded girls, came round the corner with their pic-a-nic basket and saw me. This hulk of a man, half naked, crouched over a crow, snapping its neck and then letting it go to flap around for a bit as all the nervous impulses went berserk for a while, post-mortem. I don't think I've ever seen anyone's eyes open as wide as that family's - they LITERALLY ran away from me before I could explain!

Anyway.... where was I?

Oh yeah.

Shrews.

Yes... I've had a little experience with shrews. Although I've now, somewhat reluctantly come to the conclusion that it probably isn't traffic noise that makes these pavement shrews keel over in shock and have a fatal heart attack.

It's unfortunately more to do with the fact that shrews, a bit like their moley cousins, taste bleeding awful. They're killed by a fox or a cat and dropped shortly afterwards, as their foul taste starts to become apparent to the animal that's killed them. It just so happens that you find them on pavements -as that's where YOU tend to walk, isn't it? They are actually dropped all over the gaff - the world is literally FILLED with dead shrews, dropped in disgust by the foxes and cats that thought that long-nosed mouse would fill the gap nicely between meals, only to discover that it tasted so BAD! But you won't come across those shrews dropped off woodland paths or in long grass. You wouldn't ever see them, would you? But you certainly WOULD see the dead animals on roadsides and pavements. And you might well notice that the little dead mammals on pavements are almost always shrews. Not mice. Shrews.

So, boring though it is... shrews can be found on pavements NOT because the sound of a motor car makes their wee hearts stop but instead... because that's the place you're most likely to walk by and see them, having been dropped by a fox or a cat that suddenly thought that thing in their mouth is starting to taste a bit rank.

 

Now.

That all said.

The next time you see or hear a live shrew, "oochering" around in the leaf litter in front of you (you may need me there to point this out to you?) suddenly stop and shout at it if you like.

Shout anything you want at it.

Shout anything.

LOUDLY.

VERY LOUDLY.

And abruptly.

Shout something like "BANG!"

Or "HEYYYYY!".

It'll be fine. 

I promise.

Its wee heart can take it.

Honest.

 

 

Finally - a tip for the arachnophobes amongst you.

Shouting at shrews will have very little effect. Probably.

But shouting at spiders will have a very handy effect.

Spied an incy-wincy (or less incy-wincy to be honest, and more GURT BIG RACING) spider on the wall of your bedroom, or perhaps on the carpet - and want to get rid of it oot the window, but every time you get near it, it races under the sofa or behind the wardrobe?

Then SHOUT AT IT.

SHOUT something LOUD and ABRUPT.

Shout something like:

"HALT!"

(You can even add a German accent if you like and  "VER ARE YOUR PAPERS?!" As long as it's loud and staccato).

Spiders instantly freeze when shouted at.

(I don't mean their haemocoel (that's spiders' blood by the way - you're learning more and more on this website aren't you?)  immediately solidifies into ice.... no I mean they instinctively freeze... they stop stock still).

It's all to do with their wee hairy legs you see - very sensitive to vibrations they are - for obvious (insecty) reasons. 

So.

Want to drop a glass over a spider so you can hoy it out of a window?

Shout "HALT!" at it - as you go to get the glass over it.

Like taking candy from a baby.

Try it.

You'll see....

 

TBR.

Female fencepost-jumping spiderFemale fencepost-jumping spider

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) shrew spider https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/shouting-at-shrews-and-spiders Thu, 16 Apr 2020 09:44:53 GMT
A Greek tragedy. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/2020-doesnt-get-any-better-does-it-awful-news-from-greece 2020 doesn't get any better does it? Awful news from Greece yesterday.

And yes, I know this may seem completely trivial at present, what with CoVid-19 literally killing dozens of thousands of humans around the world.

But this *is* a wildlife blog.

And you will remember … I *do* adore "my" swifts.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) house martin swallow swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/2020-doesnt-get-any-better-does-it-awful-news-from-greece Sat, 11 Apr 2020 10:38:01 GMT
Watering hole. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/watering-hole Oh to be a fox right now.

Or even a hedgehog.

Or better still.... some kind of bird (we have a pair of house sparrows nesting in our camera box this year).

More soon...

Stay safe.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/watering-hole Sat, 11 Apr 2020 10:25:07 GMT
Reclamation... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/reclamation The geese are reclaiming the deserted local business park...

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) canada goose https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/reclamation Tue, 07 Apr 2020 09:12:42 GMT
When this old world starts a getting me down... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/when-this-old-world-starts-a-getting-me-down …and people are just too much. For me to fa-ace...

I've seen and heard a fox on the garage roofs behind our back garden a few times last month, so thought I'd pop a trail camera up there last night.

The spliced-together video above is what the trail camera picked up. 

For now I assume the lame fox (the first fox in the video) is probably a dog and all the other clips are of the (only) vixen. 

Up on the (garage) roof.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/4/when-this-old-world-starts-a-getting-me-down Thu, 02 Apr 2020 15:03:14 GMT
Hedgehogs in our side passage. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/hedgehogs-in-our-side-passage Just a quick post tonight with a spliced-together video of the hedgehogs in our side passage last night.

Stay safe.

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/hedgehogs-in-our-side-passage Tue, 31 Mar 2020 18:11:03 GMT
A message to joggers. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/a-message-to-joggers I'm going to try and be as polite as I can with this wee post, but if I stray into screaming obscenities, then please forgive me.

 

For the love of God, will you effing joggers out there begin to appreciate that this current time is NOT the best time to continue to puff and pant and sweat and spit your way down your traditional jogging routes, that is to say narrow kerreisting pavements.

I understand (HOO BOY do I understand) that you need to take your daily exercise. Whilst we are allowed (for how long I wonder) I try to get a walk in each day too. But what I will never understand is that YOU feel it's OK to run towards people down a narrow pavement - and worse, get salty when those people you run towards stop and scream "WTAF!" at you.

Some advice -as you clearly need it, you effing selfish, arrogant imbeciles.

1 - Just don't jog.  I dunno... buy a bleeding skipping rope or something.

2 - If you absolutely HAVE to jog, choose an open area or a WIDE path or pavement.

3 - If you can't even do that, then YOU MUST prepare to get HYPER AWARE and then zig-zag across roads YOURSELF, to avoid people who SHOULD NOT be expected to get out of your way.

4 - If you can't do that then return to point 1.

 

It is ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS the faster person's (or vehicle's) responsibility to ensure the safety of the slower road/pavement/space users and move themselves to get around those slower people or vehicles safely.

Cars should not expect cyclists to get out of their way.

Cyclists should not expect joggers to get out of their way.

Joggers should not expect pedestrians to get out of their way.

This really is SIMPLE (despite Naga Munchetty's inane witterings on BBC Breakfast the other day and despite also the indignant protestations of Andrew castle on LBC too).

 

Now OK. Sure. This may affect me harder than many as I'm clinically hyper-aware or if you like, hyper-sensitive.

No, by that I don't mean that if you tell me I have big ears, I'll immediately burst into tears -  but what it does mean is that I will be sitting in the garden talking to someone and I will have already noticed the rose chafer flying around the trees 50 yards away to the south, over your shoulder - and the KLM aeroplane flying into the wind, high in the northern sky ... and the fact that in thirty seconds a sparrowhawk will fly overhead as I've heard the starlings' alarm calls in the western valley below not to mention I've heard a squirrel getting angry at I presume a cat or a dog or a fox from a poplar tree 100 yards to the east that I can't even see as there's a house in the way.

I see stuff and hear stuff and FEEL stuff before you even know its there. You may never know its there. But I see and hear it ALL.

I don't go outside to have a spot of "me time" and mull over a few things - I spend my time outside being completely mindful. Aware of everything around me and IN the moment. It's quite exhausting sometimes - as two TV producers will attest to as they interviewed me in my garden a few years ago and I demonstrated to them ALL of the above (rose chafer, sparrowhawk, KLM plane, squirrel, cat) in five minutes, WHILST chatting to them about their TV programme.

So.... yes... I WILL spot people on the roads waaaay before they spot me - so in some cases I get exasperated with these people before I even give them a chance to get out of my way - I'm already crossing the road to get out of their way!

That all said, even our local postwoman (who really is a nice woman generally) takes a daily run down the pavements at present - and as she does so she unthinkingly scatters people into the road and hedges - be those people be healthy men like me or old women or even people like my wife and my two small children. It would be fair to say that I don't think I'll be as polite to her as I used to be when all this is over.

 

Finally, whilst I'm on one - a note to 99% of the British public who (incredibly) believe that on a road with no pavements, you should walk down the side of the road on which you would be driving if you were in a car - i.e. with the traffic, rather than towards the oncoming traffic.

Jesus did indeed PIGGING WEEP. 

That is the EXACT opposite of what you should do. And what you should do (walk on the side facing oncoming traffic rather than facing away from it) makes PERFECT sense, if you, for one millisecond, engage your pea-sized brains to think about it.

 

So.

To summarise then.

KERRRREIST!!!

 

(Stay safe grapple fans, and as far as possible... calm).

TBR

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) covid 19 hedgehog joggers https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/a-message-to-joggers Sun, 29 Mar 2020 10:42:08 GMT
Two hedgehogs again https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/two-hedgehogs-again A quick post tonight - we're all a bit frazzled after all, aren't we?

Regular readers of this blog might remember we had two hedgehogs in the garden(s) last year - a large one, which we KNOW was run over and killed late in the season and a wee one, which wasn't.

Well... as you know, the wee one has woken from its slumber again and is taking food from my hedgehog feeder - but now it has been joined by a very fast bigger hedgehog - video below shot last night on the Browning trail cam (PLEASE buy Browning trail cams - they're SO much better than the garbage pumped out by Bushnell!).

So... we have two hedgehogs again in the garden(s). Which I'm very happy about - as we have FAR fewer frogs this year than any other year since I dug the pond - more on that soon.

Stay safe all.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/two-hedgehogs-again Wed, 25 Mar 2020 17:58:51 GMT
Strangely... joyless. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/strangely-joyless This should be the BEST time of year. (No... that really isn't Christmas - that's the worst time).

The leaves are unfurling. 

Poplar leaves in our garden.Poplar leaves in our garden.

The ground is drying.

The ladybirds and bee-flies are sunning themselves.

The celandines are filling ditches.

 

The hedgehogs are waking from slumber.

The mornings (and evenings!) are getting lighter.

The days are now finally longer than the nights.

Bluebells will be with us in a fortnight or so.

And swallows too.

The warmth of the sun almost literally warms your heart at this time of year.

 

But 2020... well... seems quite joyless right now.

We're lucky we have a big garden I suppose - a garden where our boys can play and see and touch all kinds of amazing stuff (from frogspawn to hedgehog poo - I know, I know... we're weird - deal with it).

Stay safe grapple fans.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) 2020 spring https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/strangely-joyless Sun, 22 Mar 2020 07:03:03 GMT
Look who's back... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/look-whos-back

Going for a wee bowl of cat food that I've hidden behind one of our water butts, in a place where no cats (or foxes) can get to it. Last night.

I think this is our single surviving hedgehog from last year (the small one - the large one was sadly run over, remember?).

Welcome back!

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/look-whos-back Tue, 17 Mar 2020 15:47:56 GMT
Not as planned. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/not-as-planned Mid March then, and as normal this is EXACTLY the time of year that "our" frogs start spawning in the garden.

Only THIS year at present, we have no spawn in the pond as yet. And no biblical plague of frogs yet either, it seems...

Instead, our first lump of spawn was laid in our.... birdbath (well... more of a drinking tray for the local hedgehogs).

Not really what I'd planned!

I presume that with the weather significantly picking up this week (that's what the forecast says, Anyhoo) that "our" frogs will start to spawn en.masse from this week - although to REALLY get their juices flowing, they'd need a full moon - and they'll not get that for three weeks or so.

Watch this space...

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/not-as-planned Sat, 14 Mar 2020 13:30:02 GMT
Accidental weasels. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/accidental-weasels How many weasels have you chanced upon?

One?

Two?

Three?

Very possibly none, I expect.

I've seen four or five stoats now and attracted (called) a few weasels (much harder to see I think) in my time, after hearing them in long grass - but I've only accidentally chanced upon two weasels. Ever. In my life.

The first "accidental weasel" I chanced upon was in the year 2000.

I worked at a craft bakery in Hazlemere (Bucks) and lived in Beaconsfield at the time.

At the start of a summer's evening in that year, as I cycled through rural(ish) Penn to start work at around 7pm that evening, a weasel (definitely a weasel not a stoat) raced across the single track road in front of my bike.

It left a hedge and crossed the road westward into someone's drive.

By the time I reached the drive (it was a hill I was cycling up!) it had gone. But it was lovely to see and I remember it like it was yesterday.

But it wasn't yesterday.

It was, in fact, twenty years ago, this year!

 

Today, twenty years later, I chanced upon my most recent and only my second ever "accidental weasel".

I was nearing the end of my daily five-mile-walk (to keep my back muscles in check after slipping two lumbar discs a few years ago) in Binfield, Berkshire - and again it (a weasel again, definitely not a stoat) raced across the busy (this time) road maybe 70 yards in front of me into someone's front garden hedge.

 

Two "accidental weasels".

Twenty years.

Some people reading this may know me quite well and know very well that I tend to see (or notice I suppose) EVERYTHING.

So if I've only seen two accidental weasels in twenty years... well... I guess that tells it's own story.

These delightful wee animals are awfully hard to see.

 

How about you then?

How many accidental weasels have you seen?

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) weasel https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/accidental-weasels Mon, 09 Mar 2020 17:58:28 GMT
Just two weeks to go. Waiiittttt.... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/just-two-weeks-to-go-waiiittttt The weathermen and women on TV will tell you that Spring sprung on 1st March - but that is weatherman (meteorological) Spring - and really means nothing - only March, April May is easier to remember than a varying day in the 2nd or 3rd week of March each year, to a varying day in the second or third week of June each year. But that IS what true (astronomical) Spring actually means.

So... Spring this year starts in two weeks. 
Exactly.

Hold on now. We're nearly there...

(Photos taken a few days ago)

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Spring https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/3/just-two-weeks-to-go-waiiittttt Fri, 06 Mar 2020 11:30:00 GMT
Neither "accreditation" nor "exposure" pays our bills. (Please PAY photographers). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/neither-accreditation-nor-exposure-pays-our-bills-please-pay-photographers I (honestly) hope this post doesn't upset the chap who was yesterday, the most recent person (in a long line over the last decade or so) to ask me for permission to use my images for a scientific publication (or for other purposes), without paying for the use. 

At least this chap (the latest chap) asked me... (some don't) and he seems to be a nice chap.  

So I've blacked out his name and the name of the organisation he works* for in the screenshots below. (*Yes.. he is an employee of his organisation, not a volunteer).

 

This chap's email to me yesterday. (Again I hope he isn't upset by this... this is why I've blacked out his name and organisation).

 

And my rather short (I'm sorry to say now) reply, today:

 

 

Look.

As photographers, we're all more than a little peeved with this stubborn notion that whilst other artistic work commands a price (sometime a heavy price) - photographers will give away our work for free. For "full accreditation" or "exposure" etc.

My mortgage provider doesn't accept "accreditation" as a payment. Nor "exposure". 

Not only that, but my (and others') photographers take TIME. And SKILL. And.... wait for it... MONEY.

Now I don't intend to lie to you and tell you that I own a £1000 camera and a series of £500 lenses.

I don't.

But I do own two DSLRs (about 7 years old, both of them - and a couple of lenses (older than that!) and some expensive batteries and chargers and a tripod or two and a remote trigger - and a laptop and a cataloguing and basic editing bit of software (Lightroom Classic) and a monitor and two external hard drives on which to store and backup my images. Not to mention a trail camera and a few articles of clothing that make me blend into the countryside. And a pair of binoculars and a sturdy car which needs to be insured and taxed and MOT'd and fuelled  before I can take it into the countryside to spots where I take my images.

Then I spend HOURS and HOURS and DAYS and WEEKS and MONTHS in the field. Always have done.

All this costs real money.

None of it comes free.

If I painted an oil painting of what I photograph - you'd pay dearly for it. 

If I wrote a lyrical piece on the wildlife I photograph - ditto.

If I photographed your wedding - would you ask me to consider "exposure" or "accreditation" as your payment?

No?

So why do you continue to believe that I will give my other photographic images away for free?

 

These images, again, take time and money to produce.

 

The go-to-card for people asking for free-use of my images is often that they are charities or third-sector organisations.

I'm afraid now that doesn't matter to me.

I've had a recent run-in with someone giving away my "swift photos" for free over the last few years, without even asking me. 

This is unacceptable I'm afraid.

He should have known better.

He does now.

 

I'm now sick and tired of being asked to give away my work for free - and have changed my "about" page to reflect that (did so several months ago in fact).

I just wish all photographers would follow suit.

Our work costs money to make - like everyone else's work.

Please, please now extend us the courtesy of acknowledging that and offering us real money for their use.

TBR.

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) photography use https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/neither-accreditation-nor-exposure-pays-our-bills-please-pay-photographers Tue, 25 Feb 2020 15:36:45 GMT
Wet wind worry https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/wet-wind-worry A quick post today to see despite the great news of our local barn owls pairing up properly in the last week and now very much roosting together - I remain really worried about them at present.

We seem to be living in a stuck Jetstream right now. Produced and strengthened, I hear, by the cold air mass over North America (whether that is directly attributable to anthropogenically-accelerated climate change would be another discussion) and this has resulted in a very strong Jetstream sat right over us, for weeks.

High winds (20MPH plus and gusting regularly at over 40MPH), driving rain and floods seem now, after the last month or so, to be an everyday occurrence.

And this is a REAL problem for our barn owls.

 

Firstly, our British Barn owls are pretty-well the most northerly examples of their species (Tyto alba alba) in the world. In fact... I think I was taken to see the most northerly breeding barn owl pair in the world at the tip of north Scotland, when I was about 16. They're right on the edge of their range here.

And there's a reason for that.

They're basically pretty cr@p in the rain. And cr@p in the wind too. Which is all they get for days (or weeks, currently) at a time here in the UK!

 

Wind.

Barn owls are especially reliant on their superb hearing to hunt. They need to hear their vole prey rustle in the tussocky meadows they hunt over. Which is fine, most of the time. Unless it's blowing a hoolie - in which case, ALL the tussocks are rustling and they can hear bugger all voles over all that racket.

 

Rain.

Barn owls fly silently. Like small, round, floaty ghosts. They manage this because of their exceptionally-soft feathers, which are not very oily and therefore not very waterproof. These feathers don't tend to work well in the rain. So barn owls really don't hunt well in the rain. They'd rather not even get wet to be honest... let alone wet for any period of time, whilst hunting in a mon-pigging-soon.

 

Again, at present it feels like we have been living in a wet wind tunnel for the past few weeks - so much so in fact that I am constantly remarking to my eldest son (who watches the local barn owls with me) that I'm amazed they're still alive. They must be STARVING every other night at least, right now - and I'm convinced that if this bleeding awful* weather doesn't change soon, they'll (our local pair) give up any attempt at breeding this year before they've even started - many birds do this (including my favourites, swifts) - what's the point of risking everything to bring up a family if you can't even find enough food for yourself.

 

I'm even, right now, tentatively considering breaking the golden rule with wildlife watching - that is to get involved. I'm starting to consider buying a bag of frozen weaner rats from a pet food store - with a view to defrosting one or two and wedging them on top of one of our owls' favourite posts during windy nights.

There are inherent risks with that sort of idea though - as there are with any "feeding wildlife" ideas. 

Firstly you are getting involved, unnaturally - you are unnaturally managing a natural system. You are therefore OBLIGED to not have that wildlife reliant on your actions. Nor should you effectively lure your wildlife out to your unnatural food and therefore put them at risk.

With regards to feeding wild barn owls defrosted weaner rats, you should realise that barn owls probably won't take unnatural, dead, white, cold baby rats at first anyway - unless they discover by accident that they're edible.

They need to be defrosted safely. Overnight, in a fridge. Not at room temperature or hotter or worse still in a microwave. Then they should be put on the owls' favourite perch within 24 hours.

Finally you should never get the owls used to the idea that they could come out in the driving rain to pick up your food from the perch. This could waterlog their feathers and kill them.

A lot to think about eh?

But right now... with this awful* weather seeming to be never-bleeding-ending - I am considering it...

TBR

 

 

*awful weather:    Someone (Christ knows who) once said "There's no such thing as bad weather. Just a bad choice of clothes".

What bull.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl weather https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/wet-wind-worry Mon, 24 Feb 2020 11:52:22 GMT
Our barn owls have paired up! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/our-barn-owls-have-paired-up Yes. This morning, on my walk, I watched sparrows take straw up into a local roof.

And today I also saw a magpie taking mud from our saturated garden and packing her nest with it... in our big fir tree.

But that's NOTHING compared to what Ben and I saw yesterday.

 

Regular readers of this blog might know that my eldest boy (Ben) and I have been watching the local barn owls (a mile or two SW of Binfield village) for a couple of months now.

We've noted a male and a female owl. Interact with each other a few times, over a favourite stubble field.

But not roost together.

Well... not until yesterday.

Yesterday, I drove us up to their patch and we saw both the female AND now the male too in the (female's original) roost for the first time this year.

They were both there this evening too - with the male leaving the joint (now) roost a good half hour earlier than the female.

The clip below (on YouTube) is audio only  - I've blacked out the visuals to protect the exact location of this schedule 1 bird.

I hope you enjoy it anyway - you'll hear my boy almost keel over with excitement and joy at seeing BOTH his favourite birds "team up" in the female's roost.

Now. Whilst it really is superb news that these owls have paired up - all barn owls are going through HELL at present what with all this wind and rain.

They are having HUGE trouble hunting, reliant on dry weather as they are, to keep airborne and still(ish) weather to hear their prey.

I desperately hope they catch some voles tonight... because if these inclement conditions continue, as I rather depressingly explained to Ben in the car tonight - these owls will abandon any attempt at breeding this year, before they even start. (No point risking everything in a breeding attempt if you can barely catch enough food to survive yourselves). 

Or... as the old joke goes: "It's too wet to woo, for owls..."

Cross your fingers, dear readers.

And your toes.

More soon.

TBR

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/our-barn-owls-have-paired-up Tue, 18 Feb 2020 20:22:28 GMT
...The Menace. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/-the-menace Dennis (really? Dennis?) has been (is being) pretty wild eh?

Even our local birds are being blown out of their trees...

Yes, OK. That's a plastic eagle owl … or at least the body of one - I couldn't see the head.

No... that grey blob behind the plastic owl body isn't its head, but one of a dozen or so dog poo bags chucked into the brambles by all you oh-so-considerate dog owners who nonsensically bleat that it's only the minority who behave like that.

The owl was nailed/tied to a big branch on an old oak tree outside someone's house just up the road. For some reason, they had nailed 2 owls to this tree (there's one left - see the photo below) but it seems Storm Dennis (really? Dennis?) cruelly ripped this avian couple apart last night.

It started raining here on Friday night and doesn't seem intent on stopping any time soon. To that extent, our flat roof (covering our side passage and two "outbuildings") has developed another leak this weekend (to go with the one that I knew about) - and the flashing around our chimney has developed another (to go with the leak that I identified last week after storm Ciara).

None of these are really serious leaks. I've put a bucket or two down in the attic (well... a mop bucket and a litter tray) and that seems to be doing the trick until we can get a roofer in.  But we will eventually (this summer probably) have to look to get these little niggles looked at.

And in the garden - well the fox (and hedgehog) tunnel under our tallest fence has been completely flooded. The local foxes have dug two big tunnels under our fences - big enough for a relatively big dog (I'd say... not just a big fox) to squeeze through, if it felt it had to. But looking at the photo below, nothing's gonnae use that tunnel for a while.

Finally, I, of course, went down to our local toad crossing last night (and this morning on my 5 mile walk - to photograph the road so you lucky, luck readers get an idea of what our "toad crossing" road looks like (below)) and helped nineteen of the little blighters cross the road.

Plenty more were squashed last night though - including one or two by the only car that went down that road in the forty minutes or so that I was there. At speed. Not even noticing the toads all over their road. *sighhhhh*.

I think I'm going to contact the local biodiversity officer of the council and suggest (strongly) that they need to put a toad sign up. 

Right, that shallot.

I'll leave you with photos of three of the nineteen toads I helped on their way last night...

Keep dry eh?

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) toad https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/-the-menace Sun, 16 Feb 2020 12:59:56 GMT
It's going to be a WILD night. Literally. (A post NOT for the squeamish)... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/its-going-to-be-a-wild-night-literally  

Toad crossingToad crossing

 

_________________________________________________________

 

EDIT: 15th Feb at 0930hrs. Please note - the original post below was written by me YESTERDAY (14th Feb) at around 1900hrs and put down as scheduled for automatic (delayed) publication at 0800hrs this morning.

I wrote it in such a way yesterday, so it would *read* that I wrote it this morning - I simply scheduled it for publication this morning as I didn't want to post twice in one day and I knew I wouldn't be able to get down to our local toad crossing last night.

Well... I did walk along our toad crossing this morning - after the predicted (below) few toads used their toad crossing last night - and what I saw there was very sad.

I'll continue this edit after my original post below...

 

_________________________________________________________

 

Quick one today, grapple fans.

I've already predicted (and seen) the start of the annual toad migration this year (last weekend) and while last night would have seen a few toads making their traditional annual journey from wood to breeding pond, as it was damp and about 10C here.... (I was busy so didn't get out to check our local crossing) - TONIGHT will be HUGE for the toads at my and your local crossings.

We're expecting Storm Dennis to bring lots of rain of course AND very high overnight temperatures for February (something like 13C here tonight I hear).

Now, wind aside, (toads aren't really affected by wind - stop sniggering at the back) those conditions are PERFICK MA, PERFICK for toads to get their crawl on, en masse.

Tonight's the start of toad season proper. Mark my words.

Get down to your local toad crossing after dark. But do stay safe too, out there.

It's going to be a wild night. Literally.

 

________________________________________________

 

Continued edit. 15th Feb at 0930hrs.

Yes, I did do my 5 mile walk around the area early this morning, taking in the toad crossing as I walked.

And I'm afraid to say... this (below) is what I found.

Now... I'm pretty sure that was a relatively quiet night at this particular toad crossing. Yes… I predicted a few toads would be moving last night (and so they did - perhaps more than a few, as it happens) but TONIGHT WILL be the big one.

Please, please, if you can. Find out where your local toad crossing is (use my hyperlinks above), get down there tonight (stay safe mind) and help these beautiful creatures avoid Pirelli and Goodyear for another year.

Thanks

TBR

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) migration rule da nation toad toad crossing with version https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/its-going-to-be-a-wild-night-literally Sat, 15 Feb 2020 08:00:00 GMT
"Station squabble". My intrigue. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/-station-squabble-my-intrigue You may have recently noticed that  Sam Rowley's "Station Squabble" below won the "Peoples' vote" in this year's Wildlife Photographer of the year competition. Not the overall prize, the peoples' vote (perhaps even more important then!).

And you might have noticed that yet again, *yawwwwn*, the keyboard warriors have started pouring scorn on this wonderful photo above.

 

Want my thoughts?

No?

Oh well... you're gonnae get them anyway (as you must be here for a reason?)

 

I think it's a superb image.

For many reasons - not least of all it's an image that we can all relate to. (Well... we Brits anyway).

I also love it because unlike many other award-winning wildlife photographs, the subject of this particular award-winning photograph, (i.e. the wildlife, in this case the two mice) only fills a tiny, tiny proportion of the whole frame. At a guess... 0.66% (1/150th)? I LOVE that.

I also like it as it really intrigues me.

When I lived and worked in London (ohhhh over a decade now) not that I was taking any photographs at the time (I didn't have a camera) but I was certainly aware that one wasn't allowed to take photos on or in London Underground land.

I guess that's changed now that everyone has a camera on their phone - it would be a bit weird banning photography on the tube now - although I wouldn't be surprised if it still wasn't allowed.

So how did Sam take this shot?

It was with a bona fide camera, a pretty standard Nikon (not a £5000 D5 or anything though),. and a pretty standard lens (again... not a £10,000 500mm f4 prime lens or anything) - but obviously a "proper" DSLR around Sam's neck - as he went into the Tube.

Also did he really lie on his belly on the platform for hours and hours, waiting for the perfect shot?

Well... if he did, he has waaay bigger "cojones" than me - I don't think I'd lie down for more than five seconds on a central London tube platform (as that's where he did shoot this - although he hasn't publicised exactly which station).

But that's my point really.

He may well have laid down on the central London tube station platform for hours and hours - so I can only assume he got permission for this. From TFL (Transport for London). And are we to assume therefore that this shot was taken in the middle of the night, when either no trains were running or very, very few passengers were about?

Finally - on the subject of passengers - WHO IS THAT in the background (the mice are almost pointing to this blurred person, sitting on a bench at the far end of the platform - a person wearing what looks like blue jeans and a green top)?

If it is a passenger waiting for a train - then I'd be amazed if they were OK with the photo being taken of them (they wouldn't know that they were out of focus in the shot).

Or....

is it....

the photographer himself?

With a remote shutter switch in his hand -triggered just at the right moment when the two mice wander across his Nikon's field of view 40 yards or so away down the platform?

Well... I don't really suppose it is Sam, the photographer, to be honest (as he'd have said it was if it was him... and of top of that it appears to be a woman doesn't it?) - but my intrigue is still boiling over with this wonderful image.

It's SUPERB.

I love it.

But purely from a technical and logistical (and legal!) point of view - I'd just LOVE to know how he got this shot.

Wonderful stuff Mr. Rowley.

A very, very well deserved award!

 

 

Oh and by the way... Sam Rowley, just like yours truly, graduated from Bristol University's biology department, although Sam looks like he graduated about twenty years after me!

Hmmm.... I think, as a fellow Bris biology (well... zoology for me... (same department though)) graduate, I might just give him a bell and ask him for his "Station squabble" shot secrets....

_________________________________________________________

 

EDIT. 15th Feb at around 0930am.

Well well well.... looks like Sam DID lie on his belly on a central London tube station for hour upon hour. Whilst the station was open - and full of drunk punters! Big, big cojones indeed! Although when I was his age, (early mid 20s ish) I'd have probably done similar!

What inspirational stuff eh?!

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bristol unveristy peoples choice station squabble wildlife photographer of the year https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/-station-squabble-my-intrigue Fri, 14 Feb 2020 15:51:28 GMT
Super moon toads. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/super-moon-toads Just the quickest of posts this evening to say Ben and I are having GREAT success following our barn owls recently - the photo below is of Ben looking at last night's "Snow supermoon" on another of our (successful) owl hunts.

 

Also - please be on the lookout NOW for toads at their traditional toad crossings.

As I've blogged here once or twice (or thrice!) before, all the toads need in February or March (generally) is a little wet in the air and night-time temperatures to be over saaaaay 9C - and they're on the move.
Storm Ciara (or whatever) today brought those exact conditions here, so Ben and I went on our first toad patrol of the season at our nearest toad crossing and we managed to spot our first toad of the year and help him across the road.

Toad crossing (2)Toad crossing (2)

Keep 'em peeled grapple fans...

More soon.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl supermoon toad https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/super-moon-toads Sun, 09 Feb 2020 19:40:48 GMT
Giving thanks and thanks for nothing. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/giving-thanks-and-thanks-for-nothing Disclaimer: The two (massively-cropped) photos in this post were taken by me this morning with my tiny wee pocket camera. I know they're awful. Barn owls are schedule 1 birds and it is an offence in the eyes of the law (1981 wildlife and countryside act) to deliberately OR recklessly disturb these birds at or near their roosts or nests. My boy and I watch these birds from a large distance and generally don't even take photos (there's no point from the distance we put between the owls and us).

 

It struck me this morning, as my eldest boy and I watched "our" two local barn owls quarter over a stubble field near Wokingham, SW of Binfield village in Berkshire, just before sunrise, that what I was experiencing was, I suppose, one of the greatest pleasures I could hope to experience in my life and I should be thankful for that.

I stood beside my boy and watched the delight creep over his face as he gaped through my new binoculars at these beautiful white owls, in the gathering dawn, with not a soul around, other than his dad. He was privileged to see these owls this morning, I was privileged to be able to show them to him (again) and I am truly thankful for that.

I should say he nearly exploded with joy when we watched the female owl drop onto a big vole just before 07:55am (so about fifteen minutes after sunrise this morning) and then fly back to her roost with it in her beak (terrible photo below).

It also struck me this morning, on the first day in what … nearly fifty years... when we are at least legally out of the EU, rather than actually out, that I should also perhaps be a little sad, watching these beautiful owls with my eldest son, who is only just seven years old, after all. 

Sad?

Yes. Sad.

We're all agnostic I suppose, but I would also chalk myself up as an atheist - but I see little point debating the subject of whether God exists or not with anyone really. It's futile. You either believe there is bearded, supernatural, all powerful, omnipresent being sat on a cloud in the sky or you don't.

An all-loving supernatural being by the way, kind enough to give some children bone cancer... and loving enough to ensure there are insects in some part of the world which do NOTHING ELSE but burrow into childrens' eyes and blind them.

If you do believe in the above, then you also probably see the merits of ensuring there are spaces in our law-making establishments left open to be filled by leaders of your religion (you know... that religion about the all-loving bone cancer-giving supernatural being I mentioned above) and you may even believe that your all-loving God (yes... the same one that "designed" those eye burrowing insects) gives the human race a good "moral code" to stick by. Hmmmm.

You may even believe that your religion doesn't hold back progress.  OKaaaaay….

Yes... you either believe that (palpable) BS... or you don't. You are, of course, entitled to hold your opinions, whether they're demonstrably ridiculous or not.

 

Likewise, I'm not going to resurrect the argument (academic or not) surrounding Brexit after this post. To do so would be futile.  You either believed the BS spouted by Farage et.al. or you didn't. Personally, in what....almost four years of Brexit... I've not heard ONE intelligent argument which adds any real weight to the notion that leaving the EU is in any way a good idea.

People often vomit up their vapid clichés of "sovereignty" or "freedom" without knowing what either word actually means, when asked to defend their Brexit mentality. 

Actually. Worse still is the argument that "I voted out because I don't like how the Northern powerhouses are treating countries like Greece in the EU". That is nothing more than a coward's reasoning - and it would be fair to say that if you've always thought like that, you wouldn't have been my friend in the school playground -  and nor would you be now.

Rather than walk away, I'd suggest you try to quickly grow a pair - and whilst you're at it, a spine - and then start challenging what you perceive to be bullies.

Bit too late probably for you now though, eh?

 

No, it strikes me that the vast majority of people who voted "out", also still find the "Carry On" films funny (rather than the embarrassing garbage that they are) and find people like Greta Thunberg intolerable. They'll often invariably be hysterical monarchists, quite content (over the moon in fact) to prostrate themselves in front of those they think have the "special blood" and call those special-blood people (with no smirking) "your majesty" or "your highness". Oh we'll grow up one day and disestablish the church AND ALSO then abolish the monarchy - but not in my lifetime I fear.

Look, I wouldn't go as far to say that in general, the people who voted Brexit are stupid -  although I certainly would firmly apply that label to the handful of Scots I know who voted AGAINST the proposal for Scotland to leave the UK in 2014 (so a vote to stay in the UK) and also voted for the UK to LEAVE the EU in 2016. Wow! If you voted that way, then there's little hope for you I'm afraid. I don't think I could describe blind stupidity any better.

No. The majority of people who voted FOR Brexit probably aren't stupid. Ignorant possibly, but that's fine. I'm ignorant about 99% of everything I'm sure. Ignorance only becomes problematic where it is wilful ignorance.

 

That all said, what they (you?) did do when you voted OUT - is (stupidly? You're reading this wildlife blog because you enjoy wildlife no?) vote for less environmental protection for everything in the UK.

Including less protection for our beautiful barn owls that my boy(s) and I (and you?) take so much pleasure from watching.

(Think I'm spouting hyperbole? Read this then).

You also voted to give my boys less money in their pockets, fewer rights and far less freedom in the future.

Freedom that you yourselves HAD - but have now denied my boys.

So.

Today. 

On behalf of my boys and also on behalf of the owls that they love:

Thanks for that.

Thanks for nothing.

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/2/giving-thanks-and-thanks-for-nothing Sat, 01 Feb 2020 19:14:00 GMT
Daffy. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/1/daffy January then.

When cultivated varieties of daffodil (so Narcissus agg. rather than the wild Narcissus pseudonarcissus) start to flower on roadsides and on suburban roundabouts (as in the photos below - which I snapped today on my very small mobile phone).

Of course, January is also generally the month (but sometimes it'll be as "early" as December) when people start noticing these "early daffs" and start shouting about them on soeshul meedja, proclaiming that they've never seen daffodils flower in January before and that these winter-flowering daffodils are proof positive of climate change etc etc....

*Sighhhhh*.

*E  v  e  r  y     s  i  n  g  l  e     y  e  a  r*

The fact that they've not seen daffodils flowering in January before is more of a nod to the fact that they've not really noticed them before, rather than they didn't exist.

These January-flowering daffodils are cultivated, after all, to flower IN January. Or February. Or even December sometimes.

They are literally designed to flower now.

And have been doing so for years.

And years.

And years.

 

There is a lot of demonstrable, observable evidence of moving or shifting phenological datasets in the natural world - and many of these shifts do indeed point to climate change (or anthropogenically-accelerated climate change, to be more exact) being an incontrovertible fact.  Yes... 'CC' really is a given these days.

But varieties of cultivated daffodils, bred to flower in January, actually doing just that, i.e. flowering in January, on a Bracknell industrial estate roundabout does NOT form part of this evidence.

And like I say, if you've not seen daffs flowering in January before... you've just not noticed them before. They always have been. They always were.

That's all.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) daffodil https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/1/daffy Thu, 23 Jan 2020 15:50:20 GMT
"Balance" and "Natural order" (sighhhhh). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/1/-balance-and-natural-order-sighhhhh I was reading this piece in the Grauniad today...

as I wanted to get a view on plants for birds...and I came across this comment from someone calling themselves TuityFruity.

I know, I know... one shouldn't read the comment section in online newspapers' pieces.

I read TuityFruity's comment and sighed.

TuityFruity's comment has now received a dozen "likes" or "markups"... the most well-received comment to the column I think - not that surprising really as most British wildlife lovers (and Guardian readers also) will think that the comment seems to make the most sense, mentioning "balance" etc, as it did.

TuityFruity's comment is BS though of course - and I started penning a response.

Then I remembered that I'd not be falling into the trap of commenting on online forums (fora?) this year as it really doesn't do me any good.

But I wrote my response anyway... and I reproduce it below. (I didn't add it to the comment section however).

Happy new year again, grapple fans.

 

 

"Redressing the balance"?

Oh dear.

A facile cliché often used by those who use other clichés like *shudder* "the natural order" (of things).

 

There is no order, no balance either.

Natural order is disorder. Some people might call this entropy.

Life and all the zoological and botanical (and mycological!) relationships within, is constantly fluid in nature. Dynamic. Moving... and in competition even.

The whole point of life is to perpetuate that life... and NOT to keep any balance. That's a particularly human concept.

 

There may be an *illusion* of order and balance - but this is just that - an illusion based on a momentary observation of a fluid system in chronic dynamic competition with all others.

Field voles haven’t evolved (or worse still, weren’t “designed") to hide well from barn owls so that the owls and voles can live in a balanced (or worse still “harmonious”) stasis. Likewise, “balance” isn’t the highest priority of owls.

This notion of balance and stasis is at best, nonsense.

Tuityfruity seems to exhibit all the hallmarks of someone only considering macro biology in her (I assume with an online moniker of TuityFruity, it’s a her) warped notion of balance, too.

What about the myriad of micro biology that she doesn’t see and therefore won’t often or ever consider? The beetles or nematodes or annelids or arachnids or fungi or bacteria or anything else that doesn’t make an obvious noise outside TuityFruity's window. Does bringing in large numbers of (hungry) birds to a small area - and covering the ground beneath the feeders with a load of highly alkali bird poo or food-drop or probing (for other things) beaks “redress the balance” for this unseen life. Of course not.

TuityFruity not only has tunnel vision. It’s filtered too. And myopic.

 

Even if there was "balance" (there just isn't), to suggest that because people have put decking up next door, your feeder full of fatty sunflower hearts which bring 30 greenfinches to 3 square foot of tree, for months on end, with all their associated diseases and predator-attracting results, redresses this errr… “balance” is simply, demonstrably, unequivocally, unambiguously incorrect.

 

Conservation is good of course. But it only conserves (or preserves really) the present (perhaps short lived) state of affairs. It does NOT keep any permanency of *shudder* "balance" or "order".

 

After reading my diatribe above, some may think I'm suggesting that you shouldn't feed birds as it's a bad thing to do and doesn’t help the birds.

I'm not saying that at all.

Feed the birds by all means... help the odd bird in times of need – and also get a load of personal pleasure from it – but…. be honest enough to admit that the primary reason for you feeding the birds is YOUR OWN pleasure – and not the birds’ wellbeing or any redressing of any perceived “balance”. (Sigh).

If you REALLY want to help the birds, plant more trees and bushes all over the place ... outside your tiny suburban garden. Oh - and try to live a somewhat less consumer led life whilst using thoughtless, vapid phrases like "balance" and “natural order” far, FAR less often.

 

Recommended further reading for TuityFruity and anyone else who believes in “natural order” and “balance” and “stasis”:

 

"Are British garden wildlife lovers harming wildlife?" (A blog post by me in November 2018).

 

The Red Queen by Matt Ridley (yes yes, I know we all think Ridley is a bit of a plonker these days… just read his early stuff… like Dawkins… and forget the rest).

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) balance natural order rant sigh https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/1/-balance-and-natural-order-sighhhhh Sun, 19 Jan 2020 19:12:49 GMT
2020 vision. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/1/2020-vision

 

Happy new year to all my reader.

I thought I'd kick off this year with a review.

A binoculars review.

Well... it is 2020 after all, so this optical equipment review is certainly apt!

 

I'm sure the regular reader of this blog will know I've never been comfortable with people calling me a "birdwatcher" or worse still... a "birder". (shudder).

Sure, I've been watching birds since I can remember (4 or 5 years old?) but then again I've been watching everything since that age.

Not just birds.

But insects too.

Mammals.

Fish.

Spiders.

Reptiles.

Amphibians.

Planes even.

Motorbikes.

Cars.

You get the picture. Pretty-well anything outside … that moves.

So I'm more of an "outsider" (in every sense) than a "birdwatcher".

From quite an early age, when I thought of your typical "birdwatcher" or "birder" (shudder), I thought of some middle-aged (or older) bloke (almost always a man), white, often called Nigel (apologies to any nice Nigel reading this), who spoke using his nose more than his mouth and often banged on about how many birds he'd seen in his life and why his £1000 pair of binoculars or spotting scope was so much superior to my second-hand TASCO rubbish.

I also often got the impression, after coming across these Nigels all the time, that they weren't really interested in the birds they professed to be interested in, missed a lot of other wildlife and sights and sounds whilst "birdwatching", bored me rigid... and to be frank they weren't the sort of people I wanted to associate with. At all.

The snobby optical equipment thing was a real stumbling block for me when I met "the Nigels".

I have never owned a pair of expensive binoculars. I couldn't possibly justify spending so much money on something like that. I couldn't afford them even if I could justify the expense!

So I lugged around my Grandfather's beaten up, old, heavy 20x50 whatever-they-weres for years... and basically got sneered at by the Nigels with their Leica or Zeiss binoculars.

For the last decade or so, my wife and I have been sharing a dirt-cheap pair of TASCO 10x42s, which were at least new when I bought them.

But now, after a little research, I decided to buy a new pair, as those TASCO binoculars have got badly scratched over the years and filled with all kind of gunk.

The pair I decided to buy is a (wait for it... you may not have heard of the brand before) pair of CARSON RD 8x42 binoculars.

I know. I know. I hadn't heard of them (Carson) before my research, either.

Look... the whole point of this blog post is to quickly review these EXCELLENT binoculars and demonstrate that you DON'T have to spend north of £500 or even north of £150 to get a decent, a very decent pair of binoculars - despite the protestations of the Leica and Zeiss Nigels, banging on about their ED glass.

 

So.

Why did I choose this pair - and what do I like about them?

 

 

  • I wanted a pair of good light gathering binoculars.  When you're looking at the light-gathering capabilities of binoculars, remember to divide the diameter of the objective lens (42mm in my case) by the magnification (8 in my case), giving you a figure (of 5.25 in my case). This is the effective exit pupil figure (EPF) of the binoculars in millimetres.  I didn't want this EPF to drop below 5.25 (even 5.0 would have been too low, so 10x50 for example would have been out for me). I actually think this is the MOST important figure to consider when looking at technical specs of binoculars for watching wildlife. Especially in dull old Britain. Wildlife tends to be most apparent at dawn or dusk (or night of course!) and without a good light-gathering capability in your pair of binoculars (so yes, an EPF of at least 5.25 if possible), then it doesn't matter that you have a 12X magnification or a 20X magnification in your binoculars - you won't be able to see that owl in the gloom, as you'll have an image that's too dark to see anything much and too shaky (more magnification means MUCH heavier binoculars).

 

  • I didn't want to spend more than £130 (I know, I know... I have a large amount of Scottish blood in me - what can I say).

 

  • I wanted the ocular lens diameter (the lens which you look through) to be at LEAST 20mm, if not more like 24mm. This makes looking through the binoculars and lining your eyes up to "get" the image, far easier for you - and also easier for kids who aren't used to binoculars. These Carson RD 8x42s have an ocular lens diameter of 23mm. MUCH better than my old TASCO binoculars.

 

  • I wanted all the lenses to be multi-coated, rather than some single coated. The Carson RD 8x42s are all multi-coated.

 

  • I wanted the prisms to be silver coated, making the efficiency of light reflection within the binoculars to be maximised. Tick there also.

 

  • I wanted them to be relatively light, easily adjustable and have lens covers which can remain attached to the binoculars. Final tick!

 

  • Finally... which wasn't on my list... these Carson RD 8x42s come in a very well-made, sturdy hard case - which will be GREAT for packing in  suitcases etc if we ever go abroad again - but not so good for putting in the driver's door compartment of my car I'm afraid. I drive a gurt big estate car which I call "the hearse". It's a big black Octavia Scout and generally it has plenty of space to store things. I always have my binoculars in my door cubby hole - but I'm afraid the rigid Carson RD case won't fit in that space. So they now go in, nekked. So to speak. That said, I think the Carson case is a plus point generally - like I say, I'm sure I'll be very happy about the sturdy case when I bung my binoculars in a suitcase.

 

I ordered these binoculars from Amazon and paid £120. 

So... no... these aren't cheapy cheap binoculars like ohhhh I dunno… Celestron or yes... Tasco.

But they are INCREDIBLE value for money I think. 

They arrived yesterday and I've already tested them out in the field.

 

  • Chromatic aberration and fringing is superb (for non ED glass), close focusing is great too, field of view isn't too bad (it's never going to be too bad at 8x magnification though - much more problematic at 10 or 12 or 20x magnification) and compared to our old TASCO 10x42s, it's like shining a torch on the subject. Chalk and cheese.

 

  • I'm blown away by the large ocular (where you put your eyes) lenses too. I am aware that as I get older and older, like everyone, I simply won't have the ability to open up my pupils as much as I could when I was 18 for example, (maybe I could've opened up my pupil to 7mm at 18yo, it will be more like 5mm now I'm past 45!), so perhaps 8x50 binoculars (with an EPF of 6.25 (that's 50/8 remember) would be wasted on me these days). Something around 5.25 is perfect (like my new Carson RD 8x42s) but also with a nice big ocular lens (of 23mm in this case).

 

  • Finally the eyepiece adjustment is great (I've started wearing reading glasses, or varifocals to be precise) since I turned 45, so it's handy to have 17mm of clearance for when I'm NOT wearing my glasses (most of the time in the field as my long range vision is still UNSURPASSED at present!) or when I am.

 

Grapple fans. The point I'm trying to make here is that these relatively cheap (you can probably pick them up on ebay for £100) binoculars are honestly SUPERB.

If these binoculars were available in the 1980s or 1990s, they'd have cost closer to £1000 than £100, believe me.

So no... you really don't have to spend many hundreds of pounds to get a nice set of binoculars that do the job really, REALLY well.

Oh sure, the snobby Nigels may still sneer. 

But I'm too old to care these days and even if I  did care, I'd honestly think it was they that had wasted their money, not me.

 

Right then. That's all for now.

If you get a chance, do read THIS review of these (award-winning I now see!) binoculars, which is far more detailed than my review above.

And do consider buying these excellent jobbies, if you're looking for a cheap(ish) new pair.

Or if not my Carson RD 8x42s, might I also recommend (even though I've not bought them, these also ticked all my boxes above):

Helios Nitrosport 8x42. Even cheaper than my Carson RD 8x42s at £80! With phase corrected lenses too! And no, I don't suppose you've heard of Helios binoculars either? Again... I'd not either - until I looked into the subject in detail over Christmas.

 

Of course... you could still consider buying these binoculars instead, especially if your name is.... Nigel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) binoculars carson rd 8x42 https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2020/1/2020-vision Thu, 09 Jan 2020 10:31:16 GMT
A bit batty? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/12/a-bit-batty My eldest and I are having great fun this winter "holiday" looking for and finding barn owls in the local countryside at dusk.

Yesterday was no exception - and our latest barn owl performed marvellously in front of us, silently quartering over the winter stubble field in the gloom as we crouched down, holding our breath(s).

Also... and it's worth noting this - yesterday, my eldest boy spotted the owl first - if it wasn't for him I may well have missed it! (My eyes and awareness are legendary generally... but I'm not superhuman and I LOVE IT when he sees something before me - it means I'm training him to "use his eyes" (a nod to long-standing readers of this blog there) well).

At dusk yesterday we also watched three roe deer and the usual big covey(s) of red-legged partridge and roosting jackdaws and two v-formation skeins of geese flying just over our heads to their roosts in a quite stunning sunset.

Then there were the rabbits of course and the tawny owls waking up and proclaiming their territories.

What we DIDN'T expect to see on the 30th December though... were BATS.

My eldest is 7 years old so is always in bed when bats tend to emerge (after dusk in the spring, summer and autumn) and told me last night that he'd never seen a bat before (despite us being luck enough to have TWO pips hunt in our garden each dusk during the typical "bat season").

Yesterday though, we watched two bats (common or soprano pips) hunt around a local church and then saw another on our walk back from watching the barn owl a few miles away.

Three bats out in the day (effectively) and in the winter (definitely).

Mad. Or... *ahem* batty?

I reported this as a footnote to my latest barn owl report on the "Berks bird sightings" website and a local young birdwatcher kindly emailed me to tell me that he had seen two soprano pips at Windsor Great Park on the same day (yesterday).

Whether this is a sign of global warming or not is debatable - but it certainly is a sign of a very mild couple of days in late December and a few hungry local bats hoovering up the odd winter moth and gnat that is around....

 

Happy 2020, grapple fans.

 

 

 

Below. Moon. Belfry. Venus. (last night).

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl buzzard canada goose common pipstrelle egyptian goose rabbit red-legged partridge roe deer soprano pipistrelle tawny owl https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/12/a-bit-batty Tue, 31 Dec 2019 09:54:59 GMT
Floody great! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/12/floody-great Merry Christmas to the reader (s?!) of this wildlife blog.

A quick question to start this wee blog post.

The photo below was taken by me at our local farm yesterday, after we had had our Christmas lunch at a local pub.

The photo is of a flooded single track road around a winter crop field at the farm.

That said, the flooded single track farm road is not quite how it appears in this photo.

But why not?

Answer at the end of this blog post!

 

 

My eldest boy and I spent the afternoon (well... hour at dusk anyway) on the hunt for our local barn owls, which we've not seen for months and have had such a dreadful autumn.

In case you weren't aware (I'm sure you were... but anyway....) UK barn owls are at the northern edge of their worldwide territory in the UK (in fact I think I saw the one of the world's most northerly (at the time) pair of barn owls in North Scotland in the mid eighties) because... well... basically... they just don't DO rain. In order to fly silently and hear their prey, barn owls have fluffy edges to feathers with very little oil in them - they basically can't afford to get too wet or they get waterlogged, can't fly, can't hunt and therefore can't eat and can't survive.

And we've had night after night of rain round 'ere this Autumn.

But like I say, at dusk yesterday, Ben and I decided to go hunting barn owls on foot, rather than by car... and we found one! HALLE and indeed LUJAH!

Not only that, but I showed Ben how to call one towards one, by mimicking a vole. 

My eldest boy now thinks his Dad is friends with all the barn owls!

Anyway... it's lovely to have seen one of our local barn owls again last night and lovely to be able to show them to my boy(s) rather than just go and see these things on my own, like I've pretty-well been doing for the past forty-odd years!

 

 

OK.

The photo of the flooded single track farm road then.

Did YOU spot what was wrong with it?

The photo is reproduced again below...

Only...

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

THIS TIME...

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

 

v

It's the RIGHT WAY ROUND (flipped vertically 180 degrees).

Just to clarify then, the first two times I put the photo of this flooded single-track road under a still, blue Christmas Day sky on this wildlife blog, I posted it upside down (the sky at the bottom of the shot and the reflected trees in the flooded road at the TOP of the photo).

The reproduction above is the right way round (flooded reflection of trees and sky at bottom of shot and actual sky at top) and I've added accompanying text and a red ring around a bit of floating flotsam in the flood to show the viewer that this photo is now the right way round. You'll see in the first shot at the top of this post that that bit of flotsam is still there... but at the top of the shot... in the supposed sky.

There were other visual clues of course, which you may well see a little better now that I've explained it all.

 

Right then.

I have tea to make.

Merry Christmas to you... and all of us here at Black Rabbit Towers (including the barn owls) wish you a peaceful and prosperous 2020.

Until then then...

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl christmas flood https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/12/floody-great Thu, 26 Dec 2019 16:54:05 GMT
Watching one's carbos. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/12/watching-ones-carbos Everyone has a crow in their neighbourhood with a call that sounds like the ring of an old phone, amirite?  And when I say "old phone", I don't mean an old smartphone, but one of the first cordless phones or an old bakelite rotary phone with a handset complete with transmitter at one end and receiver at t'other.

Yes. Everyone has a crow in their neighbourhood that sounds like that. A standout crow, if you like. Shunned by its brethren and er... sesren? for NOT being able to produce a proper crow CAW like THIS.... but instead like THIS.

But we lucky folk in North Bracknell not only have an "old phone crow" but also a standout cormorant too.

 

Every day if I can, but certainly a few times a week at least, I try to take a five mile walk around the 'hood. These walks get me away from my computer, clear my mind, strengthen my back and probably do me the world of good I expect.

Regular readers of this blog may appreciate that whilst on my walks, I tend to notice the local wildlife.

And I've REGULARLY noticed a rogue cormorant flying in large laps around North Bracknell.  On its tod. Sometimes high. Sometimes quite low. But almost invariably (if that isn't an oxymoron... and in fact it is!) stubbornly just flying round and round in giant laps above North Bracknell. And never seeming to land.

 

It's weird.

It should be on the Thames with the others. 

Or on one of many large reservoirs  and/or gravel pits in this part of the world, where one can find (much to the anglers' disgust) dozens of these (former) sea or coastal birds.

But our rogue cormorant here over North Bracknell is a rebel. A loner. A maverick cormorant existing on the fringes of cormorant society.

It almost makes me wonder whether it's a real cormorant or not.

I watched it this morning doing laps in a rare blue sky over North Bracknell - and thought to myself...

 

"I wonder. I wonder if that weird cormorant (that doesn't behave like any other cormorant) isn't, in fact, a cormorant at all".

"Perhaps it's some kind of clever drone -put up over North Bracknell each morning to check on the traffic movement or local residents".

"Yeah. Perhaps it's a police cormorant".

 

As I finished my walk, I strolled past Farley Moor Lake

And as I strolled past this lake in North Bracknell... I amazingly saw this cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) actually land on the lake.

So "it can't be a drone can it?" I thought... 

... as a police car drove by me, very slowly, with both police officers inside looking at the part of the lake that the cormorant just landed on.

Hmmmmm…..

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) cormorant https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/12/watching-ones-carbos Wed, 18 Dec 2019 12:47:53 GMT
Did you catch me on LBC Radio yesterday? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/11/did-you-catch-me-on-lbc-radio-yesterday Well?
Did you?

Some chap rang into "Mystery hour" on the James O'Brien LBC radio show to pose the question:

"Why are goldfish so-called, when they're clearly NOT 'gold' coloured, but orange instead".

Now, regular readers of this blog may remember one of my more popular posts from seven years ago now, where I discussed a similar matter.

Anyway... I thought I'd ring the James O'Brien show and give the chap (and the listening nation... all on tenterhooks, I'm sure you can imagine!) the answer, live on air.

What?

You DIDN'T listen to the James O'Brien show on LBC, on Thursday November 7th, between 10am and 1pm?

Well...

Now's your chance.

Download the global player app to your smartphone, or tablet or listen on the webplayer on your desktop.

Go to LBC on the app.

Select Catch-up.

Select the James O'Brien show on LBC, on Thursday November 7th.

Press play.

The show starts with 3 hours left to play.

Fast forward to around 21 minutes left to play (I was introduced just after James says "It's 12:39")

And then enjoy three minutes of yours truly, talking about goldfish, robins, red kites, red-necked phalarope, red foxes, red squirrels, red grouse, the colours yellow, orange, red and gold, the 16th century, Sanskrit and Dravidian roots to words …. and..... Anglo Saxon.

I never got time to mention "red haired" people mind....

TBR.

 

Oh.... by the way... you have until November 14th (6 days as I write) to listen to my dulcet tones on the global player app catch-up of recording of yesterday's James O'Brien show - before the episode disappears into the mists of time, like a glowing-eyed, lolloping black rabbit. Beckonnnning yoooooouuuuu.

RobinRobin

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) colour fame at last gold goldfish james o'brien lbc radio mystery hour orange https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/11/did-you-catch-me-on-lbc-radio-yesterday Fri, 08 Nov 2019 18:53:04 GMT
"The wildlife daddies" - a year on the road. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/11/-the-wildlife-daddies---a-year-on-the-road Seems a bit crass, posting this, after the sad news a week ago, but here it is anyway.

Whilst most people record on their dashcams and then post online all their near-misses in their cars - my eldest boy and I ("The wildlife daddies") use our dashcam on our car we've called "the hearse" (it's a big black 4x4 estate car) to record all the animals we see whilst out on our drives.

The video below is a compilation of thirty-or-so clips of various animals (from barn owls to stoats) that "the wildlife daddies" have seen then, between early October 2018 and early October 2019 - a year on the roads.

You (as viewers) will do well to see all the animals that either I (or my eldest) point out in these clips - the dashcam is a VERY wide angle lens after all, so makes things appear MUCH smaller and further away than they were in real life - not to mention the fact that Youtube has compressed the original HD quality video.

But I hope you enjoy the video anyway and in it, you'll certainly be able to see a lot of the animals that we point out. A hint here.... as soon as the text (naming the animal in the clip) disappears, the animal does too, at the same time - i.e. the animal leaves the frame when the text naming it leaves the frame.

You may even start enjoying the rather eclectic sound track we often have pumping out of the car stereo on these wildlife drives!

More soon,

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl buzzard canada goose dashcam fox great spotted woodpecker green woodpecker little owl mole pheasant rabbit red-legged partridge roe deer stoat tawny owl the wildlife daddies wildlife https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/11/-the-wildlife-daddies---a-year-on-the-road Thu, 07 Nov 2019 16:59:10 GMT
Sad news. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/11/sad-news It is with a heavy heart that I should tell regular followers of this blog that our big male hedgehog who (I think) I first noticed in the garden in mid March this year, has died.

Regular readers of this wildlife blog will know that I try to get our local (garden(s)) population of hedgehogs moving around the 'hood as much as possible and am always digging hedgehog tunnels under our fences and even doors, to get them moving around and breeding.

I was aware that on digging the tunnel under our side passage door (through concrete) I was opening up the hedgehogs' territory to include our road - but that was a risk that I had to take on.

For some weeks now, we have had at least two hedgehogs in our garden, one larger male and one much smaller hedgehog (probably male, but still hard to tell). These two hedgehogs have been using my side passage tunnel each night.

I videoed our larger male hog chewing on my hat the other night.

I then videoed him leaving a food tunnel I'd created primarily for the smaller hedgehog, to fatten it up before any hibernation (see below)

So... the last time I videoed our big male hedgehog was at 2am (I forgot to put the trail cam's clock back in this clip) on the 30th October 2019. This will be my last clip of our big male hedgehog, we have to assume.

 

A few hours later  (about 8am) Anna found the body of this hedgehog fifty yards from our house, on the road - clearly hit by a car.

Very sad news.

I have left reporting this news for a few days, but it would be fair to say now that after a few nights of leaving the trail camera out each night in a vain attempt to keep videoing our bigger hedgehog (a nightly star on the trail camera video clips)… I am convinced that the dead hedgehog outside our house the other morning WAS indeed our large male - as the trail camera has not picked him up once since.

Really sad news.

 

 

Now.

Does this dark cloud have any sort of silver lining?

Well... perhaps.

Firstly, I can't be 100% sure that the hedgehog killed on the road outside our house in the small hours of October 30th IS our large male. I'm almost sure  -  but I can't be 100% sure. My wife and I have got previous here, finding a squashed hedgehog on our road, 100 yards from our house, thinking the worst and then being nicely surprised nine days later.

Secondly - even if was our large male on the road... we still have our small hedgehog each night in our garden - who is eating lots of hedgehog food in the tunnel I've built for it.

Thirdly - even if it was our large male on the road, perhaps the smaller hedgehog that we have visiting is his progeny (it is almost certainly not even one year old - it really is small) - so perhaps he did get to sow his wild oats before he got hit by a car.

All of this is speculation of course... but a small crumb of comfort perhaps.

Sad anyway though....

 

Footnote.

This is now the third hedgehog that has been squashed on our 20MPH speed limit road in the last two years, within 150 yards of our house.

I am still dumbfounded that on a 20MPH road, car drivers can still squash hedgehogs on roads.

Sure, I'm hyper-aware and am always looking some way down the road when I drive anywhere - but I thought other drivers at least tried to do the same. I guess not.

So. A plea then to all motorists out there... please, please try to be a little more engaged in the driving process when you're behind the wheel and try to be a little more aware of things on or by or crossing roads. One could perhaps forgive you for accidentally squashing a frog, or a stag beetle... but not a pint-glass (or bigger!) sized hedgehog.

Because if you don't fully engage in the job of driving well (and NOT hitting and killing things) and you all still continue to insist to brick up your telly-tubby gardens  - well... we will have no hedgehogs left in a couple of decades.

It's incredible to think that when I was a boy in the early eighties, doing my paper-rounds in the dark, I'd always see/hear four or five hedgehogs each night... without even trying - but fast forward a few decades and my sons may well not be able to see ANY soon. Or ever again.

How sad would that be?

Too sad to think too much about, to be honest.

 

Until the next time then.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/11/sad-news Sat, 02 Nov 2019 15:47:27 GMT
You tell me! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/10/you-tell-me

Regular readers of this blog may know that we have two hedgehogs wandering through our side passage each night - a large male and a smaller female.

At this time of year they'll be looking to seriously fatten up before settling down in a suitable hibernaculum for the winter.

But last night our male hedgehog decided to have a right go at my old Bristol University Rugby beanie hat - and I mean a RIGHT go at it!

Have a look at the video below and you tell me what is happening!

 

Is he looking for bedding material for his hibernaculum?

Does he find the smell and taste of my old UBRFC hat irresistible?

And what is all this excessive licking and cleaning about - is he suffering (more than many hedgehogs) from ticks and fleas etc?

Strange days nights...

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bristol university Bristol University Rugby Football Club hedgehog strange UBRFC https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/10/you-tell-me Tue, 29 Oct 2019 11:43:34 GMT
WPOTY. The worst ever? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/10/wpoty-the-worst-ever I know, I know. Six years ago now I moaned about the lack of invertebrates in winning/commended images in the prestigious WPOTY competition, run by the Natural History Museum in London.

That changed pretty quickly when invertebrate categories were included (the organisers of the competition CLEARLY read this blog!) but the following year I was even more damning of the earnest commentary to the winning photo (and not just the overall winner), penned by the photographer(s) himself (themselves). I mean... they called THEIR OWN IMAGE.... "almost biblical". Come off it!

 

Those two years aside, I try NOT to criticise the world's most prestigious wildlife photography competition, as the winning images are invariably breath-taking - and we all (four of us now) do visit the gallery at the NHM each year.

We won't this year though.

Because... and whisper this quietly if you need to... the quality of images that won or were commended are the worst ever. Easily.

I'll run through a few and what I find disappointing with them... but remember this is a subjective critique. You are entitled to disagree in the same way as you have a right to be wrong!

OK?

Ready?

Let's go then.

Prepare to see the world through my eyes...

 

 

The overall winning shot. "The Moment"

Which has been reported the world over as a marmot being "surprised" or "spooked" by a fox.

I look firstly at wildlife photographs as a zoologist or amateur naturalist I suppose. I firstly try and ascertain (if it's not immediately obvious) what it is that I'm looking at, when I look at a successful image in the competition. And THEN I look at the artistic merit of the image.

And I'm BORED stiff of photographers (not videographers - you'll see why in a moment) ascribing human qualities/emotions/behaviours to their wildlife photograph - capturing a millisecond of action and then basically MAKING UP what the result of that image depicted.

Many people I know (who are admittedly less "into" wildlife than I am) will, if asked to say what was going on in the winning photograph, would agree with the hacks who have said "the groundhog/marmot/lemming/whatever it is.... is indeed being shocked/surprised/spooked by the fox/wolf/whatever it is".

Even the photographer said so. "This Himalayan marmot was not long out of hibernation when it was surprised by a mother Tibetan fox."

The image does seem to depict a surprised marmot.

But it isn't an image of a shocked/spooked/surprised marmot is it?

No. No it isn't.

It really isn't you know.

If it WAS a photo of a spooked marmot, the fox would be in the air, millimetres from the marmot with its own teeth bared.

But the fox isn't in that position at all!

No....what the image actually shows is a snap shot of a marmot FIGHTING FOR ITS LIFE. With mouth open wide either as a result of barking in pure fear/aggression/defence at the fox and or sheer muscular effort at the need to act IMMEDIATELY and with SPEED... just to survive.

The fox is the giveaway in this.

The female fox is not jumping on the marmot or even heading in its direction, even though it is almost on top of the marmot.

It has BEEN SEEN. And It KNOWS IT. It is now either circling 'round or backing off. The game is up. 

If you look at the image that way (the way I describe, the CORRECT way), you'll see the marmot isn't at this moment, "surprised".

It's MID FIGHT (and probably, shortly, flight).

The photographer doesn't tell us what happened to the marmot. Or the fox.

My mortage goes on the fact that THIS marmot got away. Purely because it WASN'T "surprised".

 

 

Now.

"A Taste of Peace" by Charlie Hamilton James.

Look, perhaps I've never forgiven Charlie for marrying one of my childhood sweethearts (Philippa Forrester) but I ask you... do YOU think  this image merits a commendation in the competition? It's a messy jungle with part of an elephant in the background. I look at it atnd I think... "meh".

The image itself, or rather the title of the image itself, only really makes sense when you read Charlie's accompanying explanatory notes.  I'd suggest that if you need to read the notes to "get the image" (and even then I don't think the image is at all interesting to be honest), it should go on the "meh" pile of submitted images, rather than the "shortlisted" pile.  

 

Another?

"Little Leapers".

A lovely image you'd perhaps at first, think.

Until I tell you that you might like to read the photographer's notes again and realise (as I suspected from a quick glance at the tarsiers) that the photographer basically shone an LED torch at these VERY nocturnal mammals, to get his image. That sort of thing makes me very uncomfortable. Nocturnal animals have eyes that really shouldn't have torches shone into them - something that British wildlife photographers might like to remember when they take their cutesy photographs of hedgehogs/foxes etc.

 

More?

OK then... two together.

The Personality category is always a little fraught for me. What do you mean by "personality"?

Do albatrosses have "personalities"? Or Pike. Or Nudibranchs?

Now, even though I'm ALL FOR invertebrates doing well in these competitions, SPIDERS simply don't have "personality"... so you can rule out this photo and this one too, from what I think is even apt in this category. Technically-superb shots for sure, (even if I've been taking similar types of images for a decade or more now) but these shots do not depict "personality". At least not in my view.

 

One more?

Oh go on then.

"Dinner Duty".

Your turn.

You tell ME what's so terribly wrong with this image.

(Answer at the end of this blog post!)*

 

 

Like I say, I try not to write about wildlife photography competitions on this blog, or if I do, I wax lyrical about some of the wonderful winning images that I picked out as my favourites. This year though, I have no favourites. I'm genuinely disappointed by most of the images.

That all said, I do want to find a thin silver lining to this particular gurt big black cloud.

For me, the inclusion of images of predators actually eating their prey ALIVE is something to be celebrated.

When I entered my (now infamous) photo of a cat eating a nestling, it was met with shock - across the board. It was no pretty image. It was awful to be honest... but you HAD TO LOOK AT IT. You couldn't NOT look at it. It (I'll blow my own trumpet here) had a remarkable power that image - although at the time I certainly didn't include that notion in my accompanying notes. And nor did I call it biblical!!! I was also told by very experienced wildlife photographers at the award ceremony that they loved that photo as it proved that a photo of something eating something else COULD do well in a competition - rather than just turn the judges and public off.

So I'm really pleased that THIS image "A bite to eat" did so well... and yes, I guess this IS my favourite image of this year's winners.

 

That's that then.

My thoughts on this year's 2019 WPOTY.

 

 

Oh.

Nearly forgot.

*What's wrong with the winning (or highly commended) photo of the great grey owls?

Got it?

No?

I'll tell you then....

The adult owl on the right has the end of its tail out of shot (whether it was never included or cropped out - it's unforgiveable).

Now I'm all for breaking the rules of photography. The golden ratio. Empty space. The rule of thirds etc.

But that, laydeez and gennelmen, is your basic CRIME against photography, so it is.

It's like a wedding photographer taking a group shot... but cutting off everyone's feet.

You just wouldn't pay them, would you? Let alone give them a prize!

 

TBR.

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) 2019 natural history museum nhm wildlife photographer of the year wpoty https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/10/wpoty-the-worst-ever Tue, 22 Oct 2019 14:16:03 GMT
A quick SITREP https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/9/a-quick-sitrep Yes... I know... I've been AWOL for almost exactly a month now, but... well... I've been busy, eh?

Work has been silly.

We're all a bit exhausted here to be honest - dodgy tummies and ulcerated throats, headaches etc. All due (I'm sure) to sleepless nights thanks at least in part to our 7 month old boy. So nothing serious but exhausting nonetheless.

My boys have been keeping me busy.

I've now agreed to help coach the U7s at the local rugby club.

I've been busy going to rugby matches and golf tournaments...

AND the rugby world cup is on.

Oh yes... and BBC Parliament is avid viewing these days too (who'd have thunk that four years ago?).

 

So... Anyway... I thought I'd just drop by to say "hello" and to let you know I'm still here, sometimes... and then I'll booger off again for a week or so I expect.

 

What's been happening then, wildlife-wise, over the last month? I'll bullet the main points for as much brevity as I can now muster...

  • We've had a pretty dry month (very dry  indeed bone dry to be honest) until the last day or two.
  • Ivy bees have started to feed on our large, dead, ivy-clad damson tree.
  • The leaves have started to yellow and drop - I'll need to net the pond by October 1st.
  • "Our" jackdaws have found our jay feeder (I resurrected it at the end of August after I knew the swifts had gone).
  • But "our" jays have NOT returned yet to find my jay feeder. (I only have it up between September and March each year).
  • I'm still seeing the odd wee flock of swallows and house martins moving south.
  • I haven't heard my first redwing yet (surely only a week or two now).
  • I was the only one (I'm sure) of several thousand rugby fans to see the Kingfisher fishing on the river Crane in Twickenham as we all trooped from the station to The Stoop to see my beloved Bristol Bears play Harlequins t'other night.
  • For the first year in a few now, I've NOT found a hawkmoth or pussmoth caterpillar in our garden, so I could raise it over the winter.
  • Foxes are still nightly visitors to our back garden despite are most northerly (of four neighbours) bulldozing all the overgrown area at the back of the garden bordering ours, where I thiiiink the foxes denned in the Spring.
  • My eldest boy and I have been on a few wildlife drives during the day (not at our preferred night time) and seen our local barn owl and a few pheasants plus a dead mole... but that's about it really.
  • Finally.... we have TWO hedgehogs (I say two... there are AT LEAST two but there could possibly (I doubt it) be three) visiting our garden each night... and I'm proud to say, using my concrete hedgehog tunnel under our side passage door each night.

 

Regarding our hedgehogs, you'll see from the first video clip below that our biggest flea-ridden, spiky friend is most certainly a male. A well-endowed male at that... and I think this is our original hedgehog.

The second video clip below shows our second hedgehog. Much smaller and much faster than the hedgehog above. This small hedgehog is NOT obviously a male or a female (in that I've not managed to get a gander at its genitals yet... ohhh my wife is a lucky so-and-so isn't she). This hedgehog, although smaller than the one in the clip above, has been MUCH smaller - I almost wonder if its not even one year old yet. I guess I'll never know.

And my final wee video clip from a few nights ago now, shows BOTH our two (I'm almost positive we only have two, not three) hedgehogs in our side pssage together. You'll note, I'm sure, when watching the clip, that the bigger hedgehog is nearest the camera, and is going about its own business when the smaller hedgehog walks into shot in the background and freezes on hearing a nearby hedgehog. All this means is that these two hedgehogs are not a pair. They undoubtedly will "know" of each other's presence in the territory from scent if nothing else - and I'm sure they'll regularly come across each other on their nightly wanderings. But to repeat, whilst it's obvious that the bigger hedgehog is male, I have no idea about the smaller hedgehog (it could be male or female... or even perhaps trans?).

On that last point, whilst it's tempting for enthusiastic wildlife reporters/bloggers to ascribe sex (in terms of gender!) to their regular garden visitors (foxes, hedgehogs, mice, squirrels etc)  unless its obvious (chronically-visible suckled teats on foxes or squirrels, a visible penis on a hedgehog) it is probably best not to guess. Invariably you'll be wrong!

 

OK.

That shallot for now, grapple fans.

I hope, like me, you're enjoying the Rugby World Cup and I hope like me you're getting over the fact that summer, once more, is no more this year.

More soon.

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl hedgehog house martin mole pheasant swallow https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/9/a-quick-sitrep Thu, 26 Sep 2019 16:39:01 GMT
"Operation Yellowhammer". https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/-operation-yellowhammer You'll remember the Whitehall dossier which was written a year ago and leaked a couple of weeks ago - detailing warnings of food, medicine and fuel if a "no deal Brexit" came to be... yes?

You may remember also that the dossier's name of "Yellowhammer" was (allegedly) a random choice.

So...

Is it only me that thinks that the name "yellowhammer" fits this dossier PERFECTLY?

I don't think it was named randomly at all.

I think the choice of that name was spot on.

 

Permit me to explain...

 

Look, I had my nose in bird books for a lot of my youth... and if you're my sort of age (middle-aged) and were as into wildlife and birds as I was/am - then you'll remember, like me, I'm sure that bird calls were written as English phrases in some identification books, so if you heard them in the field (but didn't see them) you'd KNOW what bird was making that call.

One example might be:

"TEACHER! TEACHER! TEACHER! TEACHER! TEACHER!" (The call of a great tit).

 

Another example might be:

"Di-vorce. Him. Di-vorce. Him". (the call of a collared dove).

 

But the most famous example of all was:

"A little bit of bread and NO cheese". (the call of a yellowhammer).

 

Now ... if "a little bit of bread and NO cheese" isn't a perfect one line description of post no-deal Brexit food shortages, I don't know what is.

 

 

 

 

 

Finally.

You probably have done so already, but if you've not...
Please, today, sign the petition to stop Boris Johnson proroguing Parliament.
The petition can be found here:  https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/269157

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) yellowhammer https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/-operation-yellowhammer Wed, 28 Aug 2019 14:42:06 GMT
"The octopus in my house". Sublime television. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/-the-octopus-in-my-house-sublime-television Look... we all LOVE wildlife programmes on TV don't we.... and sublimely-shot natural history programmes are almost expected these days, on our gurt-big plasma screens eh?

But it's actually quite a rare thing to watch a scintillating natural history TV programme which relies not on beautiful HD and or slow motion shots of wildebeest cavorting the raging Zambezi etc etc but instead the human-animal relationship, interaction and to some extent, eccentric devotion.

One of my favourite EVER natural history programmes which did just that (the above) was a programme aired about 8 years ago, entitled "My life as a turkey". It was a BBC2 Natural World programme and if you haven't seen it... I urge you to find a way to.

Eight years on and I was slumped on the sofa last night and decided (last minute) to watch "The Octopus in my house" - another BBC2 Natural World (I think) programme. I'm HUGELY glad I did.

Now I may have a very soft (indeed) spot for cephalopods, (I'll blog about my encounter with a cuttlefish in the Med when I get a chance) so yes, I may be biased - but if you've not watched this programme last night - again... I urge you to find a way to. You'll not regret it. I promise. 

The only downside may be that you may take octopus (and calamari more widely) off your meal choices in future.

Anyway... please watch it if you can.

TBR.

 

(The shot below of course was taken by me, on holiday in the Maldives, about ten years ago, and shows a wild, adult cuttlefish sitting in the crystal clear waters of the Indian Ocean right by our seaplane pontoon).

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) BBC2 Natural World octopus The octopus in my house TV https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/-the-octopus-in-my-house-sublime-television Fri, 23 Aug 2019 08:15:56 GMT
Swifts - It's not just the hope that hurts... it really IS the despair too. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/swifts---its-not-just-the-hope-that-hurts-it-s-the-loss-too After last season, I was really hoping that 2019 would finally bring back my favourite bird of all to actually NEST with us again - 8 years after filming them in our old place, "Swift Half", in Reading.

SwiftSwift

But last year was a different kettle of fish, weather wise , at least here. (Well... it was unlikely to be the same as last year's prolonged heatwave eh?).

That said, this year, the weather in the Med at migration time was quite similar to last year - and when I say quite similar, I mean much worse than normal, with storms and cool temperatures. Last year that unseasonable weather lasted a few days.... this year, unfortunately it lasted a couple of weeks or more and there were many reports of dead and dying swifts all over the Med - dying as they attempted their annual northerly migration. Some of those unfortunate swifts could have been ours. By that I mean the young birds that explored our attic last year. The birds that I hoped might return to nest with us this year. A horrible, horrible thought.

Again, you may remember that last year I wrote about this and wondered if it would be a blip last year or a sign of things to come - has climate change already made this "unseasonable" weather in the Spring in the Med, quite normal? Well... two years on the trot is still a blip at present... but if we get  more years like this in the next few... then I'm afraid to say that it may be the case that we may have to get used to not seeing swifts in any numbers at all in our British skies in a couple of decades or less.

I know.

A dreadful thought.

But look... if we continue to blast all insects with pesticides and tidy up our soffits and fascias… we give swifts no food and no shelter. And that's IF they get over here at all, after we've buggered up the climate, meaning that their ancient window of migration north to breed, in late April... is blocked by low temperatures and storms.

This year though, despite what Nick Brown absolutely incorrectly says in this piece, we had a warm, reasonably-SETTLED May here and a reasonable June too... albeit worse than last year's scorcher)

We've just got to hope that last year and this was a blip - in terms of poor weather in the Med JUST when the swifts migrate north.

 

And as for the new "Swift Half" here. Well... I fear it may be back to square one. It's taken me 7 years to get swifts to explore our attic boxes last year - and we had NO swifts explore our boxes this year. NONE.

Oh sure... we had regular swifty fly-bys in the last three months and each fly-by was announced by the familiar scream - and they DID seem to be screaming at our house (and Mp4 call!). They were here most days (dawns and dusks)… it's just that NONE banged on our roof... and they've been doing that for at least four years and exploring the attic for the last season.

 

I occasionally see a swift high in the sky over the house in early September, moving south - but if I see no more this year, then the last I saw im 2019 was a week ago - at dusk, giving the house a fly by again.

I'll try to be positive now, at my LEAST favourite time of the year, when my swifts disappear... but this year in particular, it won't be easy.

We've lost HALF our breeding swifts in the last decade or so.

Last year was quite poor across the country (admittedly not here at "Swift Half") and this year has been REALLY poor - and the worst year ever here at the new "Swift Half".

Graph below courtesy of Bird Track and the BTO.

Last year provided me with a gurt big steaming ladle of hope (see photo below).

But this year.... well....

 

We'll just have to try and save some of that hope, if any's left.  We can't lose hope! This is too important!

May 2020 isn't that long away....

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Apus apus swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/swifts---its-not-just-the-hope-that-hurts-it-s-the-loss-too Thu, 22 Aug 2019 06:30:00 GMT
Bird Photographer Of The Year 2019 https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/bird-photographer-of-the-year-2019 A quick post this morning - and a nice, upbeat post... before I drag you through the pits of despair later in the week I'm afraid, when I blog about this season's swifts.

That post (coming) won't be a pretty picture... unlike some of the photos below...

This week saw the winners of the BPOTY (Bird Photographer Of The Year (2019)) competition announced.

Most of the photos are superb... just superb, including the overall winner.

Have a look at the winners yourselves here... and also have a look at some of my favourites on that website and below.

Wonderful stuff....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) BPOTY https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/bird-photographer-of-the-year-2019 Tue, 20 Aug 2019 07:30:00 GMT
What I did with (the rest of) my summer holidays. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/what-i-did-with-the-rest-of-my-summer-holidays  

We didn't go away this year, but instead took two weeks of day trips to places less than an hour and a bit away (or so) in "the hearse".

Highlights included The Lookout Centre, Swinley Forest, Blackbushe Airport, Marwell Zoo, Beale Park, Bucklebury Farm, The Hawk Conservancy , The British Wildlife Centre and Bird World.

I've already posted a fair few photos here , here , here and here... but below are some more photos with brief captions visible (I hope) if you hover your cursor over an image...

Our youngest boy looking (dare I say it) very photogenic indeed in this shot.

Red Squirrel at The British Wildlife Centre

Another red squirrel at the British Wildlife Centre

Our eldest boy getting close and personal to his favourite British mammal (we took him to see real WILD ones at the Isle of Wight last year) at the British Wildlife Centre

An otter at The British Wildlife Centre

Our eldest boy watching his mummy's favourite wild British mammal at the British Wildlife Centre, near Lingfield in Kent.

My favourite wild British mammal - at the British Wildlife Centre

Barn owl flying at BirdWorld, Hants.

Our eldest boy's favourite wild British bird, a barn owl, flying at BirdWorld, Hants.

Our eldest boy's favourite wild British bird, a barn owl, at BirdWorld, Hants.

A wonderful (laughing) Kookaburra flying at BirdWorld, Hants.

A (pretty beat-up) male black-tailed skimmer dragonfly at Beale Park

A nest of swallows at Bucklebury farm park. One of about 15 nests we think.

A HUGE female sparrowhawk in our garden in a rainstorm.

The eastern sky above our garden at midnight on the night of peak Perseid activity. I saw two lovely meteors but didn't get any on "film" this year.

Hartslock nature reserve, a photo taken from Beale Park. Hartslock Nature reserve is one of two (only two!) public sites in the entire UK where one can find monkey orchids in late May or early June.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) beale park bird world blackbushe airport bucklebury farm marwell zoo swinley forest the british wildlife centre the hawk conservancy the lookout centre https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/what-i-did-with-the-rest-of-my-summer-holidays Mon, 19 Aug 2019 13:29:48 GMT
The Hawk Conservancy https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/vultures-watching-vultures Yesterday, I took my wife and two boys to a place I've been visiting every few years for the past thirty-five years... The (wonderful) "Hawk Conservancy" near Weyhill, Andover, Hants.

Unlike London (or Marwell for that matter) zoos, I always voluntarily donate to The Hawk Conservancy when I visit - as I think it does quite superb work on behalf of raptor conservation worldwide.

Below are a few photos I took during our time there yesterday (the last photo being included on my eldest son's insistence - and yes after yesterday he STILL has the barn owl as his favourite bird) - and honestly, if you've never been... do yersels a favour and go. I promise you won't regret it.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) The Hawk Conservancy https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/vultures-watching-vultures Thu, 15 Aug 2019 19:51:34 GMT
I see grayling. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/i-see-grayling

We (me, my wife and two boys) took a wee walk through Swinley Forest and Caesar's camp t'other day, as the heathers (bell and ling 'round here) both tend to look pretty good in August  - and anyway, I do LOVE my lowland heathland

Not often do I see grayling at all, let alone away from the coast...

 

but I managed to spy one sunbathing on a path through the forest (ACTUAL path in the photo below).

The grayling is a bit of a success in the local forest - as you can read here. (Although I think I saw them in this part of the world before that particular report was penned - but then again I have RIDICULOUS eyes so would back myself to notice these things before many lepidopterists might and journalists certainly would). Nationally I hear this butterfly's population has declined by almost two thirds in the last decade or so.

Graylings (Hipparchia semele - named after a mistress of Zeus) can be difficult to see anyway sometimes, as they tend to sunbathe with their wings closed (NOT showing their "eye" patterns on their forewings) and therefore blend in to patches of bare earth. That said, if you DO manage to spot one, as I did, it often will allow you to get quite close, so confident will it be in its camouflage cloak. As long as you don't cast your shadow over it, mind.

Lovely to see though, as was the heather and views and walk itself (some more photos of the forest below).

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) butterfly grayling hipparchia semele swinley forest https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/i-see-grayling Wed, 14 Aug 2019 15:37:14 GMT
BBC1 https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/bbc1 The more zoologically-knowledgeable among you will know my photo below is of a Broad Bodied Chaser. (Just the one).

Spotted by my eagle-eyed elder son.

Takes after his old man then....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) broad bodied chaser https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/bbc1 Wed, 07 Aug 2019 18:19:52 GMT
What I did (so far) on my summer holidays... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/what-i-did-so-far-on-my-summer-holidays Due to the fact that we have a 6+ month old baby in tow as well as a six year old and three cats to look after at home, we have decided to keep to mainland UK for our annual fortnight holiday this year, or, to be more specific, to be based at home and take day trips to various places within a short drive from the hyse.

These places should (already have, in some cases) include zoos, nature reserves, pubs, rivers, canals, woods and heaths, farms, dinosaur golfing, foot golf, boating, cinemas, a big city or two and various tourist attractions. Oh... and more pubs.

I've set our eldest boy the challenge to find animals during this fortnight that begin with every letter of the alphabet apart from 'X'. I'd prefer wild British animals to populate this list but it would be fair to say that going to the zoo helped with this list yesterday ("Zebra"). Then again, he is hugely helped by the fact that his father can literally take him to see a badger or a barn owl or a buzzard and even if he couldn't, his father could tell him that the beetle that he found isn't just a beetle, but a "bloody nosed beetle" or a "blister beetle" or a "brassy willow beetle" (or for that matter a "blue willow beetle"!).

Anyway... below are a few shots I've taken on our trips over the last few days...

I think the boys are having fun.  What  kid DOESN'T like bugs and creepy-crawlies and lions and tigers and tropical butterflies and leaf cutter bees and barn owls and foxes and rabbits and stoats and red kites and spiders and bats and eagles and piranha fish after all?

Animal highlights so far have included the ostrich below (at the zoo of course, although lovely to see her on an egg), bloody-nosed beetle (photo below too), emperor dragonfly (Yes... "E" for Emperor dragonfly - my zoological mind won't allow any child of mine to just call it "D" for dragonfly I'm afraid), leopard (zoo also of course), tiger (ditto) and the omnipresent (currently) cinnabar moth caterpillars in our local meadows (photos below again).

All this and our fortnight together is only two days old so far! 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) animal alphabet challenge summer holiday https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/what-i-did-so-far-on-my-summer-holidays Tue, 06 Aug 2019 18:15:27 GMT
Puttock augmentation. Today marks the 30 year anniversary. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/puttock-augmentation-today-marks-the-30-year-anniversary I first blogged about this in April.

But today EXACTLY marks the day, thirty years ago now, on 1st August 1989, when five Spanish red kites were reintroduced to the leafy southern Chiltern escarpment.

This day, August 1st, thirty years ago, kick-started a remarkably-successful reintroduction programme up the spine of England and in Scotland too.

Thirty years of bird. Never stopped me dreaming.

KitesKites

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) red kite https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/8/puttock-augmentation-today-marks-the-30-year-anniversary Thu, 01 Aug 2019 09:36:30 GMT
Brown hawker - two close-up photographs https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/brown-hawker---two-close-up-photographs

The beautiful (but dying) male brown hawker dragonfly that moy woyf and boy brought in off the road for me to identify yesterday sadly died overnight, outside on the sunflower stem.

So I thought I'd bring it in and take two more close-up photos of this beastie, before lobbing it onto the compost heap and thus returning it to the earth. Maybe in fact, I should lob it back into the pond - at least then it'd be returning to its home of a couple of years, before it grew wings and terrorised the skies above the pond.

Not the best photos I've ever taken (taken in a hurry with my old bridge camera) but at least you can see the bronze hue to the wings now (this is the colour that gives this dragonfly its "brown" name, even if I think "bronze" might be better) and the blue in its eyes.

A lovely wee beastie, now being taken apart (I expect) by ants in the garden.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) Aeshna grandis brown hawker dragonfly https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/brown-hawker---two-close-up-photographs Tue, 30 Jul 2019 13:37:14 GMT
A bit of a waist? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/a-bit-of-a-waist After my eldest son insisted, my wife brought in (from the road) a beaten up dragonfly for me to identify, this morning.

A lovely brown hawker, so it was.

And a male, to boot.  (I think the best way to differentiate between male and female brown hawkers is to look at the abdomen, and if there's a noticeable waist (a wasp like constriction), it's a male you're looking at... (and if there isn't a "waist".... yes.... it's a female).

Poor thing looked a bit knackered by the state of its frayed wings. I hope it had a chance to find a mate in the last month, or its brief adult life would have been a bit of a waste (or waist in this case of this male) to be frank.

 

I popped it on our sunflower stems, took a few photos... and waited for it to either fly away, or a bird to find it.

Probably the latter to be honest though.

Anyway... a lovely thing to see this morning. These bronze-winged dragonflies surrre are purty.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) aeshna grandis brown hawker dragonfly https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/a-bit-of-a-waist Mon, 29 Jul 2019 11:09:40 GMT
What is YOUR first thought on seeing this image? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/what-is-your-first-thought-on-seeing-this-image

Be honest now and please quickly answer (without thinking too much)… this question.

What's your first thought on seeing the image above:

a) What a lovely owl.

b) What a lovely owl in a lovely field of what? Bluebells? That's a great photo! Superb!

c) What a pretty picture! I love it!

d) What a marvellous photo. How on earth did the photographer get this photo? Stunning job!

e) Oooh! I bet that owl has just caught something, as it's on the ground. Great shot!

 

Or.

 

Like me.

 

Was your first thought on seeing the image above...

1) That's a nocturnal (black rather than orange or yellow-eyed) tawny owl, photographed from a perfect viewpoint (blurred blue of bluebells creating an aesthetically-pleasing soft blur of colour to the bird portrait) at a time of day (the tawny owl is STRICTLY nocturnal) when it should be asleep in a hole in a tree in a perfectly-lit colourful habitat in April or May (flowering bluebells) when it should almost CERTAINLY be hidden in a hole in a tree because it would probably be at the end of its breeding season - and pretty knackered to boot. Not only that but the owl is looking up into a milky sun (partially covered with a decent layer of cloud). You can see that reflected in the owl's black eyes.

In short... this is clearly an image of a kept bird (in this case a tawny owl) at a photography day or event or workshop in the UK (bluebells).

Which is fine. I suppose. Although a little problematic for me, if I'm honest.

Firstly it has been entered and shortlisted in the annual SIWNP (Society of International Wildlife and Nature Photographers) Bird Photographer of the Year 2019 competition.

And that's fine too. Sort of. In this case, in this competition at least.

The rules of the "SIWNP" competitions can be seen below and, unlike the more famous NHM Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition and The British Wildlife Photography Awards rules (also below), there is no ban on entering photographs of animal models in the SIWNP competitions. And that is exactly what this owl is - an animal model.

I'm glad that the more acclaimed NHM wildlife photographer of the year competition (the gold standard and benchmark for true wildlife photographers out there) and to a lesser extent the BWP Awards stipulate that no animal model photographs can be entered. (Although famously, the BWPA awarded a prize or two to the photographer of a captive fox once, a keeper at I think the British Wildlife Centre in Kent).

And yes, the BWPA has had its detractors over the years for seeming to be pretty clearly biased (in terms of awarding prizes to images) towards known and or professional photographers' entries (not anonymous entries) over and above equally (or more in some cases) competent amateur or unknown photographers' entries, but at least it seems to value its integrity as a WILDLIFE photography competition rather than a money-making-machine for the RSPB amongst others, like the SIWNP competition.

A glance at the entries in this year's 2019 SIWNP bird photography competition demonstrates that many of the entries are of captive birds. A shame I think.

The very prestigious International Bird Photographer of the Year Competition (BPOTY)  (certainly far more prestigious than the SIWNP) stipulates (see below) that if you are to submit entries of captive birds, then you should at least admit that.

OK. 
 

So at least the photographer of the owl in the bluebells shot has entered it into the correct competition. The "wildlife" photography competition that DOES accept photos of captive birds and trained birds and model birds.

So why is it slightly problematic for me?

Well.... for a number of reasons, I think.

1  - I'm really not sure a nocturnal owl should be trained to fly during the day and pose for paying photographers. There is a REASON why the tawny owl has big, inky pupils (black eyes, rather than yellow/orange eyes). The same goes for many other nocturnal birds/animals. Each time I see a photo of a nocturnal animal in the day, my first thought often is either a) The poor thing is ill/stressed or b) The poor thing is kept/trained.

2 - If you bill yourself as a "wildlife" photography competition, then I think you should be obliged to only accept photographs of wild animals. Not images of kept animals and birds on photography days that are designed to make the final image look as natural (and wild) as possible.

3 - Many (most?) people, if they're honest, would have firstly, simply thought "what a lovely photograph of an owl in bluebells" when looking at the first photo of this blog post. These people might then come to my (or many others') websites and think... " Well... these images are OK, but NOTHING compared to that lovely bluebell owl photo that I saw the other day and I think should WIN the wildlife photography competition it's been entered into". That is to say that false expectations are put onto the whole field of wildlife photography, with "wildlife" photographs like this.   This is the entire reason that I write "All my wildlife (fauna) images on this website are of truly wild animals - not captive or tame animals." on my about page, on this website.

4 - Linked to 3, above. The majority of the wildlife photographer's skill comes BEFORE the shot is taken. Learning about the animal's behaviour and habitat. Getting close to the animal, whilst respecting the animal's welfare and of course the law. FIELDCRAFT. All this takes real effort. Time. Patience. YEARS of work. And it's a real skill. Rocking up to a bluebell field with a van full of owls hugely detracts from that - and the end result is DESIGNED to do that.


I've visited the photographer's (who took the owl and bluebell shot) website

and at least he's generally honest about his photography workshops. Most (almost all it seems) of his bird of prey photographs were taken on photography days, with trained birds. He's been honest about this most of the time, explaining that he even cropped out jesses and falconry paraphernalia to make the birds look more natural or wild). Hell or Heck (as Americans might say) he's even uploaded a photograph OF an (owl) photography workshop, in Slovakia I think, onto his website.

 

But as I've explained (at length, sorry!) above, I'm just a bit, more than a bit to be honest, uncomfortable with this method of taking "wildlife" photographs and then entering them into "wildlife" photography competitions. Frankly I think it's a con and a cheat and damaging to working, REAL wildlife photographers... and although this particular photographer is relatively honest about his methods (if you look at the "story" details of his images), many, MANY others aren't.

A trained, or kept, or even (semi) domesticated animal doesn't mean "wildlife" to me.

And the trouble is, for me, once I see that several dozen or several hundred even of your thousand images of "wildlife" on your website are of "kept animals" (even though that might not be clear nor even admitted), then I'm not sure that I can believe that any of your "wildlife" shots are truly of wild animals. Animals that you got the shot of thanks to your fieldcraft and skill and time and effort, rather than a hundred quid and an hour in a car.

 

OK.

That's all for now, grapple fans.

I'll leave you with a few (a lot) more photographs from this photographer's generic website and after each one (or set) I'll give you a line or two of my immediate thoughts if I was to see these entered into any future "wildlife" photography competition.

I hope that these immediate thoughts of mine may make you think differently about certain "wildlife" photographs when you see them in the future. I really do. OK... don't think badly of ALL "wildlife" photographs - there are many stunning (and REAL) photographs out there... just be a little more critical towards some (staged) photographs than you may be currently.

 

Have a lovely weekend.

TBR.

 

Above, four photos. Same bird (female kestrel) taken at same photogenic spot, from different angles, relatively close-up, in the right month of the year (almost certainly August), with the legs of the bird hidden (and therefore any jesses too). Workshop photo (as thankfully the photographer does state if you click these images on his website and read the story behind the image).

 

 

Above. Wow. The photographer got a photo of a woodland specialist (goshawk) on a pheasant in the same heather field as the kestrel shots above, in the same month!  This (already dead) pheasant is bait therefore, and the (red-ring on leg) hawk is kept. (Again I think the photographer was at least semi-transparent about this shot).

 

Above. Righto. A buzzard now too. This is a van full of birds isn't it? 

 

Above. This fly shows that this is a long-dead mouse, a (frozen) 'pinky' as falconers call it, being fed to a captive bird (barn owl).

 

 

Finally, above, a nocturnal (tawny) owl perfectly-posed in SUNLIGHT by a perfectly-still pond, at the perfect, colourful time of year (orange autumn foliage) means this is a staged shot, at a workshop, where I'd suggest the welfare of the owl is not being prioritised.

 

+++

 

Footnote. 

Just in case there's any confusion here, all the photographs of birds on this post are copyright this particular photographer (who I'll not name here - that name is easily found online). This chap is at least generally honest about the photography workshops he attends. Most (almost all it seems) of his bird of prey photographs were taken on photography days, with trained birds. He's been honest about this most of the time, explaining that he even cropped out jesses and falconry paraphernalia to make the birds look more natural or wild. 

Many others aren't that honest though. 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) widlife photography https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/what-is-your-first-thought-on-seeing-this-image Sun, 28 Jul 2019 08:46:15 GMT
Absolutely ANYTHING.... for the shot. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/absolutely-anything-for-the-shot I'm going to begin this short(ish) blog post with a request... please visit THIS link and read the entire piece in that link. 

(The link will take you to the Petapixel website, and a piece bemoaning the utter lack of respect or thought or consideration of the modern "photographer", in their singular, blinkered quest to get their shot, at all costs, in this instance at the famous lavender fields of the plateau of Valensole, in  Provence).

If you're not a photographer... let's clarify that as these days, EVERYONE takes photos.... if you don't think of yourself as or call yourself a photographer or at least, like me, own one or two semi-professional or "prosumer" DSLRS (or the mirrorless equivalent now) then that piece in Petapixel will, or should open your eyes very wide, to the state of play these days at photography "honeypots" around the world.

And if you ARE a photographer (or tick one or more of the boxes that I mention above (I don't intend to again)) you may have already read the piece about Valensole, and sigh as you're again reminded of what occurs at many photogenic viewpoints across the globe.

Everyone had to get their shot these days. 

No matter what.

And then immediately upload to social media.

And that is just ONE of the reasons I've pretty well abandoned ALL (facebook and twitter) social media over the last few years including now Instagram, a website (or social media site) which I believe has pretty-well KILLED photography.

 

As a nascent wildlife photographer ohhhh maybe nine or ten years ago now, I came across this sort of behaviour in "wildlife photography" circles, where it was reported (it didn't need to be) that award-winning photographers were getting their (fast-becoming-standard) shots of seals on colony beaches such as Donna Nook in Lincolnshire, by trespassing and disturbing the seals. ANYTHING for their shot.

Likewise, when, about six years ago, I naively showed a fellow (I thought), local owl 'appreciator', the exact tree location of our local barn owls, on the strict promise that he would show no-one else, and happening across him and one of his "twitcher" friends at the owl's tree not a week later, all trying to get their cameras INTO the tree. I explained to them both there and then, that if I ever saw either of them anywhere NEAR this tree again, I'd take their cameras and... well... I'll draw a veil over the rest of my diatribe there, dear reader. (I've not seen anyone there since... and my long suffering wife isn't too surprised!).

 

It's sad, isn't it?

This, ANYTHING for the shot, mentality.

ANYTHING goes.

 

And I'm afraid to say, dear reader.... it's an attitude which is growing exponentially.

Google image "Valensole" and see what you are confronted with!

And please, DO read that quite excellent Petapixel piece.  One of the best insights into this modern malaise I've ever read.

 

Stay cool.

TBR.

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) photography https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/absolutely-anything-for-the-shot Wed, 24 Jul 2019 16:38:23 GMT
Ten years.... but maybe now... thistle be the year? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/ten-years-but-maybe-now-thistle-be-the-year What do you remember of the summer of 2009?

Me?

Well... I had been married for almost a year and my wife and I were at that time without children and that summer moved into a rented house in south Reading, a house we called "Swift Half", on account of the swifts nesting there (which in 2010 and 2011 I filmed).

I also remember a huge influx (or "irruption" (no... not an "eruption", an "irruption", like an implosion rather than an explosion)) of great numbers of the very pretty "Painted lady" butterflies.

I was doing a lot of "work" in our new, rented garden all summer - improving the land for wildlife etc, and I remember LOADS of painted lady butterflies that summer.

Both the photos below were taken by me during that summer, on our garden path, with my first bridge camera  - a Panasonic FZ20. I was just getting into (insect) photography at the time and looking at the photo directly below this sentence, might I say, rather successfully too!

 

Painted Ladies have the scientific name of Vanessa cardui (literally meaning lit-up like a torch (Vanessa), of the thistles (cardui)). Well... Painted ladies ARE almost iridescent in certain light (and therefore 'shining') and one of their favourite food plants IS indeed nectar from the carduus (thistles) genus of plants, so I guess that sort-of fits. Another "Vanessa" butterfly, the Red Admiral, has a much more romantic scientific name though. Click here to read about that!

Anyway, so impressed was I by these stunning butterflies, that I vowed that when I bought my own (our own) house, which we did two years later, in the summer of 2011, I'd plant plants specifically for butterflies and moths, (plants such as red valerian, buddleia etc) and leave wild areas of any garden we had bought for nettles and thistles to grow (nettles for the small tortoiseshells and thistles for the painted ladies).

Like I said, in 2011 we bought our current "Swift Half" house, complete with the biggest garden we could afford (for my hens as well as my wildlifey-wellbeing) and I set about planting red valerian and buddleia and leaving thistles to grow etc.

Don't get me wrong - we've done marvels for wildlife in our garden and all our efforts have resulted in lots of lovely lepidoptera - including hummingbird hawkmoths, poplar hawkmoths, elephant hawkmoths, small elephant hawkmoths, red-belted clearwing moths, hornet moths , common blue butterflies, small coppers, holly blues, orange tip, red admirals, peacocks, commas and ringlets to name just a few - but NO Painted Ladies.

Not one.

Even though my beautiful big buddleia was pretty-well planted JUST FOR THEM.

And I grow my thistles each year JUST FOR THEM.

 

But now.

Suddenly.

A full TEN YEARS on from that last (most recent) Painted Lady year of 2009, and eight years after we took out a mortgage on our current house ten miles east (ish) of the first "Swift Half" house, and I keep hearing that, finally..... we may be about to experience our next big Painted Lady year.

This summer!

I say I keep hearing that it's gonnae happen again this year (that is to say millions and millions of Painted Lady butterflies are gonnae flutter over here from the Med) as I first heard this a few times about a month ago, but I've only seen one Painted Lady butterfly so far this summer.  Now even the national news is cottoning on.

 

I've just dead-headed my big, blossoming Black Knight Buddleia, and checked on my thistles, (photos taken today with my phone, below) as I hear that this week is gonnae produce a 'totally-tropical' (you need to say those words in a certain way, or should I say with a certain 'lilt' *cough*) southerly wind, pushing temperatures up to the mid-thirties in this neck of the woods... and I would assume facilitate the passage across the Med and Europe and then The Channel, of all those millions of Painted Ladies I keep hearing about.

Fingers crossed, grapple fans, that my ten years of preparation and patience, and religiously-dead-heading my buddleia and encouraging my thistles, finally... FINALLY... pays dividends.

Ten years.

That's all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) butterfly painted lady vanessa cardui https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/ten-years-but-maybe-now-thistle-be-the-year Sat, 20 Jul 2019 10:17:52 GMT
Flying-Ant Half-Blood Thunder Buck Moon Eclipse.... Or something. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/flying-ant-half-blood-thunder-buck-moon-eclipse-or-something I always get a little sad as the Wimbledon tennis* championships end. It's like summer has finished before it has even begun - and I know my beautiful swifts will be racing back to The Congo in a matter of a couple of weeks (if not days in some cases).

Luckily, the weather yesterday, two days after this year's Wimbledon Championships finished in spectacular style on Sunday, snapped me firmly back into reality that OF COURSE summer isn't even a month old yet - there's plenty more to see and do before we all have to don long trousers and woolly hats again.

It was a steamy 28 Centigrade here yesterday. You could have fried eggs on our patio.  And with that came what I think was our first "flying ant day" of the year - at about four o'clock in the afternoon, it seemed like every wee fissure in pavements and patios nearby, erupted with hundreds of the sexually-active flying ants - which then flew around in huge numbers, bumping into windows and hedges and walls and the eager, open mouths of hungry house sparrows and starlings. 

Then at around ten o'clock in the evening, just as we went to bed as it happens, an orange (half blood) thunder (or buck) moon (the "name" for July's full moon) rose in the Southeast sky, with a large chunk missing (in the earth's shadow).

I'm sure there will be plenty of people who took FAR better photos of this partial eclipse last night. Perhaps they gave their photo some foreground context or perhaps they took their photo at around ten o'clock, when the moon DID look orange, rather than at around half-past-eleven like me, when all the orange colour had disappeared.

Anyway... it was lovely to see and for what it's worth, my photo of this flying-ant half-blood buck (or hay or thunder) moon can be seen below.

Yes, this IS a full moon. In a clear sky. Last night.

 

 

*Tennis is (I think) about the purest form of sport there is - and when someone like Roger Federer plays, it is nothing short of beautiful. Far more beautiful than "the beautiful game"....

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) buck moon flying ant hay moon moon" partial eclipse thunder https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/flying-ant-half-blood-thunder-buck-moon-eclipse-or-something Wed, 17 Jul 2019 05:50:04 GMT
I'll be(e) at the hole in the wall... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/ill-be-e-at-the-hole-in-the-wall Regular reader(s?!) of this blog will know that I like my bees.

My blue mason bees especially... but also my leaf cutters.

I have bamboo "hotels" up for them all over the gaff... but sometimes they ignore the hotels and nest in old practice (dry-run)  drill holes that I've occasionally made in the outbuilding walls, before I choose the correct-sized SDS bit and drill something, somewhere on porpoise purpose.

In the past, my dry-run drill holes in our external walls of the outbuildings have been used as lairs or, to use the proper, zoological term, "hidey-holes", for Segestria Florentina.

But this particular hole I happened across this afternoon, is being put to another use.

A few photos for you, then, below. All taken with the old Panasonic FZ50 and a snap-on Raynox DCR150 filter.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) leaf cutter bee Megachile willughbiella https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/ill-be-e-at-the-hole-in-the-wall Tue, 09 Jul 2019 15:57:54 GMT
Front and back https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/front-and-back A very quick blog post this morning to show you 

a) Our front "lawn".  (Or a small part of it anyway in the photos below). I've not mown it for weeks now - so it's a foot high mass of cats' ears, self heal, clover and birds foot trefoil (amongst others). It's kept deliberately unlike every other closely-mown lawn on the street (at least the bits of the street I've looked at) and as such its THICK with pollinators (you can actually hear them from yards away, so numerous are they). I'm pretty sure the neighbours look at our front "lawn" with horror, not realising this is quite deliberate and I look at theirs and think "biologically sterile".

 

b) Our back lawn. Complete with one of the pesky tree-rats cleaning and sharpening its teeth on a cigar-shaped bit of wood, watched closely by a cat who is of course, errr.... hiding behind one of my golf clubs.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) birds foot trefoil cats ears clover self-heal" squirrel https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/front-and-back Sat, 06 Jul 2019 10:02:28 GMT
"What three words". What fun! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/-what-three-words-what-fun After the rather aggressive post t'other day, I thought I'd lighten the mood somewhat and introduce you dear reader(s?!) to a fun little "app" I discovered today.

"What three words" is a useful... well.... fun little mapping tool, available for iPhone and android. The clever software people have divided the entire planet into fifty-seven TRILLION 3mx3m squares and assigning each grid square a unique, individual 3 word location phrase, based on a 40,000 word vocabulary. 

It may not be the future for post (actual PHYSICAL letters and parcels) as how one earth would you sort such stuff (our property for example has 40 or so 3M x 3M grid square locations you could use as our address, each with a unique three word phrase to identify and pinpoint it.

But it probably does have some uses. GPS and travel directions for example. I'm fed up of my car's sat nav asking me for a postcode of somewhere, then only allowing me to enter half the postcode and then asking for a property number on the road - even if the property HAS no obvious number.

This three word system sounds far more like it!

Anyway, serious uses aside for a moment - it's a lot of fun! (Forgive me, I love maps and words - this therefore is perfect!)

As I said, you can download the app for free, on iPhone or android. 

Give it a go  - it's a lot of fun!

Some screenshots from my app - and my list of (sometimes aptly named) favourites....

Above - my hastily-compiled list of saved "favourite locations" -some of which are below...

Above - Where I proposed to my girlfriend at the time, Anna, in the summer of 2007. On the most beautiful beach in the world - Myrtos Beach in Kephalonia, Greece. I won't tell you if we massaged abdomens afterwards... *cough*.

Above - same beach... and a lovely three word name for where we lay on our sunbeds. But were there weasels there at night, walking around under the stars? Probably. I dunno. We were elsewhere at night. Probably sipping Mojitos or Mythos beers at a taverna somewhere nearby.

 

 

Above. Where Anna (now my wife) then honeymooned in August 2008, near Aluthgama (Bentota) in an opulent, private (family-owned) cool (air conditioned), colonial, marble-floored, four poster bedded, palace in the steamy Sri Lankan jungle surrounded by giant geckos, leaf monkeys, flocks of fruit bats and huge, lurid-pink tropical dragonflies. No. I won't tell you whether or not we errr... "participated in improper dominance" there. *ahem*.

 

 

Above. My favourite place (so far) in the entire world. And very probably Anna's too. The impossibly-quiet (northern end) of pebbly Cirali beach, Lycia, Turkey. Where loggerhead turtles breed each year in their hundreds. And holidaying couples can be found backlit and intimately frolicking. But not us of course. *cough*.

 

 

Finally. Above. My and Anna's Maldivian hideaway. A Palm-roofed hut on a pure white beach, on a tropical atoll. In the middle of the Indian Ocean. And no... I'm CERTAINLY not going to tell you we spent a fortnight there "multiplying from underneath". *ahem*.

 

 

Look. Smut and innuendos aside, "WHAT THREE WORDS" is probably quite useful and a LOT of fun.

Download it and see what three word locations are special to you!

 

TBR.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) app what three words https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/-what-three-words-what-fun Fri, 05 Jul 2019 16:58:53 GMT
Birds 1. Dogs 1,000,000. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/birds-1-dogs-1-000-000 I read yesterday in The Independent, that a cocker spaniel swimming in a duck pond in Dublin (exact location below) was killed by a swan protecting its cygnets.

Cue outrage and horror from our dog-obsessed nation.

I'm afraid I read the piece in the Independent, originally reported in the Irish Times and laughed. (I know, I know... I couldn't help it).

 

Lines like: 

"The man said the swan attacked the dog, beating it “with one wing and then the other”.

And 

"He said: “That stunned the poor thing. Three or four more slaps and she was gone.”"

And even:

"The owner was so distressed, his phone fell into the pond, he added."

Just made me laugh. 

To be honest, it's the funniest tit bit of news I've read for months.

I actually guffawed with laughter on reading it!

 

NB. The rest of this blog post contains offensive language and may upset some readers. It is printed below, but typed in a white font. If you wish to read it, you'll need to copy the post from your PC, paste it into a word document, and change the font to black. If you can.

 

No. I'm not going to apologise for laughing at the story. If it was a human that had been beaten to death by a big swan protecting its cygnets I probably wouldn't have laughed... ('probably' being the key word there), but this was a shitty little cocker spaniel - let off its lead near breeding birds.

 

I'm sick of dogs at present. Let me be more specific. I'm sick of dog owners.

I regularly take 5 mile walks around the local area to keep my back strong - and if I'm not barked at or gone for or jumped on or all three by dogs let off their lead by their shitty-little dog walker owners, I've had a successful walk.  It's got that bad recently that I was walking around our local meadow, looking at the flowers and dragonflies and kestrels and seeing whether my eldest son's beloved cows had been returned to the field and I was jumped on and barked at by ALL THREE dogs I walked past on my five mile walk. 100% strike rate.

The crap these owners come up with too. It's so tedious.

"Ohhh don't worry... he won't hurt you" they whine, as their German Shepherd puts its paws on my shoulders and barks at my face, covering me in dog shit and saliva.

"BRUNO! BRUNO! COME HERE! BRUNO! Oh I'm SOoooo sorry! BRUNO! BRUNO! WILL YOU COME HERE!!!"

"Oooh! Don't you like dogs then?"

 

Well.... I grew up with dogs. I don't like small dogs (they, like ALL (yes... ALL) their owners are pathetic little runty things). But I DO like big dogs.

BIG DOGS THAT ARE TRAINED TO BEHAVE that is.

Big dogs that the owners can and DO control.

But I haven't seen any of those dogs recently. 

I'm not sure if they exist now - or they're all actually working dogs.

 

The Irish times went on:

They need to put up signs telling people to keep their dogs on leads around the pond. The swan was just protecting its cygnets.

"The incident occurred shortly before 11 am, at a time when dogs are allowed to roam off-lead in the park, which was busy at the time."

Uh huh.

In my recent (and when I say recent, I mean in the last four decades or so) experience, it matters NOT A JOT if you put signs up on land, saying "Please put dogs on leads. Livestock present (Or ground-nesting birds present in this area" etc.

The dog owners, who are ALL (yes, ALL) controlled by their dogs it seems, regard it as their (more specifically their dogs') absolute sodding right to be let off their lead and run around scaring livestock or ground nesting birds such as woodlark and nightjar.

I (especially) but also my wife (occasionally) have gone up to people whose dogs (often plural) are off their lead in an "ON LEAD" area (with signs everywhere) and the saliva-spraying indignation I've (we've) been met with is something to behold.

Two years or so ago, I did so at our local lowland heath nature reserve, where woodlarks and nightjars DO nest on the ground at this time of year, my wife and I and our eldest boy were walking along a boardwalk

through the heath - and a huge great Alsatian came racing down the boardwalk, baying. I pulled my son into my arms and turned my back on the dog. And waited for the owner. The dog ran a few rings around me and then bounded off into the heather, scattering lizards and woodlarks and wasp spiders and nightjars and silver-studded blue butterflies and golden-ringed dragonflies and tiger beetles etc etc...

The owner walked up the boardwalk after his dog about twenty seconds later, with the usual icy-cold torrent of drivel issuing from his mouth.

"Sorry mate. He won't hurt you. He's just being friendly!".

The dog's owner was taller and bigger than me (rare - I'm 6'3" and 200lb) but I've never been phased by that sort of thing.

I put my son down, walked up to the Alsatian's owner and quietly said:

"I'm sure. Now. Would you like to somehow ****ing explain that to my (****ing) four year old. And while you're at it, would you like to ****ing explain that to the rare birds which are nesting on the ****ing ground, right here, right now, which the signs you've walked past all ****ing tell you about".

I assumed that particular dog owner doesn't get challenged much - he was a VERY big bloke with a VERY big dog - but again, none of that really matters to me. Never has.

The bloke's eyes went like dinner plates as he stuttered and blustered and professed what he was doing was fine and I was in the wrong.

I just looked him very, VERY coldly in the eyes and said.... very quietly...

"Put your ****ing dog on a ****ing lead".

And I walked away. (I was, in effect, just protecting my cygnets).

 

This is not a rare occurrence for me.

And this was on a nature reserve with signs EVERYWHERE, telling people that rare birds were nesting so please keep your dogs on a lead and under control.

Dog owners in general (and let's not muck about - it's NOT the small minority) are pretty terrible at all this.

They let their dogs off leads when they are TOLD they shouldn't. They whimper to walkers, joggers and anyone else around that their dog that just noisily covered them in shit and mud and drool is "just being friendly". They think it's fine for large dogs to run at small children because "they're jussst being frrriendly!" They allow their dogs to crap and piss everywhere and only pick up their dog sh*te WHEN people are nearby. Watch out for this when you're next out and about - watch for a dog to start crapping - and then look at it's owner. Very often the owner will immediately look around the vicinity - to see if anyone is around and has seen their dog starting to crap. If they notice you, they'll visibly sigh as they then realise that this time, they'll have to pick up their dog's freshly-laid warm turd and put it in the plastic bag that they've been carrying around with them for months now. Of course they'll walk away with the bag, around the corner and toss it into a bush - where it'll hang off a branch for the next ten years.

So yes.

I say good on you, swan.

That's one for all the other swans, geese, ducks, woodlarks, lapwings, partridge, nightjars I say.

 

 

Footnote.

Now, if (as a dog owner) this blog post offends you …

Ohhhh I'm sorrrrreeee. I'm just being friendly! 

(Couldn't you telllllll?)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) dog swan https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/7/birds-1-dogs-1-000-000 Wed, 03 Jul 2019 05:53:36 GMT
Tiny wee things. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/tiny-wee-things Just a couple of shots of tiny wee things taken with my tiny wee old camera and tiny wee snap on Raynox DCR150 filter in the last couple of days.

 

A (female I think) "house jumping spider" (Pseudeuophrys lanigera) on our lavatory windowsill.

 

 

A froglet (Rana temporaria) on one of our pond lily pads. Soon to lose its tail and leave the pond.

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) froglet house jumping spider pseudeuophrys lanigera rana temporaria https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/tiny-wee-things Tue, 25 Jun 2019 17:23:32 GMT
New image uploaded to "Landscapes" gallery. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/new-image-uploaded-to-landscapes-gallery I've not uploaded a new image to this website for some time now, so thought I'd upload an arty-farty landscape image of sorts.

It can be found (to look at or to buy of course, in pretty-well any format you like from a design on a mug or apron to a double-decker sized fine art print) at my "landscapes" gallery HERE.  It actually looks far better when it's at it's full (HUGE) size. (I used my full frame 6D and then enlarged the image in "perfect resize"). It can also be seen below, although at a much reduced size, which doesn't really do it justice.

I rather think it would be perfect printed up to 6 foot by four and hung on the reception wall of Thames Water at Reading Bridge, Reading.

And for them.... and the sum of say £1000 - well they can have it!

Reading bridge in the ThamesReading bridge in the Thames

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) reading bridge reflections river thames https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/new-image-uploaded-to-landscapes-gallery Tue, 25 Jun 2019 17:09:18 GMT
The (biological) clock is ticking! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/the-biological-clock-is-ticking Regular reader(s?) of this blog website may know I found a lovely Puss moth caterpillar in our garden, early last July (on 5th July to be exact).

Admittedly this was quite early for a thirty day (roughly) old Puss moth caterpillar to be found wandering around looking for a place to pupate, as it will have hatched from its egg thirty days previously (around the 5th June) and been inside the egg on a poplar leaf for a couple of weeks before that - so will have been laid as an egg by its mother around the 22nd May.

You may also remember that I gave this caterpillar a nice bit of wood to pupate on, which it duly did - and its been residing in our empty chicken run since then.

I expected it to "eclose" forty or so days ago - in mid May - but it was only two nights ago now, around 1am on 22nd June that it finally broke out of its pupal case as a fully winged adult puss moth. (I check the pupa each morning and yesterday morning I found the below).

This puss moth adult will probably only live for a couple of months tops (if its not eaten by one of the bats that use our garden as their supermarket) - but it need to get its clogs on if it wants to breed (and ALL animals want to breed - it is after all the whole point of their lives).

If it manages to find a mate in one month say, the next generation will be laid as eggs on or around the 23rd July.

Two weeks to hatch makes that date 6th August.

Thirty days of caterpillar development makes pupation date 5th September.

And remember, pupation date last year for the moth I found was the 5th JULY!

 

No... my puss moth that "eclosed" two nights ago and flew orf into the big night sky as an adult puss moth simply does not have that time to find a mate and produce the next generation.

It's already between forty and fifty days (ish) LATER this year in its life cycle than last year and a good twenty or thirty days later than an "average" year I'd suggest.

It doesn't have a month to find a mate and produce the next generation as 5th September is TOO LATE for Puss moths to pupate. Probably.

My Puss moth needs to find a mate in the next week or two.

It really needs to get going NOW!

 

Footnote.

Some may be reading this thinking "well... that's a measure of just how bad the weather has been this year". But they'd be wrong.

My puss moth from last year did pupate early for sure - and that's more of a measure of just how good the weather was last year, but the weather this year here, especially in May, which is when my Puss moth should have emerged from its cocoon as an adult, was very nice and settled. It's only really been the last fortnight here that it has been wet and miserable.

So no... the wet weather in mid June here had nothing to do with the late eclosure of my Puss moth.

Perhaps it just wanted a long lie in.

The lazy get.

And now... NOWWWW... it's got to desperately make that time up.

Instead of a month or two to find a mate and produce eggs... it has a week or two. Tops.

The (biological) clock is ticking!

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) puss moth https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/the-biological-clock-is-ticking Sun, 23 Jun 2019 06:08:57 GMT
Bin a long time, bin a long time, bin a long lonely lonely lonely lonely lone-ly time. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/bin-a-long-time-bin-a-long-time-bin-a-long-lonely-lonely-lonely-lonely-lone-ly-time A few days ago after finding a dead hedgehog on the road 100 yards from our house and seeing what both my wife and I think is the vixen carrying three baby hedgehogs back to her cubs (on my trail camera footage), I wrote here that I thought that may be it for our garden hedgehogs, again. (I've been here before).

But I also wrote I hoped I was being a little premature.

Well... perhaps I was (being a bit premature), as a whole nine nights after all hedgehog life disappeared from our garden - look who snuffled up to its old den last night!

 

 

(It entered the garden via the (what I call "Irish") tunnel at half past ten, went back to its old den at half past two in the morning (a weird time for that behaviour, historically) and left again via the "Irish tunnel" at three o'clock - curling itself into a ball as the vixen stood over the tunnel for a while at the time). 

(The blue highlighted text above highlights the brief hedgehog clip in the youtube video above - the two other "Irish tunnel" clips were shot by my Bushnell* camera, so of course are of terrible quality and I won't be uploading them here. 

 

 

* Please... if you are considering buying a Bushnell trail camera... DON'T. They are terrible bits of kit. (Genuinely). Buy a Browning instead.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/bin-a-long-time-bin-a-long-time-bin-a-long-lonely-lonely-lonely-lonely-lone-ly-time Tue, 18 Jun 2019 06:38:40 GMT
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah! Zip-a-dee-ay! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/zip-a-dee-doo-dah-zip-a-dee-ay It's like a furr-eaking Disney film here tonight.

I've just put our eldest to bed and thought I'd pad 'round the garden to see wha g'wan.

As I approached our big poplar tree (with plenty of dead branches in it) I noticed a couple of young great tits, three young blue tits, one young robin and THREE young nuthatches... all singing and dancing around my head like a Disney medley.

I watched them for a while and then thought I'll try and get a few short video clips - with my tiny little camera that I can't really see to use without my reading glasses (and God knows where they are).

So I went back inside, fetched my matchbox-sized video camera and tried my best.

The (half decent, bearing in mind I was shooting blind) results are below.

 

It was clear that the three (recently-fledged) nuthatches were taking bird cherries from our tree by the chicken run and jamming them into crevices in the big black poplar that shades the rear of our back garden - great fun to watch - as I did for a good twenty minutes.

And yes, as I've already written above, it occurred to me as these delightful wee blue and buff birds danced around my head that to onlookers it'd have looked like a Disney film, at the back of our garden. Like Brer rabbit or something!

I finished my videoing, the birds finished their tea, bounced off through the foliage and me? Well... I skipped back inside, clicking my heels together and whistling the tune below. Well.... until me arthritic hip started clicking and me plantar fasciitis kicked in...

Have a lovely evening grapple fans.

And remember...

Zip-a-dee-doo-dah!
Zip-a-dee-ay!
Me oh My 
What a wonderful day.

Plenty of sunshine
Headin' my way
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah!
Zip-zip-a-dee-ay!

Hey, Mr. Bluebird 
On my shoulder
And if that's true
And actual
Everything is gonna be
Satisfactual

Zip-a-dee-doo-dah!
Zip-a-dee-ay!
Wonderful feelin'!
Wonderful day!

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) nuthatch https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/zip-a-dee-doo-dah-zip-a-dee-ay Mon, 17 Jun 2019 19:28:37 GMT
Is that it? Is that the (sad) end? (WARNING NOT FOR THE EASILY UPSET). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/is-that-it-is-that-the-sad-end-warning-not-for-the-easily-upset Regular reader(s?!) of this blog will know all about "our" hedgehog(s) - and the fact that I spend a lot of my time digging tunnels under our fences and doors to allow these hedgehogs the chance to move around freely and breed and escape foxes if possible.

I know that comes with a risk - these hedgehogs are then exposed to CARS and ROADS.

And with that in mind today it is with a (perhaps prematurely?) heavy heart that I bring you bad news.

 

I record the nightly nocturnal shenanigans in our garden with the help of two infra red video trail cameras.

For the past five nights I've not recorded any hedgehog activity in our gardens, apart from what LOOKS like the vixen fox taking three baby hedgehogs back to her cubs for food (I can't be sure that's what they are and won't post THAT video clip here) but again, that's what it LOOKS like.

Four mornings ago now I also noticed a newly-squashed hedgehog on the road outside our house, albeit 100 yards or so from our house (no distance at all for hedgehogs - ours used to regularly run the 40 yards of our garden in a minute).

 

 

Look... I've written "our" hedgehogs off before, at least twice.

But I've also SEEN previous hedgehogs in our gardens been EATEN by the local foxes and also SQUASHED by cars (and we live in a 20MPH zone!).

I may be premature again with my writing off of our local hedgehogs - but it really doesn't look good at present.

The video clip below is a compilation of the last four or five clips of our hedgehogs ("O" was our original, older, more "well-hung" male who seemed to disappear some time ago... and "P" was the taller, smaller, less well-endowed male I think).

The video clip does NOT include footage of the local vixen taking three (what looks like) baby hedgehogs back to her cubs across our garden, because I can't be 100% sure that's what the items in her mouth are. (She takes them across our garden one at a time).

The video also gives a little advice for anyone interested in helping our beleaguered hedgehogs.

Although I would add here, please don't encourage foxes into gardens. They really aren't great for anything else in the garden. In fact, that's putting it politely.

To be more frank, they're bleeding awful things, as far as the rest of "your" garden wildlife is concerned.

They'll EAT anything and everything - stag beetles, hedgehogs, newts, moths... the lot.

Of course the neighbourhood moggies will be blamed by the (often wilfully-) ignorant for killing millions of birds, (this has NO documented, appreciable effect (AT ALL) on garden bird numbers - garden birds in general are INCREASING in number unlike their specialist (farmland, heathland etc) counterparts), but cats simply aren't the problem in the UK like they are in (for example) Australia. 

FOXES are FAR more devastating in suburbia. And not towards birds of course.... but a problem to EVERYTHING ELSE.

 

Anyway... that's all for now.

Like I say, I HOPE I'm being very premature here and our hedgehogs are OK and perhaps even still around.

I'll keep putting the trail cameras out...

And I'll keep my fingers crossed.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/is-that-it-is-that-the-sad-end-warning-not-for-the-easily-upset Sat, 15 Jun 2019 07:01:47 GMT
Debt well and truly PAID. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/debt-well-and-truly-paid "The drought""The drought"

At the end of April I blogged HERE and speculated that generally, as the weather tends to "pay its debts" pretty reliably - and as such, bearing in mind we'd had such a dry April.... then we might perhaps expect a wet May.

May duly came and behaved itself - in fact May was very dry indeed.

But now... with June... comes the debt repayment.

In style.

I've just seen on the news that many places in England have had TWICE the expected rainfall for the whole of June in a couple of days - and a few places (like Pennerley in Shropshire, close(ish) to my inlaws), have had THREE TIMES the expected rainfall for the whole month in a couple of days.

Yep.

I think the debt has been well and truly paid off now.

(I also think that this year may well go down as another avian annus horribilis, at least as far as my beloved swifts are concerned... perhaps as bad as 2012 or 2007 or 2008 - all pretty terrible years for the best birds of all.  I'll give the "swift season"  (May-July inclusive) another month and blog about what I find).

More soon.

TBR.

Cloud burstCloud burst

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) june may rain swift weather https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/debt-well-and-truly-paid Thu, 13 Jun 2019 14:46:54 GMT
Ticking boxes... TODAY. RIGHT NOW. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/ticking-boxes-today-right-now

I'm regularly asked by people how they can see certain things. And "how come you have (seen x or y) Doug? You're SOOOOooo lucky!" (etc etc).

I suppose I am lucky generally, but very often this sort of thing is nothing to do with luck. You just need to put the hours in firstly and then make sure you've ticked certain boxes BEFORE putting those hours in.

Permit me to explain...

Commonly, if you want to see a specific beastie - and you set out on a day (or night) to see that beastie, you'd do worse than to learn about that beastie, compile a list of boxes to tick which would maximize your chances of seeing said beastie and try and tick as many of them as you can at the time of your trip into the wild to see that beastie. You'll still have to put the hours in mind, but fewer hours, MUCH fewer hours than if you'd ticked no boxes beforehand.

 

So.

For example, if you want to see a nightjar (and who doesn't it, let's face it?), you'd tick the boxes below:

Box 1 - Find a suitable area (large if possible) of lowland heath with areas of heather AND birch/chestnut/pine trees.

Box 2 - Go there at dusk (or just before dusk) during a warm, still June evening.

Box 3 - Keep listening....

 

And if you want to see a toad (and who doesn't... etc etc?), you'd tick the boxes below:

Box 1 - Locate a suitable, nearby "toad crossing" on the frog life website.

Box 2 - Wait until there's a night time temperature of at least 9 degrees Celsius with a little rain (or at LEAST moisture on the ground) in February (or if February is too cold (rare these days) March. These figures, conditions and months are SPECIFIC. Honestly.... it's like CLOCKWORK.

Box 3 - Get to your local crossing by dusk on that specific night.

 

 

We as a family decided t'other day to go and "hunt" hornet moths - lovely big moths that look like.... you guessed it.... giraffes. *cough*

Now - the boxes that need ticking to see hornet moths are pretty specific too.

If YOU want to see hornet moths (and who.... etc etc) then you need to tick the boxes we ticked last week below and it would be even easier to tick TODAY. RIGHT NOW.

 

Box 1 - Find a suitable clump or gathering or well established poplar trees. (We have these in the garden, but I know of a MUCH better spot by the Thames, about ten miles from us). Concentrate especially on poplar trees that have no thick vegetation growing around the base of the trees (the hornet moths don't like that).

Box 2 - Look for the tell tale signs of hornet moth infestation at the base of the poplar trunks (see my photos below).

 

Box 3 - Wait for a warm(ish), sunny, still morning in early June (June 1st-15th ideal) and go to your poplar trees before 10:30am on that morning. (a morning like TODAY, RIGHT NOW, would be absolutely ideal.

Box 4 - Keep walking around your "holey" poplar trees looking at the trunks no more than a couple of feet above the holes. The moths should emerge on these mornings, climb a foot or so up the trunk to find a little more warmth, pump up their wings and fly orf.

 

Tick those 4 boxes grapple fans, and you can see these lovely moths too.

DON'T tick those boxes though... and you'll probably never see a hornet moth in your life.

 

(NB - I should point out that we DIDN'T see any hornet moths last weekend - as we ticked the boxes and set off for the secret spot on the Thames, the clouds rolled over and the wind got up (see the windswept willows photo at the top of this post - taken on last Sunday's hornet moth hunt)  and all the lovely hornet moths thought "sod this for a game of soldiers" and kept under the bark of the poplars. Today would be a MUCH better morning mind - but we're all doing other things this morning. Are you?

Well?
Wotchoo waiting for? 

It's early June. (9th). It's warm and sunny. You know where your local established poplar trees are don't you? And it's nearly 10:30am......

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hornet moth https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/ticking-boxes-today-right-now Sun, 09 Jun 2019 07:46:42 GMT
Did you guess correctly? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/did-you-guess-correctly
Two days ago I blogged a question to you dear reader(s?!).

I asked you to look at the clip below and tell me what I saw, what I therefore feared and finally what (of course) actually transpired to happen a couple of nights ago, in our garden.

 

Did you guess correctly then?

The answer is in the extended video clip below...

Stag nightStag night

Sure, we're very lucky to have not one but TWO large stag beetle colonies in our garden(s)…. although I do culture that particular luck by managi8ng those colonies pretty well (adding nice logs from friendly local tree surgeons, to our beetles' wood piles every year).

Anyway.... you may begin to appreciate then, that I have more than a few good reasons to not appreciate foxes being in our garden.

They're pretty destructive things all round, I say - and to that extent, it may be worth reading that blog post I wrote three years ago on the subject of our local foxes digging up our (front garden) stag beetle colony. You can read it again HERE.

 

Nope.

Apologies to all "Disneyfied", British "wildlife-lovers" out there, but I'm really not a fan of foxes generally... and that doesn't look likely to change any time soon.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox stag beetle https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/6/did-you-guess-correctly Sun, 02 Jun 2019 16:03:44 GMT
Can you guess what happens next? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/can-you-guess-what-happens-next Morning.

I'm going to write a quick post and upload a short video today - and leave a question for you, for a day or so.

Then I'll upload another post during the weekend, to show you the answer...

OK with you?

 

Right.

Here we go then.

 

I would put money on many people being at best, confused by my well-publicised dislike of foxes (being that these people might often pigeon-hole me as an "eco warrior" or "environmentalist" or "green" or "animal lover" etc) and at worst, quite upset.

It matters not to me however - I'm afraid, rather like grey squirrels and rats - I don't really like to have foxes in the garden - like some people don't like to have cats, for example, in their garden.

Sure, right now I tolerate them, as a family seems to be using my hedgehog runs each night and at present we aren't keeping hens (we've kept hens for about ten years but currently have none - our chicken run is used as a tool and lawnmower store right now).

All I can say regarding the foxes right now, is that I hope they don't eat our hedgehogs - something I've recorded here TWICE in the past eight years.

 

Anywaaaay.

Last night I set the trail camera up in the back garden again, behind our pond - and it recorded some footage reminding me of yet another reason (if I needed one) why I don't like foxes in our garden.

The first 20 sec video in a set of five is below - I'll upload the next four 20 second clips as one 80 second clip during the weekend.

Your question on this clip is as follows - 

 

As soon as I saw this FIRST 20 second clip (above) on the laptop, I noticed something (you may need my eagle eyes to notice it too) in the clip and then immediately feared something would then occur in any following clips.

Unfortunately - that something then DID immediately occur -  and my trail camera recorded it.

 

So.

What did I notice and so what did I fear and so what then occurred?


I'll post the answer in a new blog post with that 80 second video, over the weekend....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/can-you-guess-what-happens-next Fri, 31 May 2019 09:06:42 GMT
Foxes again https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/foxes-again Just a 20 second video clip, shot early this morning by my Browning trail camera, of the vixen (I assume) and ALL THREE of her cubs entering the garden last night.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/foxes-again Wed, 29 May 2019 11:13:48 GMT
Foxes https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/foxes No.

I'm no particular fan of foxes. I think of them as mangy, smelly, filthy, noisy, damaging wild dogs, in the main.

But.

I know I've had a particularly good day, like I did yesterday (I played some absolutely sublime golf at a local course in the afternoon for example; and had a nice few relaxing beers afterwards) when even I look at some of the footage I shot of the garden last night (see short video below) and think to myself... "Awww... those wittle foxes look soooo cute!"

NB. This is just a tiny part of the footage I recorded last night with the rather good (WAAAAY better than Bushnell) Browning trail camera.

We have three cubs and two adult foxes visit our garden during the nights right now, but if I'd have uploaded all the footage from last night, the clip above would have been about 30 minutes long, rather than 1 minute.

 

So.

Whilst we currently don't keep hens (we'll start again before too long I'm sure) I'll put up with foxes - as long as they don't start eating the hedgehogs!

Enjoy your Bank Holiday Monday, grapple fans...

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/foxes Mon, 27 May 2019 08:41:22 GMT
An unexpected visitor this bank holiday... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/an-unexpected-visitor-this-bank-holiday Look what just dropped into our garden...

What looks (to me) to be a young diamond dove.

Must have escaped from a nearby private collection, I assume.

A first for me though, nevertheless.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) diamond dove https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/an-unexpected-visitor-this-bank-holiday Sun, 26 May 2019 10:03:33 GMT
Two hedgehogs now? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/two-hedgehogs-now I think this is a new development (but it may not be).

I think we now have TWO hedgehogs use our garden.

The video below (shot last night)  is annotated accordingly.

Enjoy the long weekend, grapple fans.

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/two-hedgehogs-now Sat, 25 May 2019 07:03:17 GMT
Nine ... or eight.... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/nine-or-eight Today, all of our blue tits have fledged. On day 21 out of the egg.

 

I think eight of the nine will be OK, but the 'runt of the litter' (see last photo below) will perish this afternoon or tonight or tomorrow morning I think - it can barely fly and is staying FAR too close to the ground, separated from its MUCH better developed brethren (and errr.... 'sesren'). Oh it's still being fed by its parents as it's constantly shouting at them - but there are magpies and jays and jackdaws and squirrels and hawks and cats in the hood.. and I honestly think it needed another day in the box.

 

Aw well.

Let's all cross our fingers and toes - and it may make it, but even if it doesn't - eight out of nine fledglings (out of ten hatched eggs, out of thirteen laid eggs) isn't too bad eh?

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) blue tit https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/nine-or-eight Sun, 19 May 2019 14:13:56 GMT
The sun has got his hat onnnn. Hip hip hip.... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/the-sun-has-got-his-hat-onnnn-hip-hip-hip … Hooraaaay! The sun has got his hat on and he's coming out to plaaaaaay.

 

And no... I'm not going to give you all the (rude) lyrics to this song... you'll just have to use google if you don't know what I'm talking about.

 

 

The photos below are of (in order)

 

a) A skylark singing against the burning May sun in a clear sky. (The white specks are bits of floaty seed heads, insects etc). I love taking these sorts of photos even though the end result doesn't appeal to many apart from me (and moy woyf!).

b) Frost's Folly Park countryside.

c) A swallow and a house martin taking a lunchtime drink and a bath at one of the wildlife ponds at Frost Folly.

SkylarkSkylark

Frost's Folly ParkFrost's Folly Park

 

 

And I'll leave you with a dreadful (quality) short video of a lovely lark singing its backside off, on a fencepost.

Dreadful quality as it was shot on a camera that I could easily swallow whole - and at full zoom.

Never mind.

I've never seen a lark singing from a fencepost before, so I thought I'd video it and now you can see it too....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) frosts folly house martin skylark swallow https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/the-sun-has-got-his-hat-onnnn-hip-hip-hip Mon, 13 May 2019 16:05:16 GMT
You MAY remember JULY? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/you-may-remember-july You MAY remember that I found a puss moth caterpillar in our garden last July - a puss moth caterpillar clearly looking for a piece of suitable wood on which to pupate.

So I gave it that piece of wood and it duly spun (span?!) a cocoon.

It's been there since then. For about 10 months.

And still is.

(I now have it wedged in the chicken wire covering our chicken run (we have no chickens at present) to facilitate its emergence and first flight into the night sky).

 

I'm only drawing your attention to this now, as MAY is the month when 'our' Puss moth should emerge. And should leave a hole in its old cocoon like this.

May is the month.

May be upon us.

Watch this space...

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) may puss moth https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/you-may-remember-july Wed, 08 May 2019 13:14:34 GMT
A little more clarity? HedgehoG (sing.) & foxES (pl.) https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/a-little-more-clarity-hedeghog-sing-foxes-pl A little more clarity now, after my three trail cameras picked up footage of the larger mammals in our garden last night.

In short  - I am pretty confident we have our single male hog, "HA" back with us - and he, (I think), is still alone.

Plus we also have at least three foxes visiting the garden now. Two adults (including one clearly lactating female)and one cub.
 
More soon, I'm sure.
 
 
 
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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/a-little-more-clarity-hedeghog-sing-foxes-pl Tue, 07 May 2019 09:44:31 GMT
Confused now... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/confused-now “There’s one antidote to gloom and despair that never fails: the wildlife that got us all going in the first place. It’s brilliant, beautiful, bewildering, intriguing and inspiring. We’ll probably do a lot more good if we spend more time outside engaging with it, rather than inside reading about or watching things (on TV) that make us angry (like Brexit, for example)….”

 

Six days ago I blogged that our single male hedgehog had gawn orf.

Six nights - no hedgehog activity in the garden - nothing on any trail cameras. NOTHING AT ALL.

But now, after last night's activity in the garden (picked up by two trail cams in the video below), I am completely confused.

So...

Please watch the video below. Accompanying text is in the video itself (so you know what you're looking at).

I am not sure WHAT to make of all the hedgehog activity in the garden last night.

So all I can say for sure is that:

 

1) We certainly did have only one single male hedgehog in the back garden which let itself out, 6 nights ago and hasn't been back since.

2) We think it returned last night (although the first hedgehog "HA" by the door in the clip above, does seem smaller and nippier than our original male hedgehog and more significantly- does NOT appear to have a great big penis, unlike our original male - although that might be because the footage is slightly fuzzy and thus unclear).

3) We think also at least one (probably just one) hog appeared at the other end of the back garden (although again... that cooouuulllld be just our original hedgehog ("HA") on its own).

 

It's always very difficult to put any sort of narrative to wildlife using just trail cameras and one really should avoid jumping to unevidenced conclusions with trail camera footage, even though... I know... it's tempting, isn't it? 

Trail cameras are unreliable and even if they are suddenly 100% reliable (i.e. they trigger without fail) because they are static (and the animals aren't), little can be deduced from footage.

Almost invariably if you're puzzled to what is happening in your garden (or wherever you've set up your trail camera or cameras), the obvious answer and most likely answer WILL be the eventual answer, you know.

So... your hedgehogs won't have all suddenly multiplied and broken down walls. 

And your foxes won't have all grown wings or been taken by a local cat/monkey/squirrel/tiger. 

 

The obvious and most likely answer about our situation last night after a year or so with just one hedgehog seemingly trapped in our gardens and now, 6 nights of NO hedgehog activity followed by a night of lots of activity from multiple (seemingly) hedgehogs is that quite simply, our original male hedgehog "HA" has indeed returned and is running around all his old haunts. NOT that he buggered off for six nights and suddenly six night later all the hedgehogs in the Parish have all, simultaneously discovered all my hedgehog tunnels under our fences.

I hope he has returned 'avec femme'. That'd be great. But I massively doubt it.

 

An old neighbour and friend of mine is having this same sort of problem (making sense of limited trail camera footage) in Reading, albeit with a family of foxes, rather than my small number (perhaps just one still) of hedgehogs. Also - it's a LOT easier to see the difference between male and female foxes than male and female hedgehogs at this time of year - although size is NOT … repeat NOT... to clarify - NEVER... an indicator of sex in foxes or hedgehogs (or many other animals for that matter).

So.

Tonight I'll put out three trail cameras and see what is happening in the garden.

I think I'll get footage of one hedgehog - maybe two... but unless I get footage of two hedgehogs TOGETHER in one clip, I'll be hesitant to draw any inferences from any clips I do get.

Again... all I can say fo sho, after 6 nights of NO hedgehog activity in the garden, is suddenly again, there's rather a lot. But I have no idea if all the activity last night was the result of our original hedgehog ("HA") returning, or whether there are suddenly two hedgehogs in the garden somehow ("HA" and "HB", despite only one entrance into and out of our gardens as far as I thought) or even perhaps THREE hedgehogs in our garden suddenly now, "HA", "HB" and "HC").

It's worth reiterating that point again.

I've been CONVINCED that the only way into our gardens (the five gardens in our "patch") was via tunnels I'd dug between our garden and our four neighbouring gardens and the tunnel under our side passage door, which allows any hedgehogs in or out to the wider world (and was, I thought, the ONLY exit to the wider world or entrance in FROM the wider world).  I may well have to rethink that theory after last night...

Watch this space....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/confused-now Mon, 06 May 2019 18:04:55 GMT
He's gone. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/hes-gone “There’s one antidote to gloom and despair that never fails: the wildlife that got us all going in the first place. It’s brilliant, beautiful, bewildering, intriguing and inspiring. We’ll probably do a lot more good if we spend more time outside engaging with it, rather than inside reading about or watching things (on TV) that make us angry (like Brexit, for example)….”

 

 

Regular reader(s?!) of this blog website may know about our single male hedgehog.

Trapped in three, perhaps four* of our local back gardens because like most Brits, our neighbours like their gardens neat and tidy and airtight (and DEVOID of wildlife), and all alone as the hedgehogs that had got into and used and bred in our gardens over the last 8 years had all moved on or been eaten by foxes.

*I say trapped in three or four of our back gardens but unless I'd dug tunnels under our fences it would have been trapped in just one (our western neighbours).

Well... a single male hedgehog is no use to the species - and it became obvious to me over the Spring this year, on waking from its annual hibernation, our single male hedgehog wanted to escape to pastures new. Find a mate. Raise rugrats etc.

So I dug a tunnel through concrete under our side passage door, with an SDS hammer drill.

At first, indeed for the last few weeks, our hedgehog used the tunnel most nights - but only explored our front garden for a minute or ten -always returning to our back garden and then under our fence to its home under the western neighbours' shed.

Over the last week, it stopped using our "concrete tunnel" at all.

And then suddenly... two nights ago, he (again) pegged it down our side passage, hesitated at the exit (so to speak), then squeezed through the concrete tunnel - and he never came back.

"How do you know he never came back?!" I hear you indignantly splutter through a mouthful of soggy cornflakes. "We've been here before, haven't we?"

Well, yes - I thought our male hedgehog had perhaps disappeared for good a few weeks ago, but my brace of trail cameras picked up the little shuffler the very next night  - but that HASN'T happened now for two nights.

Not one of my trail cameras has picked up any movement from 'our' single male hedgehog for two nights now - and I've put the cameras in ALL his favourite old spots.

So.

He's gone.

And whilst we are a little sad, the whole REASON I dug that final tunnel through the concrete is to give him that chance to go. 

To get out, find a mate and fulfil his desttttttinnnyyyyyyy. (To be said with a James Earl Jones voice, or similar).

 

I hope he returns.

With a female in tow?

But to be honest, right now, I'm chuffed he's gone and my main concern is that he doesn't get run over on our road (he's almost certainly not seen one before) before he has a chance to make himself immortal by passing on his genes to the next generation.

Good luck old chap.

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/5/hes-gone Thu, 02 May 2019 07:13:36 GMT
Be it dry or be it wet... the weather'll always pay its debt... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/be-it-dry-or-be-it-wet-the-weatherll-always-pay-its-debt As April ends then - and with that the swifts arrive...

It's worth noting that on average, where we live, we would expect to have 'received' c.22cm of rainfall so far this calendar year.

But so far this calendar year, we've actually only had less than 15cm of rainfall. 

Approximately two thirds of what we should have had.

 

You know the old adage.

"Be it dry or be it wet, the weather'll always pay its debt".

So.

Are we in for a soaking this May then?

"The drought""The drought"

Or will this May be as "scorchio" as last year?

Time will tell....

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) average rain sun weather https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/be-it-dry-or-be-it-wet-the-weatherll-always-pay-its-debt Tue, 30 Apr 2019 19:04:58 GMT
Watch the birdies... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/watch-the-birdies A brief(ish) post today as I've been rugby coaching and gardening all day, plus showing Ben a barn owl (a proper, live, WILD barn owl - he's a lucky boy innee?), pheasant and red-legged partridge families in the farm's hedges, buzzards and kestrels aaaaaannnnnd several hundred red deer on the Windsor great park

 

- so... well... we're all a bit cream crackered to be honest.

First bit of news... Our 13 blue tit eggs laid in our camera box below started hatching today.

A day or so earlier than I predicted. Well... it has been warm eh? That's great news for the 7 (we think) eggs that have hatched today. I expect the other 6, or most of the other 6 anyway, to hatch by tomorrow. We're all already having a lorra lorra fun watching both tits (FNAR! FNAR!) bring tiny wee brown and green caterpillars to the already ravenous tiny tits.

Talking of pairs of tits birds, it is with immense pleasure that I can report that as well as nesting magpies, woodpigeons, blackbirds and blue tits in the garden this year (pretty standard fayre to be honest), this year we ALSO have SONG THRUSHES doing the same.

It almost feels ridiculous to say this, but these wonderful, chevron-marked fruity-songed birds were EVERYWHERE in my yoof. I remember doing my paper round and watching them and listening to them belt their wonderful songs out from every other roof TV aerial (in the days of just three channels mind - how OLD am I?!).

The photo above I took in Reading during a snowy winter about ten years ago of two thrushes in a neighbour's garden... but as far as I was concerned as a boy... well... song thrushes nested in our garden in the Chiltern hills of South Buckinghamshire EVERY year.

But wind the clock forward thirty-five odd years to this year... and I'm sad to say that THIS pair of thrushes nesting in our garden, will be the first pair I've had nesting in ANY garden of mine, since the mid 80s.

I would never have guessed that as a boy in the 80s. (Incidentally we also had spotted flycatchers in the garden each summer (I've hardly seen one since) and also lesser spotted woodpeckers in the garden all year round (and I've NOT seen ONE of them AT ALL since)).

Anyway.

Wonderful news about the pair of nesting thrushes (picture and video shot through our kitchen  window below (yes yes dreadful quality I know - shot in haste with my tiny wee matchbox-sized camera) and the tits. The tits, all being well, now should fledge around the 17th May.

Watch this space.

 

 

 

Finally, in case you weren't aware, the best birds of all are NOW zipping back to blighty to spend the late spring and early summer with us....

Get your boxes up and your MP3/CD swift calls dusted down.

Now's the time!

SwiftSwift


 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl blue tit buzzard hatching eggs red deer red-legged partridge song thrush swift https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/watch-the-birdies Sun, 28 Apr 2019 19:19:43 GMT
A hideous, spectral, Moorish vampyre of old. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/the-hideous-spectral-moorish-vampyre-of-old On one of my poddlings around the town today (I needed a haircut and thought I'd walk 5 miles around the area afterwards), I happened across a big brown caterpillar on a pavement.

I picked it up and quickly realised it was a caterpillar of an "Old Lady" moth.

 

Now... various books or web guides or indeed pieces in the Telegraph will tell you that this moth was so-named because when it was named, it was fashionable for older ladies to wear long dark capes or cloaks or dresses.

Well. 

That would be a reeeeasonable assumption I suppohhhhse - although an incorrect one, even though EVERYONE says that IS the reason.

 

Look.

The REAL reason that this moth is called "Old Lady" in English, is on account of its scientific name - Mormo maura.

 

Now.

"Mormo" was a hideous she-monster. A bugbear. A spectral-bogeywoman of  Greek and Roman and (Mediterranean) North African myth. A mysterious female vampire which would visit naughty children at night and then BITE THEM.

She would of course be dressed in dark, flowing robes... and was generally depicted as old (not like in this image).

"Maura" on the other hand literally means of (old) Mauretania, of Moorish descent. (NB> Old Mauretania was further north than modern Mauritania).

This is where the Greeks and Romans told their children that the monster, Mormo, came from. (North Africa basically).

So... this moth is basically named after the vampire bogeywoman moth of the Moors (note the capital M) and not because Edwardian and Victorian laydeez wore dark capes.

Like a lot of things grapple-fans, you heard that here first.

 

Keep your eyes peeled for this large caterpillar right now.

You'll recognise it I'm sure by the fact that it is:

a) Quite large (incidentally - the adult Old Lady moth is VERY (for the UK) large)!

b) Has a black line across its rump. A thin, black line and NOT black tooth marks as in the lesser yellow underwing for example).

c) Has orange "spiracular" (write that down for your scrabble games) marks along its flank (see my close up photo above).

 

And you might like to resurrect the "Mormo myth" (I've briefly described above) if one of your bairns finds this caterpillar before you!

(Mwah ah ah ah aaaaaah!)  <- Maniacal laughter....

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) caterpillar old lady moth https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/the-hideous-spectral-moorish-vampyre-of-old Thu, 25 Apr 2019 15:39:12 GMT
The annual pilgrimage. The best yet. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/the-annual-pilgrimage-the-best-yet Bluebells (abstract)Bluebells (abstract)

I must have blogged here over the last however-many-years I've been running this website that I have a lifelong-fascination with woodlands. It's more of an addiction, to be honest.

Woodlands are genuinely where I feel most at home. Where I feel most at ease. Where I feel most relaxed and yet also where I feel most alert and alive too.

I spent A LOT of my youth in local woods, watching badgers, foxes, owls, deer etc - and that includes all-nighters, alone - something that most "normal" people would probably find terrifying.

To be honest, I've spent quite a lot of my adult life walking around woods too - without being too pretentious (I hope), it's almost PRIMAL with me - an attraction to woodlands. It's genuinely like the woods are my home. I feel FAR more comfortable in a wood, for example than a house. And when I was shift working in the 90s, I regularly slept, hidden in a local wood during the day, rather than go back to my HMO (at the time) and try to sleep there.

I know. I know. Ridiculous eh? It's just ONE of the thing even my closest friends find a little strange about me!

Right. Now that that's all said - these days, with a wife, two boys, a few animals and a mortgage - I can't enjoy woods as I used to, for hours and hours and hours on my own - but I DO try to lead the family to a suitable, beautiful local piece of woodland each April (or May) to see the spellbinding display of British bluebells.

Blurbell woodBlurbell wood

I say "British" bluebells, as we, in Britain have something like 126% of all British bluebells in the whole of the Britain. Or something like that.  

The wood that I've been taking the family to for the past seven years has been hacked to pieces over the winter. And I mean that. Dozens of trees have been illegally felled. We don't know who by nor why. A real, dreadful shame.

This is what it USED to look like (below) - but I'm afraid to say it doesn't look like this any more...

Bluebell wood at dawnBluebell wood at dawn

Secret copse at dawnSecret copse at dawnA small copse in a hidden Berkshire valley (which hardly anyone knows about and which erupts in bluebells each April and May - but only a very few ever get to see them).
This photo was taken just before dawn, from a car, in the rain - and even then the bluebells seemed to glow in the gloom.

Bluebell copseBluebell copse

 

So this year, I had to find another wood.

Which I did.

And to be honest, it's even better than the old wood  certainly much more extensive (in terms of area (acres) and indeed pure number of bluebells) - and it's nearer too.

I'll not write any more on this blog - I'll just leave you with a few images I shot yesterday on our annual bluebell pilgrimage.

Happy Easter, grapple fans.

TBR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bluebells https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/the-annual-pilgrimage-the-best-yet Mon, 22 Apr 2019 06:34:03 GMT
Puttock augmentation. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/puttock-augmentation KitesKites

We (and by "we", I mean my family here in East Berkshire, England) are used to seeing red kites, constantly.

To be honest, if it's not raining and we are outside and we DON'T see at least two or three red kites, something's (literally) amiss.

They're absolutely (bloody) everywhere.

Very different in the mid-80s, mind.

I remember holidaying in mid Wales in around 1986 and as a "bit of a birdwatcher", getting driven to a dark wood in deepest, darkest Wales in order to perhaps get a brief glimpse of one of the handful of kites that resided ONLY in that part of Wales at that time and in no other part of the UK. We didn't see any though. 

It struck me watching the kites in the blue sky yesterday, as we sat in a local beer garden having a pit-stop during our marathon 4 hour village Easter egg hunt, that even though WE see kites more regularly than buzzards or kestrels or sparrowhawks here (in fact unlike those birds, it's very difficult NOT to see kites here), we are incredibly fortunate to do so - across vast areas of the rest of the country - you'll see NO kites.

There's a reason for this.

On August 1st this year, it will be thirty years ago EXACTLY that five young (Spanish) red kited were released into a quiet valley in the Chiltern hills. A tranquil piece of countryside near the Chiltern escarpment at Stokenchurch to be more precise.

Me (before I got married and had children)? I was raised in the Chiltern hills (south Buckinghamshire) and my father (once divorced from my mother) lived for some time in Watlington, on the Oxfordshire / Buckinghamshire border, near Stokenchurch. He's back in Fife these days, by the way - and has been for a decade or so.

I returned to the Chilterns for a while in 1993 after living in Bristol for a bit (and somehow getting a zoology degree whilst there) and by the time I did, red kites were often visible around High Wycombe (where I lived and worked) and certainly, ALWAYS visible in and around Watlington and Stokenchurch where those five birds were originally released. (I think something like 88 were released in that valley in the five years between 1989 and 1994).

We regularly visited my father in Watlington and drove through FLOCKS of red kites... that sort of experience has been quite normal for me for what? Twenty-five years now.

But again, I was struck by the notion yesterday that the constant sight of kites soaring around in the sky above our heads is just not a thing for most people in the UK, despite the red kite being reintroduced in other areas of the country like the Black Isle (Morayshire) etc.

I thiiiiink in Berkshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire we have something like a third or more now (perhaps even half?), of ALL the UK's 4200 or so pairs of kites - in fact we have "so many" that young Chiltern red kites are regularly used to kick-start other reintroduction programmes elsewhere in the country.

It should be said, especially this year, exactly thirty years after those cinco Milanos Real (five Spanish red kites) were introduced into the leafy Chilterns, that this three decade old reintroduction programme has been a staggering success - for the kites as well as Natural England and the RSPB.

 

Footnote.

This is all very well, innit.

But why the title of the blog post "Puttock augmentation"?

Why didn't I just call it "Thirrrty years of bird.... nehhhhver stopped me dreaming" (or something).

Because "Puttock" is an old English (and to a lesser extent, Scottish) name for a red kite (or buzzard or harrier).

And the puttock's UK population has certainly been augmented over the past thirty years.

That's why.

 

Happy Easter, grapple fans.  And I hope you enjoy these blue skies as much as the kites down here are enjoying them.

TBR.

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) red kite https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/puttock-augmentation Sat, 20 Apr 2019 07:39:35 GMT
A premature "so long" then? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/a-premature-so-long-then Yesterday I blogged that I thought that perhaps our single male hedgehog had (at last) made a break for it.

But last night, to try to discover whether that notion (above and yesterday) was correct (or not), I set up all THREE of my trail cameras - only to discover our hedgehog was still VERY MUCH still around.

Video below… including a surprise (and not entirely welcome, it has to be said) vulpine visitor...

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fox hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/a-premature-so-long-then Wed, 17 Apr 2019 12:39:41 GMT
12 or 13. Then 13 or 14. Then 18 to 20. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/12-or-13-then-13-or-14-then-18-to-20 We have a pair of blue tits nesting in a nest box which I've screwed to a north-facing wall by our bathroom window. A box in which we have a wee camera.

Today our hen laid her twelfth or thirteenth egg (12 or 13). I can DEFINITELY count 12 and I thiiiink it's 13, but I can't be 100% sure as the nest cup is often covered by feathers.

The blue tit hen will lay an egg a day for about 12 days and only when she's laid her final egg, will she start incubating properly. That's a 1p piece below, by the way, NOT a 2p.

 

 

Today she started incubating.

She'll incubate for about thirteen or fourteen days (13 or 14) - and then the eggs should hatch. Pretty-well all on the same day.

Then she'll (and her mate if he's still around) feed the developing young until they fledge (leave the nest) at around eighteen-twenty (18 to 20) days old.


Long and short of it, if all goes to plan, we have 12-13 eggs  which should turn into nestlings after 13 or 14 days which I hope will all fledge successfully after a further 18 to 20 days.

 

30th April - predicted hatching day.

19th May - predicted fledging day.

If. (Big IF). All goes to plan.

 

NB. As usual... all photos on this post are taken by me.

The photo of the TV screen is of our current nest.

The photo of the eggs (and yes that's a 1p piece (NOT a 2p) is from a failed nest brought to my attention when we lived in Reading about 9 years ago now.

The photo of the young, newly-fledged (yellow-faced) blue tit, was one of our successful fledglings the last time we had a blue tit nest here in our current house in Berkshire (near Reading). And yes that is my hand. The wee thing needed a little help from me to fledge successfully. That was five years ago now!

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) blue tit nest https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/12-or-13-then-13-or-14-then-18-to-20 Tue, 16 Apr 2019 17:09:13 GMT
Has our hedgehog finally taken the plunge? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/has-our-hedgehog-finally-taken-the-plunge Regular reader(s) of this blog will know all about our single male hedgehog and my efforts to try and cajole him to leave our garden (where he ain't gettin' any) to explore pastures new, (the front gardens of the road) where as long as he avoids the cars, he maaay just get to sow his wild oats with a purty lil laydee hog - and so pass on his genes.

I've been leaving one of my trail camera out each night, and recording him leaving the back garden via my tunnel (matron) under our side passage door, but always returning within a few minutes (often as little as one minute and a maximum of fifty-odd minutes later).

Last night however,  whilst my camera recorded him leaving the garden as usual...

...my trail camera didn't (for once) record any footage of any return to our back garden, of "our" male hog.

Now... my trail camera isn't infallible. It takes 20 seconds or so for it to "recharge" after shooting a 20 second video and be in a position to record another 20 second video - soooo... our hog could have shot back into our back garden within 20 seconds or so - plausible... especially as the next video shot after the one above, did contain some soft hedgehoggy noises that could have been made by our hog as it sprinted back into our back garden, avoiding the trail camera firing again as it did so.

Or... it could be the case that the hog has had enough of poddling 'round our back garden(s) on his tod - and has finally decided to go huntin'. Huntin' for a mate. 

If that is the case, then... well... I'll be sad to see him go. 

But the WHOLE reason that I dug that tunnel is to give him the chance TO go.

I'll leave a camera or three out tonight to see wha g'wan.

There's a good chance that one of the three cameras will record his nightly meanderings as normal (and that'll be fine)… but there's also a chance that he really has gone - so my cameras will be recording nothing - and in that case, well... good luck to the prickly little thing.

Watch this space.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) back garden concrete door front garden genes hedgehog life male randy side passage single tunnel https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/has-our-hedgehog-finally-taken-the-plunge Tue, 16 Apr 2019 16:45:00 GMT
UNGAWA BUNGARRA! (In "The Emerald Shitty").... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/ungawa-bungarra-in-the-emerald-shitty Although I HAVE seen my first swallow of the year at the golf course t'other day, I've not been able to get out as much as I'd have liked so far in my week off.

This is primarily because I've been doing some jobs around the hyse.

Like deep cleaning our lav (nice!) and painting it an emerald green colour. (The last time it was painted was about 8 years ago when we moved in - and painted it blue).

 

The paint I used is actually called "Emerald Glade".

 

And as I've painted the lav (room) with it - I'll now refer to that room as "The Emerald Shitty".

 

At present we have a painting of three giraffes in "The Emerald Shitty"... as well as that photo of that crested macaque.

 

But neither of those lived in "The Emerald City" did they?
 

Which is why I'm going to take (at least) the giraffe painting down (and put it elsewhere - as I like it) and replace it with this lovely original aboriginal linen print of a couple of Sand Goannas (or "Bungarras". Just as well Tarzan lived in Africa eh, as if he'd have lived in Australia, he would had to have cried "UNGAWA, BUNGARRA!" at these lizards, I guess)?

 

But why am I going to put this aboriginal print of a couple of Bungarras in our newly-named lav (room) then?

 

Some of you may be there by now, but go on then... for those that aren't....

 

THE EMERALD SHITTY WAS THE HOME OF THE LIZARD OF OZ, wasn't it?

 

Thangyew. Thangyew very much. I'm here all week. Try the fish.

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) bungarra sand goanna https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/ungawa-bungarra-in-the-emerald-shitty Wed, 10 Apr 2019 18:21:11 GMT
Browning > Bushnell. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/browning-bushnell As regular reader(s) of this blog might appreciate, I've been using trail cameras to record videos of wild animals for some time now - be those wild animals be little owls

Owl watch 26th February (1)

or tawny owls

Owl watch - Tawny drops onto new barn

or even barn owls

(Barn) owl watch 1st Feb 2014

or roe deer

Deer watch - 30th October 2011 at 04:13 GMTThis short clip was recorded on only the second time my trailcam has been left out in the "joan wilders", rather than in the garden.
I'm particularly fond of roe deer and hope to obtain more footage, as and when.

 

or badgers (and badger cubs and foxes and fox cubs and muntjac deer)!

May 2012 Badger watch (and other mammals) early May 2012

or hedgehogs (and woodmice)

Hogwatch - 11th Oct 2012 - A.Sylvaticus drops in

 

or even kestrels

Breeding kestrels (1)

or how about red-legged partridge?

Owl (and partridge!) watch - 20th June 2012

And I've had some success, it has to be said.

But that (dare I say) came thanks to a lot of what people call "fieldcraft" from me, rather than the superb technology of trail cameras - in fact many times I thought I've got good footage DESPITE the trail camera, not because of it.

Not many (no-one?) apart from me has filmed breeding kestrels and little owls on a trail camera throughout the season.

And during those seasons, it became acutely obvious to me, watching the birds and my trail cameras from afar (100M or so away), that whilst the birds were performing well for me and my Bushnell trail cameras... the cameras themselves weren't at all - I was missing HOURS of footage as the cameras just wouldn't trigger.

And even when they did trigger at night - the footage was barely watchable (see barn owl clip above).

 

I also became painfully aware at the time (we're talking between 5 and 10 years ago now) that fellow, let's say "wildlife enthusiasts"... were "reviewing" (promoting) Bushnell trail cameras, after they were seduced (for want of a better word) by Bushnell, with freebies.

 

The problems with Bushnell were numerous and I've almost certainly gone into them at length before on this blog, but in a nutshell...

a) The trigger speed was SILLY slow. OK for slow moving (American!) beasts like Moose etc. Not great for smaller, faster things generally.

b) The trigger didn't even fire, many many times.

c) The night footage was almost unuseable

d) The power supply (batteries) was unstable.

e) Last but certainly not least... the design was incredibly user unfriendly (for loads of reasons which I won't bore you with here, again).

 

Well.

I still own two old Bushnell trail cameras (because they were expensive and I don't want to throw them away) and as you know, I've still been using them. With limited success.

But now, I also own a Browning Special Ops Advantage trail camera, bought from "Nature spy" in North Wales, a few days ago.

Unfortunately the first camera I bought was a dud (screen didn't work and the camera had what I call "runaway flu" (took videos constantly -that is to say the PIR sensor was constantly triggering even in a cool cupboard) but the good peeps at Nature Spy sent me another yesterday, whilst I was at Twickenham with my eldest boy watching the rugby... and I have to say... compared to my old Bushnells - it's like chalk and cheese. 

Sure, I've only used it once in anger so far (last night). But right now, I'm VERY impressed.

a) The trigger speed I think is about 10X faster than my Bushnells. Maybe 0.5 secs instead of 5! Makes a WORLD of difference.

b) The trigger  seemed to fire every time. Although it maaay be too sensitive. Time will tell.

c) The night footage was SUPERB. And the day footage too was SO much better than the Bushnell.

d) The power supply (batteries) so far has been stable AND well designed. 

e) Last but certainly not least... the design was incredibly user FRIENDLY (So much better than Bushnell).

A video of our hog in our side passage can be seen below (taken with TBR 26 - the Browning camera).

Hog passage. (Browning trail camera)

 

Now compare that to a similar video taken by an old Bushnell  (search for "teebeearr" in YouTube to see my channel).

Chalk and cheese like I say.

 

Again, I know... I've only tested this Browning trail  camera once so far... and still remain concerned about the trigger being too sensitive perhaps. I think it maaaay be triggered by moving grass or leaves etc... but again. So far I'm so much more impressed with Browning than Bushnell.

Another example, from where I'm sitting, of a company thinking they are the only players on the field... resting on their laurels and being overtaken by hungrier newcomers.

Well done Browning.

I think you have a convert in me.

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) browning bushnell trail cam https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/browning-bushnell Sun, 07 Apr 2019 06:15:27 GMT
Hedgehog indecision https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/hedgehog-indecision Far from disappearing forever to the land of milk and honey, after discovering the tunnel I chiselled under our side door for it (as I suggested might happen in my blog post yesterday) - our male hedgehog spent a grand total of about 4 minutes on the other side of the door last night. He seems unsure...

 

 

He first left at 0113hrs last night.

 

 


And then was back 2 minutes later….

 

 

Then again left at 0125hrs

 

And was back again just 2 minutes later – this would be the final time he used this tunnel last night - after leaving us a present in our side passage from his back passage at 13 seconds into this 45 second clip below...

 

 

NB. I think this may be the last hedgehog/door/tunnel video blog I post here... unless something definitive happens (he leaves for the night, or he leaves permanently (doesn't come back) etc).

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) door hedgehog indecision poo side passage tunnel https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/hedgehog-indecision Wed, 03 Apr 2019 05:56:06 GMT
SUCCESS! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/success A couple of days ago, I blogged about our randy, but frustrated (if hedgehogs get frustrated as such) male hedgehog.

I blogged that I drilled and chiselled a tunnel under our side passage door, so it could explore* pastures new.

* I should remind reader(s) that whilst I've dug tunnels under our fences, which it uses each night, to explore our garden and the gardens on each side of us, it's clear that our neighbours haven't done similarly, so it is, in effect, trapped in our three gardens - one of which (our arsehole Eastern neighbour's garden) is what I call a "Tellytubby garden" (manicured and not good for wildlife).

We have had a family of hogs before, but I think old age or a fox did for the female (I found her hollowed out spiny pelt by our fence a year or two ago now - clearly eaten by a fox, although I'm not sure if she'd just died of old age / illness before the fox found her... or whether or not the fox did for her).

It matters not any more - the fact is... we have a singular male hedgehog trapped in three gardens here.

Until last night, that is.

Yes I took my SDS drill and dug out a tunnel for the hog a few days ago - and last night... HE USED IT!

 

 

He didn't seem interested at 0337.

 

 

But then at 0414... took the plunge!

 

 

And returned at 0508 after exploring the front garden(s?) for about 55 minutes. I also videoed him returning home under our (good, Western) neighbour's shed three minutes later.

NB. That is a junior size rugby ball next to the door in the videos, so viewers get an idea of size of the hedgehog. (Of course that would necessitate you knowing how large a junior-size rugby ball is... but you ALL know that don't you?!).

 

So.

We have a result!

And this shows what a little observation and a little effort can do for your local hogs.

Now.

The bad news.

Our hog WAS trapped in three gardens, away from any road, until last night.

But there was little point him being alive really, without any real prospect of breeding - after all, like it or not... the whole POINT of life is to CONTINUE life.

So we've provided him an escape route to perhaps find a mate - and do what he's meant to do.

But that ALSO means we've provided an escape to the road network - we, like (pretty-well) everyone else in the UK, live on a road... and we've already seen one of our front garden hedgehogs squashed a year or two ago.

Yes... look... at my darkest, I'm half expecting him to explore our front garden(s) more and more this year and quite quickly be squashed on the road.

But before then, I hope he manages to pass on his genes - again... that's the whole point of (if not human) animal (and plant) life.

He may of course disappear under the door tonight and never come back.

But as far as I'm concerned, although sad (as we'll miss having a hog or hogs in the garden), that will be a result.

I'm doing this for the wildlife after all... and NOT the humans.

 

Anyhoo... we're made up here. Our efforts to provide escape routes for our hog(s) have again paid dividends.

And I can't help thinking that our male hedgehog has gone to bed today, excited about a new world suddenly being opened up to him.. a world where beautiful lady hedgehogs waddle around invitingly - and whole supermarkets of slugs and beetles await.

I know.

I'm getting all Springwatch on yo ass, aren't I?

I'll leave it there then.

More soon...

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog success https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/success Tue, 02 Apr 2019 06:45:50 GMT
What if we're ALL just flies on a leaf? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/what-if-were-all-just-flies-on-a-leaf I was sitting under one of our poplar trees in the garden today, at lunch.

I was sitting in a garden chair - soaking up the early Spring sunshine - and watching various insects (mining and mason bees, wasps and flies) soak up the sun too, way above me... on the nascent, lime-green poplar leaves unfurling from their sticky brown buds (and growing nicely now), twenty feet or so above my head.

I thought I'd take a photo or two.

Here's one.

This is a simple shot taken from ground level, using my new(ish) Panasonic pocket camera, of the small-but-growing poplar leaves, from below, one of which has a fly sunbathing on it (looks like a flesh fly or a greenbottle perhaps  - but I can't be sure).

I then started thinking (dangerous I know).

This fly sitting on the new poplar leaf twenty feet above my head, couldn't possibly KNOW that there was another organism FAR below the leaf, invisible from its viewpoint, taking images of it (or at least its shadow) from way below.

I doubt whether the fly would have the cognitive abilities to begin to even grasp such concepts of other invisible organisms taking still images of a moment in time in its life on technology that would be completely out of its world, in so many ways.

Of course it wouldn't.

It couldn't.

It's just a fly, after all.

 

But....

 

What if I'm just a fly. Or something like that.

And you are, too. (Don't think you escape my random witterings!)

We're on a leaf.

A leaf that we call "Earth".

And something, somewhere, unfathomable and invisible to us, is sitting there recording moments of our "lives" on a camera or video recorder or something else that we (as flies after all), couldn't even begin to comprehend.

 

You know.

My mother once said to me (after I probably wittered on about an idea like this) "Douglas, we can only live on the planet we live on". (Meaning.. "why don't you keep your feet on the ground, you halfwit!"

Fair point I suppose... but it is occasionally nice to wonder isn't it? It sometimes makes your problems seem quite small, too or at least it makes you temporarily forget them!

 

 

Now that that has made you think. (Or drool?!)

I'll leave you with something else that I photographed today.

A lovely rose chafer.  (And before you ask, no... that isn't rose chafer poo on my wedding ring finger - its the remnants of a blood blister, caused my wedding ring chafing against my finger at speed as I drilled/chiselled a hedgehog tunnel through concrete t'other day).

I know tomorrow looks decidedly dodgy, weather-wise, but for now grapple fans, at least here, Spring has most definitely sprung!
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fly rose chafer https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/4/what-if-were-all-just-flies-on-a-leaf Mon, 01 Apr 2019 16:16:42 GMT
Arseholes, penises and tunnels. (This should get some views!) https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/3/arseholes-penises-and-tunnels-this-should-get-some-views A wee while ago I mentioned here that I've noticed a hedgehog return to our garden, despite our arsehole neighbours (at least on our Eastern side, the "Westerners" are just fine - see below), blocking up the tunnels that I've deliberately dug under our fence for the hogs.

You may be thinking that it's our neighbours' "right" to block up tunnels under our fence.

Well. I guess it is. It's also their "right" to be arseholes of the highest order, too.

Firstly, it's OUR fence (not theirs), we've paid for it and maintain it - and secondly I've TOLD THEM about the (tiny) tunnels - which they, at first, (at least to my face - like all cowards), agreed was fine.

No... I'm afraid they really are arseholes and have demonstrated that many times over the 18 months (only) that they've been living in the house alongside us.

That all said, a hedgehog has returned to our garden, from our (much older) Western neighbours, who I've also talked to about the local hedgehogs (since discovering one literally trapped in a neighbour's garden when we moved here almost 8 years ago now) and have kindly facilitated a hog tunnel (bridged by a clay half pipe) under our fence (on my suggestion) - see video (shot last night) below.

 

 

I'm always keen to provide as many opportunities for hedgehogs to get around and breed … as I regard the current situation regarding hedgehogs to be tragic - this is why I am constantly digging tunnels under our fence(s)… and now (see below) doors!

 

Regarding this year's hog(s) -I needed to establish firstly, whether it was just one hog - or two or more - and also sex it/them if possible.

It's very difficult to sex a hedgehog* (MATRON!) without picking it up and unfurling it (as it will have rolled into a ball of course) and then looking at its genitals - but then it's relatively easy, as male hogs have a noticeable penis halfway up their tummy it seems.

*Reminds me of that joke - How do hedgehogs have sex? Caerphilly. Carefully.

Anywayyyy…. I've been recording these hedgehogs'/this hedgehog's movements over the past week or so and have ascertained that:

 

a) We only have one.

b) It's a male.

c) It's a well-hung male!

d) Whilst it uses all of my extensive garden fence tunnels (apart from the one that our a-hole Eastern neighbours have blocked again) it seems to want to run down our side-passage and get out to the front garden and therefore the wider world, under our side-passage door. It seems to have got the strong urge to continue its genes, if you know what I mean? 

 

I discovered points b) and c) above ( that it is a male hog (and pretty well-endowed male at that)) by placing one of my trail cameras on the flag stones of our side-passageway and videoing it from hogs' eye level.

You can perhaps see from the videos below (and certainly from the stills) that this is clearly a male hedgehog!

 

And I discovered point d) by videoing it over several nights, running down to our side passage door

 

and then  running back.

 

 

Now... our side passage door does have an inch or two gap under it - but certainly not a big enough gap to allow passage of a quite large, randy male hedgehog... so last week I took my wonderful SDS drill to the concrete floor under the door and drilled (well... chiselled on SDS hammer setting) a tunnel in the concrete to allow the hog to escape our garden from the front, as well as the sides. See photos below.

 

 

I've been videoing it (since drilling this tunnel), with varying degrees of poor success (so I won't put a clip up yet) - but it would be fair to say that at present, the hog IS visiting the tunnel under the door, but hasn't yet attempted a "squeeze through". I think it may need widening.

The tunnel that is, not the hog.

So that's what I'll do today with my lovely big drill (MATRON!).

 

I hope this works and our poor old randy male hog can squeeze through the new tunnel under our side passage door, literally dragging his penis along the ground with him - and yes I do understand that if he does manage to leave, he may never come back - and we will perhaps lose ANY hedgehogs in our garden for some time.

But I'm doing all this, laydeez and gennelmen, for the wildlife - and NOT us humans.

If our hog needs another tunnel to escape to find a mate... and therefore deserts us... then so be it.

I'll be sad to see it go... but go it probably needs to.

Watch this space... 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) hedgehog https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/3/arseholes-penises-and-tunnels-this-should-get-some-views Sat, 30 Mar 2019 08:22:26 GMT
Hidden in the Holi. (A quick bird call ID test). https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/3/hidden-in-the-holi-a-quick-bird-call-id-test A short post today, as it's waaaay too nice to sit inside tapping away at a 'pooter (which seems to be on the blink anyway).

The park is full of people in shorts, having pic-a-nics.

Full of colour too.

Bright yellow forsythia.

Soft pink and white magnolia, blackthorn and cherry blossoms.

And the first nascent green leaf buds on trees and hedges all over the shop.

Plus today a wonderfully-colourful bunch of Hindus celebrating "Holi" by bunging a load of bright pink, orange and blue dye powders around and on each other (I asked them what it was they were celebrating and they were very happy to tell me all about it).

I'm teaching my eldest boy how to really control his bike at the park at present.

Uphill. Downhill. In the saddle. And out. Tight turns. At high speed. At low speed. Cross country. And on tarmac.

Thought I'd video him today and at the same time record (in the background) a lovely bird, calling loudly and repetitively.

My eldest boy in this video can (certainly!) name the bird calling in the background (I make it my business to point this sort of stuff out to him, so it doesn't get missed by him)...

But can YOU?

Have a go...

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) call can you name it holi mystery bird https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/3/hidden-in-the-holi-a-quick-bird-call-id-test Sun, 24 Mar 2019 15:11:35 GMT
Four days before (astronomical) spring starts - and the garden springs into life. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/3/four-days-before-astronomical-spring-starts---and-the-garden-springs-into-life “There’s one antidote to gloom and despair that never fails: the wildlife that got us all going in the first place. It’s brilliant, beautiful, bewildering, intriguing and inspiring. We’ll probably do a lot more good if we spend more time outside engaging with it, rather than inside reading about or watching things (on TV) that make us angry (like Brexit, for example)….”

 

 

Just a quick garden "SITREP" if you like, this morning - as there's quite a bit going on at Black Rabbit Towers at present.

 

  • Our male (I think) great tit, which roosts in our tit camera box each winter has been ousted by an insistent blue tit, which has cleared out the hundreds of great tit droppings from the bottom of the box and now has spent a week or so filling up the box with moss. We've been here before with this box. When I fixed it to the back wall of the garden, at the end of the 45 yard garden, it was nested in - and most of the fledgling blue tits survived into adulthood I think. (I know that one didn't make it past day two though). But... ever since I fixed it (the camera box) to the north-facing wall of the hyse, under the eaves, even though blue tits have shown an interest, they've never actually nested in it. Anyway - at present these blue tits DO seem intent, this year, on nesting in this box - which as it has a camera in it, might be fun to watch for us all here.

 

  • Talking of nesting birds, we've got a large dead damson tree in our back garden, all covered in cheese, ivy, in which a pair of magpies have been building a nest now for over a month. I know, I know, magpies are like the local bird mafia - but they are stunning to look at, aren't they?

 

  • Talking of the magpies... as I was tepeing between my teeth last night, I heard the pair of magpies shouting at something from their ivy/damson nesting tree. I assumed a cat was making a nuisance of it itself up the tree - but I assumed incorrectly  - as I then heard a very distinctive male tawny owl call from the same tree. Now I can't be 100% sure that that's the first time a tawny owl has been in our garden... but it's almost certainly the first time I've heard one in our garden. Oh I regularly hear them around our garden, but I'm pretty sure I've never heard one IN our garden - so that was a little bit of excitement last night, before bed! (But no... I don't expect it to stick around by the way).

 

  • Taking of predatory birds - I noticed a dead dove by the pond, from the kitchen window t'other day. On closer inspection (see photo below) I deduced pretty quickly that it has been hit by a female sparrowhawk (a dove would be too big for a male hawk to take on) and the hawk had killed it and immediately started plucking its chest, as they do, to get to those two juicy bits of breast muscle. There were a few feathers lying around in the long grass surrounding the pond and some pluck marks in the dove's chest. But.... the hawk had gone. Well before it had had a meal. So again, I deduced that it had been spooked by something. Perhaps a magpie (which are nesting next to the pond in that dead damson tree - see above), but much more likely by a cat.  The hawk didn't come back for its meal (it must have been well spooked!) but something polished off the dead dove a night later (see below).

 

  • I left the dove in the garden, expecting a red kite to swoop down for it (as they've done with dead birds in our garden in the past). No kite did come down - but a fox clearly found it during the night (or more likely next morning before we got up), took it to the secret den part of the garden and ate it ALL. See photo below.

 

  • Taking of creatures of the night - it is an absolute JOY to report that despite the best (worst) efforts of our arsehole neighbours, a hedgehog has appeared again in our garden. (See videos below). Christ knows how, to be honest, with neighbours both to our east and to a lesser extent the west, displaying the worst type of environmental ignorance (not to mention intellectual barrenness). But it IS back and I hope, boy do I hope that it finds a mate somehow, perhaps using one of the tunnels that I have (obviously!) dug under our borders. 

 

 

  • Finally, we of course, again have a pond full of rampant ranids at present and quite a lot of spawn (see very poor photos below taken in a huge hurry from distance this morning). I hear it may get cold on Sunday (coming) night - but I hope there's enough frogs movements (writhing in their orgy ball) in the pond to avoid the pond freezing over and killing some of that spawn.

 

OK.

That shallot.

Spring is about to spring eh?

And I can't wait!

TBR.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) blue tit collared dove female sparrowhawk fox frog frogspawn great tit magpie male tawny owl https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/3/four-days-before-astronomical-spring-starts---and-the-garden-springs-into-life Sat, 16 Mar 2019 11:17:00 GMT
What do I love... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/what-do-i-love In an online world often seemingly filled with what we hate or criticise or what we have a problem with, or what makes us worried or anxious or furious... today, I'm going to write a short blog post about nothing more than what I love... and that's all.

Of course, this being a wildlife blog, I won't mention things I love like my wife. Nor boys. Nor hens. Nor cats. Nor Bristol rugby team. Nor cottage pie. Nor ACDC. Nor the Lycian coast.

I'll try to keep to natural, wildlife things found in the UK. 

Some you'll agree with. Some you won't. But that's fine.

This is my list and whilst certainly not exhaustive, is comprised of things that I could think of that I love, pretty-well immediately.

I expect I'll add to it in the days ahead...

 

Here we go then...

 

The solitude of dawn. The best time of the day. Always.

The magic of dusk. When the humans retire and the animals stir...

The prettiest-feathered of all our owls I think - tawnies - and their wonderful, winter mating calls which cut through black, skeletal woods.

The first appearance of celandines in glades and verges, as winter draws to a close.

The magnificent, explosive exuberance of blackthorn blossom, turning whole hedges white.

The unassuming, omnipresent daisies - so often overlooked.

The heads of brimstone butterflies - like tiny miniature Battenberg cakes (look closer!).

The alien, hovering prowess of bee flies and drone flies.

The zippiest of all our bees - the feather-footed flower bees and their frantic feeding flights between lungwort flowers. 

The Hawaiian tropic smell of crushed gorse flowers.

The flashy white rumps of the dandy wheatears.

The gold-leaf eyes of our much maligned toads.

The frantic fury of frogs at spawning time.

The first lime-green leaves unfurling against the first real blue skies.

The first truly warm day of the year - when you can feeeel the sun on your face/back/arse (delete where applicable!).

The hedgehogs' ambling run - like a tiny, wee old Citroen car, raising its shocks and suspension (legs) and then poddling off at speed.

The deciduous woods in spring and summer. Where I've always felt most at ease. Most at peace. And most alive.

The May dawn choruses in those above woodlands. Almost overwhelming to me with my eyes closed.

The English bluebell displays. Just the colour!

The smell of wild garlic - I know I'm in my woodland "happy place" when I smell this warm, green smell.

The roe deer. I think our prettiest British mammal.

The badgers - endlessly fascinating to me.

The craziness of stoats and weasels - such amazing wee things to see.

The clarity of the (hidden) nightingales' song.

The swallows' metallic-ruby throats.

The perfectness of house martins' black and white missile look.

The swifts of course. Just THE best.

The mass dance of mayflies over sparkly slow-moving water.

The brilliance of bats - I mean... properly flying (not gliding - FLYING) mammals. And they're basically blind too! Ridiculous!

The pine trees. Make me feel like I'm abroad, in the sun. I don't know why.

The lowland heaths of southern England. See above.

The crickets. Be they speckled bush cricket nymphs or the more locust-like Roesel's bush crickets. And the sounds they make! 

The devilish nightjars - 2nd only to swifts as my favourite birds of all. Their plumage, their uniqueness and of course... their nocturnal call!

The prettiest, biggest and most impressive (I think) of all our snakes - grass snakes.

The dashing hobbies with their russet pyjama bottoms, fierce, pale eyebrows and black moustache. I think more amazing than peregrines!

The dragonflies. Speak to my uncle about these ridiculous things - but... you know he has a point!

The blue butterflies from silver studded to adonis. Filling our downland and meadows with dancing bits of shattered sky.

The little owls - and their fierce-stared sunbathing on the baking asbestos roofs of cattle sheds.

The buzzards and red kites thermal soaring in giant, high circles on long, hot mornings.

The peregrines which turn a drab tower block into a constant source of amazement - red in tooth and claw.

The sound of pine cones cracking open on trees under the warmth of the sun.

The visible pollen clouds from fir trees. The actual stuff of life (and no... I don't suffer from hay-fever).

The metallic bottle green rose chafers and their audible, whirring flight around photinia flowers.

The dusk-helicoptering stag beetles before Spring (and summer) thunderstorms.

The smell of algae on lock gates.

The leaf cutter bees antics - ferrying bits of rose leaves and sometimes petals to their tubular nests.

The flying golden grains of rice, blue mason bees, with their spectacular eyes (look closer!).

The bright orange tawny mining bees. A perfect bee!

The made up (they CAN'T be real can they?) metallic green and blue and crimson and yellow ruby-tailed  (or jewel) wasps.

The song thrushes  -which in my youth, sang on every TV aerial, but now are hidden spotty gems in hedgerows.

The sound of kingfishers... giving a staccato, high-pitched intercity PEEP as they arrow down a river, 3 foot above the water.

The smell of cut grass. 

The lurid-pink elephant hawk moths. And people say moths are boring.

The hummingbird hawk moths dancing around red valerian and buddleja at dusk. See above.

The ginger and white tree bumblebees. The coolest bumblebees around - and the ONLY bumblebee that will accept a human-made home.

The gentle giant wasps - the hornets. So much nicer than their Germanic cousins.

Jumping spiders. All jumping spiders. The PR face of arachnids.

The west coast beaches. Give me the Sands of Woolacombe, of Croyde, of Newgale, of St.David's head, of Freshwater west and of Saunton.

The most underrated (I think) sea birds of all. The 'top of milk' gannets.

The swallows of the sea - the terns. All terns.

The Labradors of the western seas - grey seals.

The southern and western part of the Isle of Wight. Heaven on an island.

The Scottish highlands on a (the!) beautiful day in the year.

The red squirrels. Their ears in particular. The only delightful squirrel. 

The view from tall cliffs.

The sparkly, dark, lowland rivers. The river Dart in particular.

The enigmatic dippers. No-one knows why they "dip". And that's fine by them.

The hares - so much more than rabbits.

The wagtails. ALL wagtails. Almost human in their mannerisms. And comical to boot.

The jays. Everything about them. Their perky crests. Their pink and blue and black and white feathers. Their intelligence.

The panicky fast-walk (away from you) of disturbed partridges.

The firework colours of beech trees in the Autumn.

The New Forest. Probably one of two or three spots in the UK that I'd like to retire to. One day.

The fly agarics. Stuff of fairy tale!

The way big, bold, laughing green woodpeckers bounce around meadows looking for ants with their beady pale eyes...

The rattle of winter Fieldfares.

The excited tinkling of a flock of waxwing that has discovered a berry feast.

The spectacular goldeneye drakes' displays on our February gravel pits.

The whistling wigeon - just the most perfect of winter sounds.

The animal tracks in fresh snow, before it (the snow) is ruined by people or cars or warmth.

The Spring equinox - the end of winter. The proper end!

The unexpected.

The unfinishe

 

 

ReflectionsReflections

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) love https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/what-do-i-love Tue, 26 Feb 2019 13:15:09 GMT
A few snaps with my new (old) tiny wee camera... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/a-few-snaps-with-my-new-old-tiny-wee-camera A couple of weeks ago I blogged here that I had bought myself a tiny wee Panasonic TZ90 compact camera, to take with me everywhere.

I've been primarily using it as a video camera so far (to video our eldest boy play rugby) but also taken a few photos with it.

Here are some of the photos I've shot with it so far...

Admittedly only one wildlife photo so far (for this "wildlife news" blogging part of my website), of a male dotted border moth in our side passageway last week, but I'm very glad it handles (quasi) macro shots well enough.

More soon, I'm sure.

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) panasonic tz90 test photos https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/a-few-snaps-with-my-new-old-tiny-wee-camera Mon, 25 Feb 2019 15:17:45 GMT
Not quite there yet (remember last year?) https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/not-quite-there-yet-remember-last-year You'll know by now I'm sure, that I'm bored of people telling each other (on soashul meedya these days) that "isn't it INCREDIBLE - LOOK! THE DAFFODILS ARE OUT ALREADY!!!!" in January or February despite, surely, surely, SURELY by now, KNOWING that there are many hybrid varieties of daffodils/crocuses etc deliberately BRED to flower before their traditional flowering time of late February. Indeed there are several varieties of hybridised daffodil which flower every year in December and January - and yet the same people announce their amazement each year at the sight of these flowers - which clearly demonstrate global warming (and not errr.... at all.... horticulturalists' skill and business acumen).

Look. I'm not saying global warming doesn't exist - it clearly does... and we (humans) are clearly facilitating its (terrifying) acceleration, despite what the *cough* famous climatologist Nigel Lawson (among others) says.

But... it (AGW) isn't demonstrated by hybridised (by a human hand) winter flowers.

Now.

That all said, it was again a lovely late winter's day today (we're a full month away from Spring springing). I went for a long walk in the warm (15c) sunshine and photographed a couple of flowers (Blackthorn blossom and marsh celandines - see below... complete with a tiny wee pollen beetle you'll see in the last photo of the marsh celandine).

 

It was wonderful to get a bit of colour in my eyes and to my face today - but I'm mindful that these temperatures are a bit weird in mid February.

Of course, this time last year we had endured the "beast from the east" earlier in the month - and as late as the middle of March 2018, after our frogs had spawned en masse, we had a VERY cold "snap" - which froze our pond and killed a lot of the spawn.

These days, the old adage "ne'er cast a clout 'til May is out", might be a little bit pessimistic - but I'll not count my Spring chickens (so to speak) until my birthday... in mid April.

I hear the weather will be nice this weekend too.... we (me and my eldest boy) are off to watch my beloved Bristol rugby club play Harlequins at Twickenham (Stoop) - so that spot of nice weather is well-timed (it's much nicer sitting in a warm, dry stadium than a frrrreeezing, wet one!).

Whatever you're up to this weekend, have a good one, eh?

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) blackthorn marsh celandine sun warmth winter https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/not-quite-there-yet-remember-last-year Fri, 22 Feb 2019 15:52:30 GMT
The first and the last https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/the-first-and-the-last As the mornings and evenings start to (at last) get lighter... and the frogs and toads all start sweeping majestically across the plains crawling back to their mating ponds (I counted a dozen in our pond two nights ago … with two already in amplexus!) I thought I'd take a photo of a very nice display of crocuses (croci?) outside the local church today, in the watery late winter sunshine.

The crocuses are always the first flowers to push up through the last of the leaves, the oaks', to fall).

And then of the church itself. (All saints' with St.Mark's in Binfield, Berkshire, with its squat tower made of pudding stone, if you really want to know).

By the way… OK... I admit... neither of these photos show my photography skills off particularly well... they're not my finest photos I know... but both were taken with my tiny wee new pocket camera I blogged about here... and both will do me fine I think.

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) croci crocus crocuses https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/the-first-and-the-last Wed, 13 Feb 2019 22:37:56 GMT
The best camera in the world.... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/the-best-camera-in-the-world … is NOT a huge, professional DSLR which costs £5000. With a £20,000 lens attached to it. Which you've left at home as it weighs the same as a baby rhino.

No.. the best camera in the world is the camera that YOU'VE GOT WITH YOU (wherever you are) and which you can use easily and quickly.

 

And with that in mind...

 

 

I know I blogged recently that my next camera would almost certainly be a (three year old technology) compact (tiny really) Panasonic LX15... and that was on my shortlist of three models, one of which I wanted to have as my "go anywhere tool".

Well.

Yesterday I bought a second hand compact camera (from a lovely bloke on eBay)… and whilst it IS a Panasonic Lumix, it's NOT an LX15.

 

Enough with the twaddle - my new (old) camera is a 2nd-hand Panasonic Lumix TZ90 (two year old technology).

And I'm VERY excited about it!

 

Yesterday I drove through the Badlands of Berkshire (drive around the countryside surrounding Stratfield Saye and you'll see what I mean about "the Badlands") to pick up this TZ90 from Mr.M, who incidentally takes superb wildlife photos with his Fujifilm camera(s) - check them out here!

 

My shortlist of three compact cameras were always as follows

1 -  Fujifilm X70 (although this is bordering on not being compact with an APSC sized sensor - HUGE for a compact camera).

2 - Panasonic LX15 (1" sensor - big for a compact camera)

3 - Panasonic TZ90. (1/2.3" sensor - that is to say smartphone sized (SMALL!) sensor).

I also had in mind (for a while) the Canon G5X. Which would have ticked all boxes, fo-sho… but also been a bit too big and clunky, even though I think Canons are built like TANKS... and you know... just work. (Unlike sonys for example).

 

Bottom line is I need(ed) a small camera which

  1. I can take EVERYWHERE with me, and
  2. has a flip up touch screen and
  3. a flash and
  4. perhaps as well as an LCD screen, a viewfinder.

Don't tell my wife will you, but I actually submitted a bid on eBay for a second hand Fuji X70 whilst my wonderful wife was in the last stages of labour a fortnight ago... but I was outbid a few minutes before my second son was born - you'll be please to know (on both counts).

I then spent ten days or so realising that whilst the Fuji X70 with its HUGE (relatively-speaking for a compact(ish) camera) sensor would have been very nice, I didn't really need a large sensor in any compact camera that I would be taking everywhere with me. The small size, flip screen, video capabilities and viewfinder if I could get it... were FAR more important. 

Bearing in mind that I've used three Panasonic Lumix cameras before (the FZ20,30 and 50, in fact I still use the FZ50) I then decided to go for a second hand Panasonic TZ90 - which ticked all my "needs" boxes - and then some to be honest - even if it does have a tiny sensor.

 

And yesterday, Mr.M was kind enough to sell his to me, for a pretty good price I think. Thanks Mr M!

 

OK.

Photos of my new toy can be seen below - I've placed the TZ90 next to a soft ball which is just slightly smaller than a standard sized cricket ball, so you get the idea of its size.

 

 

 

You can read all the tech specs on the TZ90 which I've bought here... but in short, its a very small (TINY) superzoom camera with a small sensor, a superb flippy touch screen LCD and an electronic viewfinder to boot. Plus it shoots pretty good video too.

 

Oh sure... I'll use my DLSRs a lot still.

I ADORE the IQ (image quality) of the full frame 6D and am really starting to appreciate the speed of the 7D mkii.

Yes... if I want a detailed, big shot of something in particular - I'll take those photos with my full frame Canon 6D or bigger APSC Canon 7d mkii sports camera - but other than that - I'll take quite a few photos, day to day, with this wee TZ90.

And believe me... I'll push this TZ90. I used to have something of a reputation amongst photographers as someone who could take certain photos with a camera that was never designed to take such photos!

 

  • It  (the TZ90)will go with me wherever I go.
  • I'll probably leave it on "auto" mode quite a lot - something I've NEVER done before with any camera (I invariably shoot in either "manual" mode or "aperture priority").
  • I'll almost certainly only take JPEGs with it and not RAW images (I've purely been shooting RAW images for almost a decade now so that'll be a change too).
  • And quite often I'll be shooting in dynamic black and white  (see below for a test shot with the camera on one of our cats this afternoon) with this new toy - with the hope of getting more gritty, urban and or documentary-type shots.
  • It has a ridiculous zoom (which I really don't want - but it's there anyway), can take great close ups (to 3cm!), has in built wifi (for remote shooting and automatic downloading to the "cloud" (BONUS - see my last photography based blog here!) and should be a lot of fun to use!

Like I say, it will be with me everywhere I go - but looking at the 300 page instruction manual - I've got a lot to learn about it!

That's all for now grapple fans.

Stay out of the weather today, eh?

TBR.

 

CatCat

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) auto compact dynamic black and white go anywhere jpeg new camera panasonic tz90 photography small https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/the-best-camera-in-the-world Fri, 08 Feb 2019 12:16:18 GMT
Sing-along with "the wildlife daddies"! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/sing-along-with-the-wildlife-daddies Come on.

You know you want to....

(The clips below were all shot yesterday as we "wildlife daddies" carried out our latest wildlife drive around the (snowy) local countryside).

 

For the record (and in case you didn't know - nor read the video clips descriptions on YouTube -

I call my big black estate car "the hearse".

We (just my eldest boy (at present) and I) call ourselves "the wildlife daddies".

We drive around the local countryside after dark, on "wildlife drives", looking for owls (we regularly see three species), deer, foxes, badgers, bats, rabbits and anything else.

Sometimes we sing along to one of the playlists that I have set up on the car's hard drive.

The playlist we sang along to last night is called "Chillin' in the hearse". (Although I really should have called it "Singing-along in the hearse".

I think there are about 40 songs on the playlist - below are a few we sang along to.

We're expecting SONY (or whoever) to call us any day now and offer us a HUGE record deal.

 

Oh... and we saw a tawny owl last night, a few wabbits and a robin on our "wildlife drive".

Enjoy.

TBR.

 

BAKER MAN (LAIDBACK)

 

FOR WHAT IT'S WORTH (BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD)

 

MIGHTY MISSISSIPPI (NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS)

 

MONKEY MAN (TOOTS AND THE MAYTALS)

 

RUN FOR HOME (LINDISFARNE)

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) chillin' in the hearse sing-along the wildlife daddies wildlife drive https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/sing-along-with-the-wildlife-daddies Sun, 03 Feb 2019 09:43:28 GMT
Pink-pelaged patagia! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/pink-pelaged-patagia In the "wildlife blog" part of this website, I generally try to occasionally write about "where I've been and what I've seen", but in this morning's blog post I'd like to again break with tradition and briefly draw your attention to a recent zoological discovery, that I hope may educate you and even then go as far to bewitch you.

Scientists in America have discovered that the Glaucomys spp. of flying squirrels, GLOW PINK (under UV light).

Uh huh.

You heard me.

The North American flying squirrels (or "squirls" as they call them there) are FLUORESCENT!

That is to say the pelage (fur) on their patagia (gliding membrane between fore and hind limbs) is pink. (Feel zoologically-educated yet?)

 

No. It's not April 1st.

And no... you're not drunk. (That's elephants you're thinking of).

I mean, flying squirls are weird anyway (in a good way) - see the NG video below, but to think that they are actually fluorescing pink when gliding around North American forests (to evade the similarly pink glowing owls??!! REALLY???!!!) is something that surely only LSD-facilitated hallucinations are made of, no?

So.

To reiterate.

In North American forests, glowing, fluorescent, pink flying squirrels are being chased around by glowing, fluorescent, pink flying owls.

And that is the NORM! (Feel bewitched yet?).

 

Look. I don't know about you... but to me... this makes me think that there's SO MUCH stuff we (still) clearly DON'T KNOW about the natural world.

There's SO MUCH stuff to be discovered.

And once again, fact is FAR stranger and FAR more incredible and FAR more beautiful than fiction.

Know what?

When I was six years old I found that notion exciting.

And to be honest, (especially after reading about fluorescent pink owls and squirrels) even more so now.

 

Have a good weekend, grapple fans.

TBR.

Purple hazePurple haze

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) fluorescence flying squirrel glaucomys glowing north america owl pink ridiculous https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/2/pink-pelaged-patagia Sat, 02 Feb 2019 08:26:13 GMT
A new recruit! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/a-new-recruit A short blog post today, announcing a new recruit to the warren here, and to "the wildlife daddies" soon I'm sure.

About six years after our first son Ben was born, my beautiful and amazing wife gave birth to our second son, Finn, on Sunday gone, 

With that in mind, I'm sure you'll forgive me if my blogging becomes (temporarily) less frequent.

I AM still around - I'm just a little busier than a few weeks ago.

More soon...

TBR

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) baby finn new https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/a-new-recruit Thu, 31 Jan 2019 13:12:49 GMT
"The Wildlife Daddies" strike again... on the night of the blood supermoon... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/-the-wildlife-daddies-strike-again-on-the-night-of-the-blood-supermoon … with a beautiful tawny owl, on their latest "wildlife drive club" drive around the farm just after it got dark tonight and about eleven hours before the blood supermoon ended the world as we knew it...

 

Look, we (Ben and I) are "The Wildlife Daddies"... so we spotted the owl of course.

It IS in this clip.

But can YOU (mere mortals) spot it?

Well?

Can you?

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) tawny owl the wildlife daddies wildlife daddies https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/-the-wildlife-daddies-strike-again-on-the-night-of-the-blood-supermoon Sun, 20 Jan 2019 18:48:46 GMT
Prince Philip and the Photographers' ephemeris. https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/prince-philip-and-the-photographers-ephemeris I don't really want to dwell on this recent bit of news as any sane person will tell you (in a heartbeat) that any 97 year old should not (of course) be driving on public roads, especially if that 97 year old has spent much of the last 70 or so years being driven around by a chauffeur.

I'd go further than taking his licence off him to be honest, I'd abolish the monarchy at the same time... but that's a different story.

What I DID want to briefly draw your attention to is the notion that the 97 year old was "dazzled by the winter sunshine" as he attempted to join the A149 south, from the B1439 from the Sandringham Estate at about 1500hrs last Thursday.

I happen to use an app on my phone called "The Photographer's Ephemeris" (or TPE).

It's a superb wee thing to show any landscape photographer where the sun or moon is likely to be in the sky at any given time on any given day at any given place.

I use it to get shots a bit like this:

Winter dawnWinter dawn

Or this

Fly me to the moonFly me to the moon

You (or I?!) get the picture.

It's incredibly useful and I use it regularly.

Yesterday I saw that the Sun (newspaper) reported that the Duke was dazzled by winter sun and even gave us a handy diagram of HOW he was dazzled by the sun.

It seemed quite strange at the time to me that he was dazzled by the winter sun in the PIGGING NORTHERN SKY.... so I checked for myself on my TPE app.

The bottom line is that whilst the Duke of Earl (or whatever he's called) was perhaps driving towards the low sun along the B1439 from the Sandringham Estate, intending to stop (obviously?!) at the T junction with the A149 to head south along the 60MPH speed limit A road towards Kings Lynn, there is no way he could have been dazzled by the winter sun at the junction LOOKING NORTH up the road he was intending to join to see the oncoming traffic. The sun was in another part of the sky - and the Sun's (newspaper's) diagram is (again, of course) completely incorrect.

And OK, whilst its fair to say that my Google map streetview screenshots (below) of Prince Philip's view from his Range Rover at the crash site junction were taken in the summer, it was his view at the time of the crash last Thursday, minus the foliage of course.

Reminds me of a near miss I had t'other day as I crossed a petrol station forecourt on foot and had to jump out of the way of a car which suddenly reversed towards me at speed.

I tapped his driver's window with my hand as he went past, pointed to my eyes and mouthed at him "open your eyes please".

Instead of him apologising though... he wound down his window and shouted "I COULDN'T SEE YOU AS YOU'RE WEARING BLUE!" to me.

I laughed and said " YEAH? I'm 6 foot 3 and wearing a stripey hat and you REALLY can't see me?" and walked away shaking my head, smiling.

 

 

 

Like I say, I hope they at least take Philip's licence from him and better still, abolish the monarchy whilst they're at it.

But you know what... with us forelock tugging, cap-doffing Brexit Brits... I don't think I'll ever see that happen.

Shame.

 

Anyway, there you go - forget the royal crash t'other day. This was not meant to be a rant against 100 year old drivers nor a rant against the royal family.

But.

If you  DO photograph a lot of landscapes - you probably already know about TPE.

And if you hadn't heard of it before now - what are you waiting for? Download it! It's free!

TBR.

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) crash moon numpty Prince philip sun the photographers' ephemeris https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/prince-philip-and-the-photographers-ephemeris Sat, 19 Jan 2019 11:27:01 GMT
The future of photography - what Canon and Nikon (in particular) need to do.... https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/the-future-of-photography---what-canon-and-nikon-in-particular-need-to-do A belated "HAPPY NEW YEAR!" to you all, grapple fans.

 

 

Right. Now that's done...

 

I watched a very interesting short video on You Tube t'other day - and you can watch it if you like, below.

There may be a few people reading this who will know more than a little about photography and You Tube and therefore also Tony and Chelsea Northrup (who are the You Tubers in the clip above) - but there may be a few more who don't.

Both Chelsea and Tony Northrup are quite "famous" (at least online) Photographers on You Tube, and they regularly have clips on the site which are worth watching, if you're into your 'togs.

With this clip though they have surpassed even their (pretty) high standards.

I think they're SPOT ON with all they say regarding megapixels and why aren't the big (two) camera companies (that'd be Canon and Nikon) doing more regarding computational power for their new cameras, instead of relying on the old, megapixel and sensor size race.

 

I use four (soon to be five?) cameras still.

My 12 year old 10MP Panasonic Lumix FZ50. For telephoto snaps.

My 12 year old, 10 MP Canon 40D. For wide angle stuff quite often (with its 10-22 mm lens)

My 7 year old, 20MP Canon 6D (for most things that don't move quickly)

My 5 year old, 20MP Canon 7d mkii. (for fast-moving subjects).

And my next camera (if I get it) will almost certainly be a 3 year old 20MP Panasonic Lumix LX15 (to be with me constantly).

I KNOW I don't need more than 20MP - to be honest, 12 is often enough - and I DO regularly make large prints (for the walls of our house).

But all my camera are SO slow.

I don't mean in their ability to take a photo - I mean in terms of the work flow.

I need an SD card and a buffer and tether the camera to my laptop and then upload (slowly) my RAW images and then edit (develop) them slowly in lightroom and then save them slowly on a massive hard drive and periodically (INCREDIBLY slowly) back them all up etc... etc...

All I want to be doing really is taking photos. Not sitting on my cute little tush messing around with laptops, hard drives, cables and bits and bobs of different software.

 

Canon and Nikon (in particular) and Sony and Olympus and Panasonic and Fujifilm all need to get with the programme now and start to COMPETE with Apple and Google (in particular) who, with their smart phones, are quickly demonstrating that "traditional cameras" are fast becoming obsolete. And by "traditional cameras", I'm not just talking DSLRs. I'm talking mirrorless cameras too.

The future of photography must surely be...

Automated uploading of images.

Automated Focus stacking.

Automated Interval stacking.

Automated Panoramic shots.

Automated video processing.

Automated editing, developing and enlarging etc.

All done on a super computer in the cloud, rather than our constantly outdated desk and laptops.

We don't need an 80MP expensive, heavy camera with a £5000 lens if we can take a flurry of photos with average glass on a reasonably-priced 16MP camera with a fast autofocus system - and do magic on them in the cloud - converting them to a 100MP detailed image, with a correct focus point and a removal of haze and blur.

We need a return to dumb camera bodies but with fast sensor readouts, with some onboard cache and a USB-C tethered smartphone.

We need 5G wireless connectivity, full, seamless wifi usability (and not just to transfer images to our phones), to connect to the web and the cloud.

 

Look... we do already have this technology.

It's just that Nikon and Canon (et al) consistently REFUSE to embrace it. Unlike Apple and Google (et al) with their smartphones.

 

I guarantee you this... whichever camera manufacturer does start looking properly to the future by using technology from the present (not the past, after all), will CLEAN UP in the long term.

I thought Samsung would do this first (until they took themselves out of the camera market a few years ago) - so I can only assume it will be another electronics company (like Sony?) who take this all on - and in doing so, they'll leave the old dinosaurs behind.

You heard it here first, grapple fans...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) cameras the future of photography https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2019/1/the-future-of-photography---what-canon-and-nikon-in-particular-need-to-do Fri, 18 Jan 2019 15:50:49 GMT
What wonderful, early Christmas presents for the "wildlife daddies"! https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2018/12/what-wonderful-early-christmas-presents-for-the-wildlife-daddies During these long, dark, winter nights, I often take my (now) six-year-old boy, Ben, on a wildlife drive in "the hearse" (what I call my black estate car) around the local countryside to see what our (both our, proven) eagle eyes can spot in the headlights.

This evening (well... late this afternoon I suppose), I think we peaked.

We did so well and saw so much wildlife tonight that my son Ben couldn't help but fart with excitement! (See clip 2).

All the very short videos embedded below were recorded on my dashcam during our 40 minute wildlife drive tonight.

Clip 1.

Deer roe deer roe deer.

 

Clip 2.

Barn owl number 1.

 

Clip 3.

Tawny owl (less than a minute or so after the first barn owl) - and Ben farts with excitement!

 

Clip 4.

TWO barn owls. Yes. TWO barn owls in front of the December full moon!

We were VERY lucky boys tonight  with not one but TWO barn owls, a tawny owl and a roe doe (with the wonderful December full moon as a backdrop) - and as a result, have named ourselves "the wildlife daddies".

Merry Christmas grapple fans, and if I don't catch you before Hogmanay - hey... go a little easier on that sherry than last year eh?

TBR.

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) barn owl december full moon roe deer tawny owl wildlife daddies wildlife drive wildlife drives https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2018/12/what-wonderful-early-christmas-presents-for-the-wildlife-daddies Sat, 22 Dec 2018 20:24:24 GMT
It's not the critic who counts. (Teddy's right!) https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2018/11/its-not-the-critic-who-counts-teddy-s-right The marvellous winning images of the 2018 Panorama Landscape Photography competition have been announced. You can see many of the winning images by clicking THIS link (takes you to the Daily Mail online unfortunately, but hey ho).

And the images ARE stunning, aren't they?

Well.

No.

No they're not... if you read some of the comments posted by the Daily Mail (online) readers, some of which I've provided for you below.

 

OK OK… I agree. It takes a special kind of turd to even read the Daily Mail, let alone comment on a piece... and I shouldn't read the comments... but I did, so you'll have to deal with that fact.

These people are just awful aren't they?

I mean, they just HAVE to criticise.

And you know, this criticism has been levelled at me over the last ten years (about the time I've been taking photographs) too. By friends, strangers and even a few times, extended family.

It's a story that will ring true to many people reading this who have been known to take the odd good photo or two. And perhaps win an award or two.

And it's a story played out many times.

 

The first thing your critic will do is tell you that you "must have a fancy camera [to take such a nice shot]". I haven't.

Then they'll attempt to tell you that "you've photoshopped it, obviously". "You've obviously edited it [Not like myyy photos which are straight from the camera]!"


If you dare to suggest (as I have once or twice) that "their [straight from the camera] photographs HAVE [of course] been edited by the very camera that their podgy fingers have covered in grease, BEFORE they've downloaded them to their Instagram (or whatever) account", they just won't understand.

You see. They'll be taking JPEG images.

Almost certainly.

Which are digital renditions (generally completely camera controlled in terms of sharpness, colour vibrance, contrast, noise reduction, white balance etc).

The camera that they are using will, ALWAYS will edit their photos for them. Sometimes badly. And the resulting image will hardly EVER be a true rendition of what they saw over the top of the camera. (It will be a rendition of what they saw on their camera's LED screen - but that's edited by the camera too).

Whereas.

I (and millions of other, dare I say, better, photographers) will oftentimes take RAW images (digital negatives) and then develop them in software such as "Lightroom" and then perhaps (only perhaps) "Photoshop".

Look... it's no coincidence that Lightroom is so-called. It's a nod to the old film photographers' "Dark rooms". 

It's a basic developing tool.

Only without the hydroquinone.

I rarely use Photoshop these days - just Lightroom and then Perfect Resize (if I wannae blow the image up to billboard dimensions).

But that still doesn't stop my (and others') detractors from telling me that I over-edit my photographs, I photoshop them and anyyywaaaay… I have a fancy camera. (And they don't).

Jealousy innit?

That's all it is.

I'm heartened to say though, that this blind jealousy, whilst common, isn't universal.

I received a lovely compliment from an old friend this year, as we spent an barbecue afternoon with each other's (and another old school friend's) families this summer.

This old school friend of mine will happily criticise me for many things but even he said about me when the subject came 'round to photography...

"No... No... I couldn't take photos like Doug. Doug just knows how to manipulate and use light".

I was quite taken aback to be honest.

 

Look. I'm no expert and I'm no pro.

But.

Certainly compared to him (and many others), I do know how to occasionally "write (well) with light".

And "writing with light" is the literal definition of "photo-graphy" after all.

 

So.

Don't let the critics grind you down grapple fans - and as a reminder, I've put Teddy Roosevelt's famous speech (or part of it anyway) below.

Incidentally, just so you know, I have a BIG printout of this speech put up on the inside of our lavatory door.

Just to remind me to wind my neck in... you know... if I get a bit critical of something I really have no right to be critical of.

And also to remind me that many times those who (constantly!) criticise my actions or efforts should have no place in my head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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dmackd@dmackdimages.co.uk (Doug Mackenzie Dodds - Images) https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2018/11/its-not-the-critic-who-counts-teddy-s-right Wed, 21 Nov 2018 19:58:32 GMT
Are British garden wildlife "lovers" HARMING wildlife? https://www.dmackdimages.co.uk/blog/2018/11/are-british-garden-wildlife-lovers-harming-wildlife A strange question you may think.

Are wildlife gardeners (I'm specifically-talking about Brits who create wildlife habitats in their back gardens) actually very often HARMING this wildlife?

And do they (the "wildlife gardeners") actually, deep down, look to attract wildlife into their gardens for the sake of the wildlife, or for their own sake?


I asked this question on an internet wildlife forum many, many moons ago (before I became seriously disillusioned with it for a number of reasons - and before it folded) and only one "wildlife lover" of hundreds on the website, was prepared to be introspective enough to even consider such a terrible accusation.

 

I asked then and I ask again now because, if I'm truly honest, yes... I love watching wildlife - I'm endlessly fascinated with it -  and even though I've stopped feeding ANY birds in the garden myself, apart from Fieldfares and jays in the winter, I honestly think I possibly (or regularly) do so for reasons that are more selfish than is obvious at first glance.

You see... I take a great deal of pleasure from attracting jays and fieldfares into the garden. The key words there are "I" and "pleasure".

Likewise, I take pleasure from watching the antics of solitary bees in the bee hotels I've bolted to our huge, framed compost heap.

And I take a great deal of pleasure from watching the life cycle of all our frogs in the small pond that I dug into the back garden.

And I LOVE to get photos of these things. Award-winning photos in some cases. (You know which photos I'm talking about I'm sure).

But this really is all about me still, isn't it?

 

Jay 1Jay 1

You see, the jays would be fine I'm sure, without me putting out monkey nuts in my self-designed, squirrel-proof jay feeder. They probably become dependant on my monkey nuts and I have had five jays before, tearing strips off each other at one time, in a frantic bid to get all the scran. If I REALLY cared about their long term wellbeing, I'd probably do better to plant an oak tree on the edge of woodland every year. But no - I've not planted one oak tree on the edge of a local woodland (even if I have planted one in our back garden - for the jays of course), let alone one each year. I just force-feed them TESCO monkey nuts all winter and create quite probably a very stressful area of the countryside for them, in a particularly unnatural location with an unnaturally high number of jays in this one, tiny area.

Ditto with the fieldfares. I had thirty or forty in the garden when the "Beast from the East" hit in March this year. Although, I suppose I can console myself somewhat with the fieldfares that they (unlike jays) are known for flocking and being a